Web Hosting in Cloud Computing Era

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Web Hosting in Cloud Computing Era. Are the kids alright? Presentation at webhostingday2010, March 2010.

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Web Hosting in Cloud Computing Era

  1. 1. Are the Kids Alright?Web Hosting in Cloud Computing EraGlen KoskelaCTO Nordic Region Copyright 2010 FUJITSU
  2. 2. Web Hosting Spells “C-O-M-M-O-D-I-T-Y” Thousands of hosting companies competing for your next customer It costs €4.50 to go up the Eiffel tower up to the second floor by stairs The kids are not alright: revenue increase a rising challengeGlen Koskela, CTO Nordic Region 1 Copyright 2010 FUJITSU
  3. 3. Application Context More Into Account Web sites getting more costly & complicated to run Rich media, social networking, bidirectional services, collaboration, ecommerce, IP services, APIs, DBs, messaging encryption, archiving, security,... Instead f I t d of web space, value driven market b l di k t is interested in web apps Customers are getting attracted to novel ways to benefit from exposing web data – greater interaction, richer Internet applications, collaboration and social software – instead of just designing web-sites web sites Apps and data are at the centre of emerging web-presence valueGlen Koskela, CTO Nordic Region 2 Copyright 2010 FUJITSU
  4. 4. If You Don’t Monetize, Someone Else Will Identify what motivates customers and increase your value as web hosting provider, or position your company for acquisition… Web hosting that delivers profit Focus on the monetization of data on a few killer web apps/services Rely on an adapted and scalable infrastructure Get more data from user or from other websites through platforms and APIs websites, Get more direct revenues by larger exposure bringing additional traffic Improve core services monetization through the exploitation of new data p g p Business cases are made of revenues, not just costsGlen Koskela, CTO Nordic Region 3 Copyright 2010 FUJITSU
  5. 5. Customer Priorities Might Shift Quickly LAMP is not enough, need to move beyond shared web hosting pp g Market demand for hosted web apps and functional web hosting SaaS based applications Predominantly commoditized business applications Typically hosted by software vendor using multi-tenant model Many web hosting companies are well positioned to innovate a new economic and technical model for business applications Innovations that bring new web functionality to current non-users non users of advanced enterprise 2 0 software 2.0 Value driven web hosting runs application instancesGlen Koskela, CTO Nordic Region 4 Copyright 2010 FUJITSU
  6. 6. Collaborative Enterprise Applications Traditional on-premise enterprise software is in a phase of consolidation No dominant design y for web-based enterprise software g yet p Collaborative application model not defined yet, no given business model defined yet No dominant model for technical design yet The defining characteristics are all core competencies of web hosting Fully web-based user interface Hosted deployment, sold in volume, no long commitments Simplified pricing, subscription business model Use of a integrated software architectures Enterprise 2.0 model undefined but an interesting business opportunityGlen Koskela, CTO Nordic Region 5 Copyright 2010 FUJITSU
  7. 7. Develop a Competitive Web Advantage Ability to power scalable services which competitors find hard to replicate Ability to let customers monetize data-driven services y Ability to let customers use open innovation to accelerate the development of their services Technical and financial entry barriers increasing Diverse use cases drive datacenter requirements Limited off-the-shelf solutions Mostly homegrown developments for both closed hw and semi-closed sw Infrastructure is a key enabler of future programmable webhostingGlen Koskela, CTO Nordic Region 6 Copyright 2010 FUJITSU
  8. 8. Prepare for Clouds Impact of emerging cloud services to web-based Ability to install any company web-sites, business processes, web application application workloads, and information services To succeed, must help customers to build, organize and manage new types of IT infrastructures that meet the needs of web-site and web scale application hosting web-scale And must help them to use agility, flexibility and efficiency to their market advantage Evolve towards dynamic infrastructure provisioned on-demandGlen Koskela, CTO Nordic Region 7 Copyright 2010 FUJITSU
  9. 9. The Main Difference Compared to Today What differentiates programmable web hosting from web hosting? Turning on the power of the Internet = prepare for multiple value streams Application management complexity? Image variations, lifecycle management? Change management, incident resolution? Variety of SLAs to offer and new monitoring tools? Less consolidated sites per server? Scaling? Provisioning? Automation? Storage? Correct answer: profitGlen Koskela, CTO Nordic Region 8 Copyright 2010 FUJITSU
  10. 10. Web Facing Apps Fit Web Hosting VM-ready applications are New web + apps sites – three-tier similar to volatile web sites architectures with minimal DB tiers Multi-tenant compute farms Modular mashups + web apps – loose coupling services; On-demand build scale via load balancing and g Dynamic capacity app-level caching Underlying layers can be y g y Highly parallelized workloads – HPC w/o close coupling, H d / l li Hadoop designed horizontally and replicated across customers Apps that fit within a single VM –any type of self-contained x86 app What would a cloud infrastructure mean for your revenue growth?Glen Koskela, CTO Nordic Region 9 Copyright 2010 FUJITSU
  11. 11. Performance = Bottom Line Horizontal scaling applications must perform well, or users click-away…Glen Koskela, CTO Nordic Region 10 Copyright 2010 FUJITSU
  12. 12. Options for Cloud Infrastructure $$$ + Energy efficient Industry Rack Blade Proprietary + Facility efficient servers Densityy standard servers -CapEx Lock-in mnt sw - OpEx Software Standard Blocks Proprietary hw in-a-box System design independent Internet Incremental Decouple storage Datacenters Complex and No COTS Smaller Managed Megasize Massive volume deployments Low cost units web/apps hosting Inexpensive way to scale business is requiredGlen Koskela, CTO Nordic Region 11 Copyright 2010 FUJITSU
  13. 13. Focus on the Cost of Doing Business Future hosting opportunities all are made more cost-efficient by on-demand (web) server infrastructures – limited off-the-shelf solutions Allows to combine a cost-effective architecture Freedom of management with high-quality customer experience software preferred Make use of more Reduction of both OPEX and CAPEX virtualization, needs new breakthrough technologies! dynamic provisioning, automation,… More commodity hardware preferred Concrete need for specialized servers, purposefully developed for hosting business Hosted web apps delivery fabric excels in cost-efficiencyGlen Koskela, CTO Nordic Region 12 Copyright 2010 FUJITSU
  14. 14. Cloud-Server Infrastructure Platform Objectives Optimize 19” rack and server standards for massive scale-out d l datacenters and Cl d d Clouds Remove “hw overhead” of classical datacenter infrastructure Address the needs for High scaling and lowest power consumption by utilizing shared cooling & simplified design Double DC density with innovative cooling & minimized “working footprint” Cut down CAPEX by rip & replace server node design Simplicity for management maintenance and operation by customer replaceable server management, (CRS) Cloud eXtensionGlen Koskela, CTO Nordic Region 13 Copyright 2010 FUJITSU
  15. 15. Fujitsu’s Announcement Designed for service providers ”Cloud eXtension” PRIMERGY CX1000 Cloud infrastructure platform for IaaS p Scale-out platform for Web2.0 applications For large scale out data centers with scale-out 100s or 1000s of server nodes Energy savings Anyone facing p y g power, cooling or , g Low cost infrastructure density problems with current facilities Space savings Environmental control Cool-Central architecture Server infra designed for clouds, managed hosting and web hostingGlen Koskela, CTO Nordic Region 14 Copyright 2010 FUJITSU
  16. 16. New Economics @ Critical Cost Drivers OPEX cuts Energy costs ~20 % off Cooling costs ~20 % less 20 DC space up to 40 % less p CAPEX gain up to 20% Cuts down cost of doing web business: OPEX and CAPEXGlen Koskela, CTO Nordic Region 15 Copyright 2010 FUJITSU
  17. 17. What is PRIMERGY CX1000? Back-to-back setup 38 nodes in each unit Compute Innovative shared cooling infrastructure Simple, very energy efficient I/O at front + Standard server board Compute Future-proof flexibility nodes Rip & replace design IPMI server management + Switch agnostic Standard St d d Standard switches in 5 bays switches Shared or dedicated mnt LAN Ideal platform for web applications, VM server farms, apps farms, IaaSGlen Koskela, CTO Nordic Region 16 Copyright 2010 FUJITSU
  18. 18. Richness in Simplicity, Value in Customizing Reducing overall costs of doing web hosting business Better balance between space, power, cooling and capacity Adding value to customer specific line of services, web and apps Highly customizable, integration for off-the-shelf x86 nodes to fit with real workload patterns We looked for the complexity in servers – and removed itGlen Koskela, CTO Nordic Region 17 Copyright 2010 FUJITSU
  19. 19. Facility Efficiency Rack servers PRIMERGY CX1000 p 100s of fans per rack enclosure p 2 fans per enclosure Hot aisle & Cold aisles No Hot aisles, Back-to-back Front to back Front-to-back airflow Front to top Front-to-top airflow Cool-Central architectureGlen Koskela, CTO Nordic Region 18 Copyright 2010 FUJITSU
  20. 20. In the Midst of a Significant Transformation MSP clouds Public (tier 2) Mega clouds Enterprise E t i clouds Driving the hosting industry toward new cloud infrastructure spaceGlen Koskela, CTO Nordic Region 19 Copyright 2010 FUJITSU
  21. 21. Glen Koskela, CTO Nordic Region Copyright 2010 FUJITSU

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