Watercolor: A course taught by Glenn Hirsch

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The next session of this course will be on Tuesday nights starting February 11, 2014 at UC Berkeley Extension's San Francisco Design Center, for more information, email glennhirsch@earthlink.net or visit http://www.glennhirsch.com/id9.html

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Watercolor: A course taught by Glenn Hirsch

  1. 1. Watercolor A course taught by Glenn Hirsch
  2. 2. Watercolor and be precise and realistic, or loose and expressive Andrew Wyeth
  3. 3. LANDSCAPE
  4. 4. Kevin Dame, student
  5. 5. J.M.W. Turner, 1840
  6. 6. John Singer Sargent, 1900
  7. 7. Student study of Winslow Homer
  8. 8. Robert Bechtel, watercolor, 1985
  9. 9. Robert Bechtel, watercolor, 1985
  10. 10. Edward Hopper, watercolor 1920
  11. 11. Winslow Homer, watercolor, 1903
  12. 12. Raoul Dufy, watercolor, 1920
  13. 13. Gustav Moreau, watercolor, 1885
  14. 14. STILL LIFE
  15. 15. Emile Nolde, 1920
  16. 16. Joseph Raphael, 1980
  17. 17. Charles Demuth, 1920
  18. 18. Mary Snowden, watercolor, 1980
  19. 19. artists in art history using watercolor
  20. 20. Eugene Delacroix, 1835 Watercolor study for an oil painting
  21. 21. Claude Lorraine, ink study, 1630
  22. 22. Field study, watercolor, 1850
  23. 23. Van Gogh
  24. 24. Berthe Morisot, watercolor study, 1885
  25. 25. Claes Oldenberg, watercolor study for a monumental sculpture
  26. 26. FIGURE AND PORTRAITS
  27. 27. Andrew Wyeth, watercolor
  28. 28. Andrew Wyeth, watercolor
  29. 29. Emile Nolde, watercolor 1930
  30. 30. Emile Nolde, watercolor 1930
  31. 31. Elizabeth Peyton, watercolor, 1995
  32. 32. Louise Stanley, watercolor 1996
  33. 33. John Singer Sargent, watercolor, 1910
  34. 34. Oskar Kokoschka, watercolor, 1930
  35. 35. Raoul Dufy, watercolor, 1910
  36. 36. Georgia O’Keeffe, watercolor, 1920
  37. 37. Watercolor and be precise and realistic, or loose and expressive examples of ABSTRACTION
  38. 38. Helen Frankenthaler
  39. 39. Mark Rothko
  40. 40. Fred Martin
  41. 41. Fred Martin
  42. 42. Fred Martin
  43. 43. Color theory to enhance the illusion of “light”
  44. 44. What’s the ‘true color’ of the house? It depends on the time of day and the weather The ‘real’ color doesn’t exist independently of the light
  45. 45. Claude Monet painted ‘white marble’ on the Rouen Cathedral in different times of day, showing that color doesn’t exist independently of the light
  46. 46. Since color is “relative,” we use warm and cool versions of each color to enhance the feeling of “light”
  47. 47. Chromatic scale to enhance the illusion of “light” Lighter b/w value in the light Brighter intensity in the light Warmer (orangey) red in the light (vs bluer purplish) in the shadow
  48. 48. Watercolor Technique
  49. 49. Work from light to dark, reserving the white paper where you want white color Allow each step to dry before proceeding to the next
  50. 50. Work from light to dark, reserving the white paper where you want white color Allow each step to dry before proceeding to the next
  51. 51. Work from light to dark, reserving the white paper where you want white color
  52. 52. Work from light to dark, reserving the white paper where you want white color Allow each step to dry before proceeding to the next
  53. 53. Work from light to dark, reserving the white paper where you want white color Allow each step to dry before proceeding to the next
  54. 54. You can also touch-up white areas with white acrylic paint
  55. 55. Picasso, watercolor and gouache, 1910

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