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Historical Thinking: Strategies for Integration

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Quick presentation on blending social studies & literacy skills

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Historical Thinking: Strategies for Integration

  1. 1. Historical Thinking strategies for integration
  2. 2. glennw@essdack.org @glennw98 glennwiebe.org c4framework.com Glenn Wiebe
  3. 3. don’t be that guy
  4. 4. state standards & assessments
 have changed! 4
  5. 5. “Kids don’t hate history. They hate the way we teach it.”
  6. 6. • All the Light We Cannot See • The Wright Brothers • The Boys in the Boat • The Da Vinci Code • Killing Reagan
  7. 7. • Unbroken • Gone with the Wind • Schindler’s List • Selma • The Imitation Game
  8. 8. “Social Studies content is the vehicle for demonstrating mastery, not the destination.”
  9. 9. Reading so it’s possible to evaluate an argument or claim determine the main idea, identifying and analyzing evidence, relationships, and supporting details comprehend complex and difficult text identify and evaluate critical information communicated in multiple forms of media
  10. 10. Writing clearly and coherently to make an argument using evidence, logic, and reasoning to tell a story by applying the appropriate technologies for the purpose and audience by gathering multiple sources of information and integrating them into short and long term 
 projects
  11. 11. Communicating effectively by preparing and collaborating with diverse partners designing and delivering a presentation on a specific topic presenting information and evaluation to others in a manner that is not totally written text using multiple modes of communication
  12. 12. socialstudiescentral.com
  13. 13. so what does it look like?
  14. 14. - The C4 FRAMEWORK - COLLECT COLLABORATE CREATE COMMUNICATE Find even more C4 information, resources, and useful goodies at www.ceefour.com
  15. 15. - The C4 FRAMEWORK - COLLECT COLLABORATE CREATE COMMUNICATE Find even more C4 information, resources, and useful goodies at www.ceefour.com collect & organize evidence - The C4 FRAMEWORK - COLLECT COLLABORATE CREATE COMMUNICATE Find even more C4 information, resources, and useful goodies at www.ceefour.com
  16. 16. find some buddies
  17. 17. Pie Chart activity
  18. 18. bad loans by large banks high gas / food prices not enough regulatory oversight
  19. 19. what might this look like?
  20. 20. primary sources analysis worksheets
  21. 21. This is an example of propaganda. True or false?
  22. 22. Crop it
  23. 23. we can create our own
  24. 24. STANFORD HISTORY EDUCATION GROUP SHEG.STANFORD.EDU Historical Reading Skills Questions Students should be able to . . . Prompts Sourcing Who wrote this? What is the author’s perspective? When was it written? Where was it written? Why was it written? Is it reliable? Why? Why not? Identify the author’s position on the historical event Identify and evaluate the author’s purpose in producing the document Hypothesize what the author will say before reading the document Evaluate the source’s trustworthiness by considering genre, audience, and purpose The author probably believes . . . I think the audience is . . . Based on the source information, I think the author might . . . I do/don’t trust this document because . . . Contextualization When and where was the document created? What was different then? What was the same? How might the circumstances in which the document was created affect its content? Understand how context/ background information influences the content of the document Recognize that documents are products of particular points in time Based on the background information, I understand this document differently because . . . The author might have been influenced by _____ (historical context) . . . This document might not give me the whole picture because . . . Corroboration What do other documents say? Do the documents agree? If not, why? What are other possible documents? What documents are most reliable? Establish what is probable by comparing documents to each other Recognize disparities between accounts The author agrees/disagrees with . . . These documents all agree/ disagree about . . . Another document to consider might be . . . Close Reading What claims does the author make? What evidence does the author use? What language (words, phrases, images, symbols) does the author use to persuade the document’s audience? How does the document’s language indicate the author’s perspective? Identify the author’s claims about an event Evaluate the evidence and reasoning the author uses to support claims Evaluate author’s word choice; understand that language is used deliberately I think the author chose these words in order to . . . The author is trying to convince me . . . The author claims . . . The evidence used to support the author’s claims is . . . HISTORICAL THINKING CHART STANFORD HISTORY EDUCATION GROUP SHEG.STANFORD.EDU Historical Reading Skills Questions Students should be able to . . . Prompts Sourcing Who wrote this? What is the author’s perspective? When was it written? Where was it written? Why was it written? Is it reliable? Why? Why not? Identify the author’s position on the historical event Identify and evaluate the author’s purpose in producing the document Hypothesize what the author will say before reading the document Evaluate the source’s trustworthiness by considering genre, audience, and purpose The author probably believes . . . I think the audience is . . . Based on the source information, I think the author might . . . I do/don’t trust this document because . . . Contextualization When and where was the document created? What was different then? What was the same? How might the circumstances in which the document was created affect its content? Understand how context/ background information influences the content of the document Recognize that documents are products of particular points in time Based on the background information, I understand this document differently because . . . The author might have been influenced by _____ (historical context) . . . This document might not give me the whole picture because . . . Corroboration What do other documents say? Do the documents agree? If not, why? What are other possible documents? What documents are most reliable? Establish what is probable by comparing documents to each other Recognize disparities between accounts The author agrees/disagrees with . . . These documents all agree/ disagree about . . . Another document to consider might be . . . Close Reading What claims does the author make? What evidence does the author use? What language (words, phrases, images, symbols) does the author use to persuade the document’s audience? How does the document’s language indicate the author’s perspective? Identify the author’s claims about an event Evaluate the evidence and reasoning the author uses to support claims Evaluate author’s word choice; understand that language is used deliberately I think the author chose these words in order to . . . The author is trying to convince me . . . The author claims . . . The evidence used to support the author’s claims is . . . HISTORICAL THINKING CHART
  25. 25. what do you see?
  26. 26. how are they different? how are they the same?
  27. 27. which of these images is most historically accurate? how do you know?
  28. 28. WANNA MAKE A CLAIM? prove it! The author said . . . I know . . . because . . . For example . . . For instance . . . On page five, it says . . . From the text, I know that . . . In the photograph we can see . . . From what I read in . . . According to . . . All of the evidence suggests that . . . THINK LIKE a historian!
  29. 29. select a visual “anchor” graphic notes
  30. 30. write lines of dialogue
  31. 31. - The C4 FRAMEWORK - COLLECT COLLABORATE CREATE COMMUNICATE Find even more C4 information, resources, and useful goodies at www.ceefour.com - The C4 FRAMEWORK - COLLECT COLLABORATE CREATE COMMUNICATE Find even more C4 information, resources, and useful goodies at www.ceefour.com collaborate with others
  32. 32. collaborative document analysis Padlet
  33. 33. padlet.com/glennw/secondarySS
  34. 34. evidence “dropbox” presentation tool print a book “back channel” exit card survey / brainstorm
  35. 35. - The C4 FRAMEWORK - COLLECT COLLABORATE CREATE COMMUNICATE Find even more C4 information, resources, and useful goodies at www.ceefour.com - The C4 FRAMEWORK - COLLECT COLLABORATE CREATE COMMUNICATE Find even more C4 information, resources, and useful goodies at www.ceefour.com Create a solution
  36. 36. tic tac 
 tell
  37. 37. iPhone from the past
  38. 38. Find an old camera. Bring it to class and tell your students that this camera was found in the closet of a retired soldier. The soldier was at the battle of Gettysburg. The film hasn’t been developed yet. If this camera was at Little Round Top, what pictures would it contain?
  39. 39. List the three most important inventions of the twentieth century. Explain why someone might disagree with you.
  40. 40. Both Herbert Hoover and FDR have applied for the job as president in 1932. They have given you their resumes. Who would you hire? Why?
  41. 41. readwritethink.org
  42. 42. sascurriculumpathways.com Writing Navigator
  43. 43. - The C4 FRAMEWORK - COLLECT COLLABORATE CREATE COMMUNICATE Find even more C4 information, resources, and useful goodies at www.ceefour.com - The C4 FRAMEWORK - COLLECT COLLABORATE CREATE COMMUNICATE Find even more C4 information, resources, and useful goodies at www.ceefour.com Communicate the solution
  44. 44. hstry.org
  45. 45. zoomin.edc.org Zoom In
  46. 46. Kahoot getkahoot.com kahoot.it
  47. 47. www.c4framework.com
  48. 48. glennw@essdack.org @glennw98 glennwiebe.org c4framework.com Glenn Wiebe

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