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Mapping the Big Picture: Curriculum Mapping and Schools

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Mapping the Big Picture: Curriculum Mapping and Schools

  1. 1. Mapping the Big Picture Glenn Wiebe ESSDACK glennw@essdack.org
  2. 2. Sticky ideas?
  3. 3. Curriculum mapping improves teaching & learning
  4. 4. Curriculum mapping is research based
  5. 5. Whadda ya know?
  6. 6. Introduce yourself Explain your score Is there a problem you’re hoping curriculum mapping will solve?
  7. 7. measurable, accurate What data exists that explains why the Oakland Athletics baseball team have consistently finished in the top five over the last ten years . . . . . . even though they have one of lowest payrolls? the
  8. 8. measurable, accurate What data exists that explains why the Oakland Athletics baseball team have consistently finished in the top five over the last ten years . . . . . . even though they have one of lowest payrolls? the
  9. 9. Sabermetrics
  10. 10. “The Book” says: • RBIs measure true batting skill • Walks are neutral • Fielding percentage is useful • Steals are good
  11. 11. measurable, useful What data exists to find great players that no one else knows about?
  12. 12. Beane ignored “the Book”
  13. 13. Moneyball beats the “Curse”
  14. 14. measurable, useful What data exists that helps you understand your building assessment results?
  15. 15. According to Dennis Fox . . .
  16. 16. Outcome - evidence of student learning
  17. 17. Test scores, attendance, behavior, surveys
  18. 18. Demographic - variables that affect student learning
  19. 19. Race, family, SES, ELL, SPED
  20. 20. Most schools focus on these two types of data
  21. 21. First type doesn’t really explain much
  22. 22. And we can’t really control the second
  23. 23. But what about the third?
  24. 24. Process data - variables focused on the teacher / school
  25. 25. Instruction, strategies, resources, technology, assessment types
  26. 26. Third type gives us different “stats” • Curriculum mapping helps you organize this “new” type of data
  27. 27. “To achieve goals you’ve never achieved before, you’ve got to start never done doing things that you’ve before.” Stephan Covey The 8th Habit
  28. 28. So what is it?
  29. 29. “Calendar based curriculum mapping is a procedure for collecting a database of the operational curriculum in a school and/or district.” Heidi Hays Jacobs
  30. 30. Written vs. taught vs. learned
  31. 31. “The primary purpose of curriculum mapping is to have a written record of what is being taught in the classroom. While the lesson plan documents what a teacher intends to teach, the curriculum map logs what is actually taught.” Heidi Hays Jacobs
  32. 32. Huh!?
  33. 33. Document Write down what actually happens in your classroom
  34. 34. Communicate Share classroom instruction data with the people who need it
  35. 35. Collaborate Rich, data driven discussions concerning content and strategies
  36. 36. And?
  37. 37. Students learn what’s important when it’s important
  38. 38. What are some other ways to visualize mapping?
  39. 39. A curriculum guide is to a curriculum map as an itinerary is to a trip
  40. 40. A curriculum guide is to a curriculum map as a game plan is to the actual game
  41. 41. Whadda you got?
  42. 42. It’s the Big Picture!
  43. 43. Most effective practices?
  44. 44. Virginia • Assessment • Curriculum Alignment • Curriculum Mapping • Data Analysis • Intervention Strategies
  45. 45. Ohio Virginia • Curriculum • Assessment Mapping & • Curriculum Alignment Alignment • Professional • Curriculum Development Mapping • Data Analysis & • Data Analysis Tracking • Remediation • Intervention Strategies • Test Preparation
  46. 46. Percentile Percentile Entering after 2 years Average School & 50th 50th Average Teacher Highly Ineffective School & 50th 3rd Highly Ineffective Teacher Highly Effective School & 50th 37th Highly Ineffective Teacher Highly Ineffective School & 50th 63rd Highly Effective Teacher Highly Effective School & 50th 96th Highly Effective Teacher Highly Effective School & 50th 78th Average Teacher
  47. 47. Fall City Elementary test scores
  48. 48. “What is Curriculum Mapping?” • How would your school be different if you had this information? • What changes in your instruction might be possible if you had this information?
  49. 49. Why mapping?
  50. 50. Identifies gaps & repetitions in learning
  51. 51. Identifies gaps & repetitions in learning Encourages alignment between written & taught curriculums
  52. 52. Identifies gaps & repetitions in learning Encourages alignment between written & taught curriculums Provides a visual of purposeful alignment of content, skills/processes, & assessments
  53. 53. Encourages integration across content areas
  54. 54. Encourages integration across content areas Explains test data
  55. 55. Encourages integration across content areas Explains test data Encourages “positive” teacher accountability
  56. 56. “How Does Mapping Benefit Students?” • What are some reasons for implementing mapping in your school?
  57. 57. In groups of three, read “Improving What’s Really Being Taught” • Brainstorm to create a list of questions • Narrow your list down to just one • Send a rover to one other group to “gab and grab”
  58. 58. So what’s it look like?
  59. 59. What’s on a map? Content • Discipline or field-based • Student-centered • Expressed with nouns
  60. 60. Skills and Thinking Processes • Specific, not broad-based • Measurable • Expressed with verbs
  61. 61. Assessments • Demonstrations of learning • Tangible products or observable performances • Expressed with nouns
  62. 62. Anything else? Yes! • Essential Questions • Resources / Materials • Instructional Strategies • URLs • Links to class documents • Standards
  63. 63. “How Does a School Carry Out Mapping?” • Which phase would be the most difficult to implement in your building? • What other questions does the video create for you?
  64. 64. Phase 1 - Collecting the Data • Each teacher records content, skills, and assessments Phase 2 - The First Read-Through • Teachers read each others’ maps to gain information
  65. 65. Phase 3 - Mixed-Group Review • A small group shares findings from the first read-through Phase 4 - Large Group Review • All faculty members meet to share findings
  66. 66. Phase 5 - Determine Points That Can Be Revised Immediately • Faculty members address changes that can be made without further study Phase 6 - Determine Points That Require Long- Term Research • A task force is formed to do research and make recommendations Phase 7 - Review Cycle Continues
  67. 67. Technology? Facilitates / encourages creating and editing maps Allows quick, easy access to information across content, buildings, grade levels Searchable
  68. 68. Allows for very “deep” maps Encourages communication among instructors and administrators Most software is web-based
  69. 69. Rubicon Atlas <www.rubiconatlas.org>
  70. 70. • Next steps?
  71. 71. Whadda ya still need to know?
  72. 72. “The heartbreaking difficulty in teaching is, in fact, that the best methods are also the most difficult ones . . .” Piaget 1969
  73. 73. • Review the maps included in your handouts • Discuss the following question: • Would the “Seven Phase Process” really work? • In small groups, reflect: • What information can be gained from the maps? • What would you be able to do if you had this information?
  74. 74. • Individually examine the “Grade 2 Social Studies Curriculum Map” • Mark places where you have questions or see that revisions are needed • Look for alignment between skills and assessments • What do you like about the map?
  75. 75. • Share your findings in small groups • Discuss where you felt more clarification or revision was needed • What’s missing? What can be deleted?
  76. 76. • Share your small group’s findings with the entire group • What issues might be easily resolved? • Are there issues that need to further study?

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