CAH and HCC Rural Broadband Event 17 February 2012

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Slides used at the Hampshire COunty Council and Community Action Hampshire Event event held on 17 February 2012.

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  • RCBF supported projects are strategic NOT tactical
  • Some of this material is contradictory and there are gaps in publicly available information The material will be collated into a single source, with clear attribution to the authors Gaps will either be highlighted, requested from partners, commissioned or delivered by BDUK
  • Community investment Broad view – could be true sweat equity as well as cash Community Ambition The desire of a community to be an active stakeholder in the project All approaches are considered equal IF They deliver the outcome required Pass value for money criteria Have a community mandate
  • Model in test in Cumbria
  • Community strategic involvement Introducing a social impact – inclusion Traditional social enterprise models may not be appropriate when large proportion of the investment is external It will also need to be perceived as a professional investment opportunity, whether its seeking high-network-individuals within the community or external investors. Longer term options are numerous – refinance by the European Investment Bank or a trade sale, for example There is on reason why the partner couldn’t be the LA partner
  • There is no reason why the concession couldn’t be taken by the LA partner – a community NYnet. Being built and run by specialists, possibly as part of a group of concessions, exit strategies are numerous including trade sale to the concession owner or to a third party network operator.
  • The community will need to demonstrate they understand what this entails, and that they are in a position to take long-term strategic decisions Securing service providers will be very challenging for networks smaller then Digital Region! Proving sufficient quality to provide confidence to the health service for tele-health, for example, will be very hard Exit strategies are challenging – trade sale will require substantial due diligence for what may be perceived as a small increase in customer-base. These decisions will affect community members for possible another generation – 20 years!
  • CAH and HCC Rural Broadband Event 17 February 2012

    1. 1. Community Action Hampshire DEFRA and BDUKRural Community Broadband Fund Friday 17 February 2012
    2. 2. IntroductionJoanna DixonSenior Rural OfficerCommunity Action Hampshire Questions at the end of each session Email us at broadband@hants.gov.uk Twitter #RCBFHants
    3. 3. DEFRAJoe LingRDPE Manager01905 768854joseph.ling@defra.gsi.gov.uk
    4. 4. Rural Community Broadband Fund (RCBF)What’s Available & How to Apply
    5. 5. What is the RCBF?• £20M joint DEFRA and BDUK fund• Grant aid for communities located in “hard to reach” locations to establish Superfast Broadband or ‘Next Generation Access” (NGA)• ‘Hard to reach’ as defined in Local Authority Local Broadband Plans - those areas that will not receive superfast broadband through the wider BDUK funded programme• Superfast / NGA is at least 24 - 30 megabits per second.
    6. 6. Who Can Apply?Eligible bodies include:• Community Enterprises • E.g. Cooperatives, Companies Limited by Guarantee or Community Interest Companies• Charities• Local Authorities: • on behalf of communities • Includes Parish Councils• Other Local Partnerships: • Groups of private businesses (that are beneficiaries, not individual Communications Provider businesses)
    7. 7. Who Can Apply?Applicants must:• Be a legal entity in order to enter into a Funding Agreement (existing or proposed)• Be able to source the resources in order to fund expenditure prior to claiming any grant• Be able demonstrate compliance with State Aid and public procurement rules (at Full Application stage)• Be able to sign up to an RDPE Funding Agreement by December 2013
    8. 8. What Can I Apply For?• An eligible body can apply for funds to: • Procure a network operator, or: • Establish the equipment/ infrastructure required to deliver the service themselves• As a guide, there are two broad models to consider in developing an application;  Extending the Local Broadband Plan – Community works with the Local Broadband Plan lead on Demand Aggregation, to extend the proposed 90% area infrastructure into their area  Community Enterprise – Community establishes the required infrastructure themselves
    9. 9. How Much Could I Apply For?• You can apply for up to 50% of the total eligible project costs: • No other public funding can be used as match • Maximum support is £300 grant per premise• As an example, match funding can be found from: • Those who will receive the service committing to pay a connection charge • Or committing to receive the service for a minimum period at a set cost • Other forms of community investment • A procured Network Operator committing funds to infrastructure/ service development • Not an exhaustive list
    10. 10. How do I apply?• Submit and Expression of Interest (EOI) to your local RDPE Lead (“Sponsor”)• Open Call Approach, in Rounds: • Round 1 – closed 31st January 2012 • Round 2 – to be announced, planned to open May 2012• EOI will require you to demonstrate that: • your community is likely to be hard to reach (within the final 10%) • There is sufficient local need and demand • You have the capacity to deliver for reasonable value for money• If your EOI is endorsed, you will be invited to prepare a detailed Full Application, to a timescale you agree with your Sponsor
    11. 11. How will my EOI be assessed?• EOI Assessment Criteria;  Strategic Fit – target communities in a “final 10%” hard to reach area, fit with County Local Broadband Plan  Value for Money – does the project demonstrate good value for money?  Outcomes – evidence of local need/ demand for superfast broadband / NGA, economic and social outcomes, population served  Delivery – is the proposed solution generally realistic and sustainable – technically and financially  Uplands Area – is the project located in an Uplands area?  Community Engagement – evidence of community engagement and support for your project
    12. 12. What Next?• Round 2 of the invitation of calls for interest to be announced, expected May 2012• Work with your local County Council Lead – are you within reach?• Identify your local need and demand• Scope out your options for delivering what your community needs• Talk to us
    13. 13. What Next? Joe Ling 01905 768 854 Joseph.ling@defra.gsi.gov.uk
    14. 14. Broadband Delivery UKAdrian Wooster Natasha InnocentBDUK Director Community Partnerships Demand Stimulation and Digital InclusionCommunity aspects and Next natasha.innocent@culture.gsi.gov.ukGeneration Access inthe final 10%
    15. 15. Rural Community Broadband Toolkit Hampshire 17th February 2012
    16. 16. Background • Government objective: “best superfast broadband in Europe by 2015” • Market expected to deliver to around 70% of country but not “final third” • Broadband Strategy launched with £530m Government funding to deliver: – Rural Community Broadband fund launched to Superfast broadband to around 90% of the population support communities in the final 10% wanting more – than basicuniversal service commitment to A 2 Mbps broadband everyone
    17. 17. RCBF is NGA only!
    18. 18. RCBF Scope • The solution must turn the area “NGA Grey” – Competitively priced wholesale service – A choice of service providers • RCBF is included in the BDUK State Aid application
    19. 19. RCBF Scope • The fund is technology neutral – Projects may choose any combination of technologies if they conform to agreed NGA definitions – Individual satellite services are excluded • Compliance with industry standards is required • Proposals for extension of existing NGA rollout are encouraged
    20. 20. RCBF & Local Broadband Plans • RCBF extends the scope of community engagement Community • Proposals should be endorsed by – A majority of the RCBF or e ct IInd premises in the target ndu cS area ust stry bl i ry – A local accountable body Pu (e.g. Parish Council) – The Local Authority
    21. 21. The toolkit • Will become a living web-based resource • Pointers to existing guidance & material – INCA Beyond Broadband bit.ly/ulnx4d – FttH Council Business Guide bit.ly/uHO1iB – Erisa Broadband Portal bit.ly/uENpgc – Rural Broadband Partnership bit.ly/vrIdOu
    22. 22. FROM CAMPAIGN TO SOLUTION
    23. 23. High-level Process Full Submission to RCBF EoI to RCBF
    24. 24. Keys to success • A solid business plan • A reliable network • A basic set of services • A local set of services • Customer Care • Communication • An “Us feeling” Only 1 is technical 4 relate to your community! * Kees Rover’s 7-pillars
    25. 25. Capacity & Capability Community DIY Enterprise Community Investment Capacity Concession Partnership Using LA Partners Build & Benefit Demand Aggregation Community Capability Do Nothing
    26. 26. #1 Demand Aggregation • The community decides it wishes to have more than the minimum • The community works to – Improve quality of the solution from a minimum in-fill solution to an NGA based solution – Confirm actionable verifiable demand in support of the case for more investment With LA Partners
    27. 27. #2 Build & Benefit • Community is willing to help deliver NGA – E.g. civil engineering, way-leaves or additional funding • Community happy that RoI is gained from benefitting from an improved service • Open Access & ISPs delivered by LA partner With LA Partners
    28. 28. #3 Partnership • The community want to raise some of the risk capital & expect an investment return • Partners are needed to – Provide additional investment – Build & operate the network • Open Access & ISPs delivered by partners • Investment and Exit plans need to be considered Community Organisation
    29. 29. #4 Concession • The community are able to raise all the risk finance • They have no ambition to be a network operator • A concession is offered by the community to design, build and operate their network • The community must steer strategic decisions • Open Access &ISPs delivered by the concession partner • Investment and Exit plans need to be considered Community Organisation
    30. 30. #5 DIY • The community are able to raise all of the finance • They have a strong desire to be the network operator • The community design, build & operate their own network • Open Access & Service Providers delivered by the community • Investment and Exit plans need to be considered Community Organisation
    31. 31. Engagement → Sustainable
    32. 32. Thank you! Adrian Wooster adrian@wooster.org.uk 07788 167776 Natasha Innocent natasha@raceonline2012.org 07917 174205
    33. 33. Go ON campaignsCommunities
    34. 34. BDUK goals for UK by 2015• The best Superfast Broadband in Europe• Standard broadband delivered to virtually all communities• To achieve both the UK also needs world leading levels of digital capability AND the right environment to stimulate demand–t This is what Go ON campaigns seek to do do
    35. 35. Go ON local campaigns aim• to inspire people to recognise the benefits of being online and build their capability•to support everyone in a local area toexperience an enhanced social, cultural +economic life from being online• to create demand for superfast• broadband
    36. 36. Secure connected communities • Inspiring local people + businesses to change behaviour • using tried + tested successful projects such as eHampshire to support change • Using the activists in your community to drive further demand through their enthusiasm, energy + skills Using interesting, relevant + engaging Go ON messaging
    37. 37. Supporting Local BroadbandPlans• Communities can play a significant role in driving demand at very local level• By working together Local Authorities and active communities can achieve increased demand + potentially more roll out from the investment pot available•
    38. 38. Getting started • Identify local partners who could help you get your message across • Gather as much data as possible on who needs support • Recruit digital champions to build skills + raise awareness of the benefits a fast network will bring • Support your network of champions • to stay active + engaged
    39. 39. Go ON community partnersMake use of community networks to helpdrive demand at local level• Faith Communities• Existing volunteer networks• Community organisations• Local pubs and post offices Scouts + Girl Guides The Women’s Institute
    40. 40. Recruit digital champions• Local people willing to share their skills + enthusiasm with friends, neighbours, colleagues or family• Knowing someone’s interests, passions or information triggers allows a personalised introduction to the web• Champions don’t need to be IT experts experts – it’s much more important to be
    41. 41. Next steps• Consider adopting a local Go ON campaign• Use the free marketing assets to promote the benefits of being online• recruit and inspire digital champions to promote Go ON messaging + drive demand• Collect + promote local case studies to inspire others to join in Have fun
    42. 42. Questions ?
    43. 43. Panellists• Joe Ling – DEFRA• Natasha Innocent - BDUK• Adrian Wooster – BDUK• Daniel Fearnley – HCC
    44. 44. Refreshment break Next session starts at 3.30 pm
    45. 45. Hampshire Country Council’s LocalBroadband PlanDaniel FearnleyIT Business PartnerHampshire County Council01962 846359Daniel.fearnley@hants.gov.uk
    46. 46. Hampshire’s Local Broadband PlanDaniel Fearnley, IT Business Partner & Programme Director
    47. 47. This is important…• We understand the frustration• We understand the benefits• We have Chief Officer, Karen Murray , sponsorship• Support from The Leader, Executive Member for Economic Development & Rural Affairs plus Broadband Champion• Senate, Districts and LEPs
    48. 48. What does Hampshire look like withoutthe programme?
    49. 49. Where are we now?•Revised bid •Approved •ProcurementNovember 2011 January 2012 completed end 2012
    50. 50. What are the timescales? 2013 2015•Schedule to be decided with commercial partner•Based upon economic principles. E.g. Demand vs. Cost•Gap funded model•Demand stimulation remains key
    51. 51. What are the targets• 90% of premises • Remaining 10% 24Mbps + minimum 2Mbps
    52. 52. What does 90% look like?
    53. 53. 90% and beyond….• Demand stimulation• Reuse of existing assets• Efficient implementation• Consultation and engagement
    54. 54. Hampshire’s role in RCBF• Share details of our Local Broadband Plan - You need to be in the final 10%• We can offer support and advice• Facilitation – like today!• Can’t bid, but can work together to ensure maximum value
    55. 55. The final 10%....
    56. 56. The final 10%....for now..
    57. 57. Hampshire Broadband What next…• Detailed planning• Procure a partner• Engagement with you and all stakeholders• Improved website, regular updates & quarterly stakeholder engagement
    58. 58. Questions?
    59. 59. CAH supportJoanna DixonSenior Rural OfficerCommunity Action Hampshire01962 857354Joanna.dixon@action.hants.org.uk
    60. 60. Joanna Dixon Senior Rural Officer Community Action Hampshire 01962 857354Joanna.dixon@action.hants.org.uk
    61. 61. Why an issue?• Equalities issue – linked to education, citizenship• Access to services issue – a new dimension• Market forces issue – little rural investment• Hidden disadvantage – not always recognized• Rural economy – dependent for growth• Essential for everyone – not an “add on”
    62. 62. What can CAH do?• Brokering role - today’s event ; open a dialogue• Signposting role – to other sources of expertise & help; other community projects• Help demonstrate demand – raising awareness, educating about benefits & encouraging take up through engagement processes
    63. 63. Further advice & support• OCSI parish profiles – socio-economic data• Bid writing• Organizational & legal structures• Developing social enterprise• Business planning• Networking & cooperation• Intelligence gathering & feeding back
    64. 64. Questions and Next Steps Map to identify whether you are eligible Where to go for further advice and information Use Google - rural broadband solutions Share information - talk to each other
    65. 65. Todays speakers• Joe Ling – DEFRA• Natasha Innocent - BDUK• Adrian Wooster – BDUK• Daniel Fearnley – HCC
    66. 66. Thank youJoanna DixonSenior Rural OfficerCommunity Action Hampshire01962 857354Joanna.dixon@action.hants.org.uk

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