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Social Georeferencing
A Model for Libraries
By Glen Farrelly

February 2014
About Me
• Doctoral candidate @ University of Toronto,
Faculty of Information
• 15+ years as digital media consultant and
...
Presentation Overview
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Introduction
Terminology
Importance
Social georeferencing
Examples
a. British Librar...
Introduction
• Location-based services (LBS)
made geographically relevant
info more accessible & desired
• Current ways to...
Terminology
Geographic Info Retrieval
Importance of Topic
• People value geographically relevant
information
• Long history of media used to
deliver geo. releva...
Use of Location-Based Services
60

% of respondents

50
40
30
20
10
0
Find nearby Find nearby Find nearby
businesses
event...
Social Georeferencing
• Users create information for
georeferencing, via
o geotagging
o plotting on map
• Helps with topon...
Examples…
British Library
• Asked public to georeference maps

• Used online tool (below) developed by Klokan
(klokantech.com/georef...
OurOntario
• Collaborative project with libraries & museums
across Ontario

• Assisted in digitizing and online cataloguin...
Flickr Map
• Easy to use and familiar online tool to georeference
location of photos via plotting on map
• Flickr also ena...
LibraryThing
• LibraryThing is example of easy-to-use, social tool
people use to describe, tag, and share info

• Projects...
Caveats
• Quality and accuracy of public’s work
• Malicious hijacking
• Exploitation of free labour
• Creating and managin...
Encouraging Participation
• Offer incentives and prizes
• Reward “super users”

• Give credit for contributions
• Promote ...
More Information
 delicious.com/glenfarrelly/HHLIB
 glenfarrelly.blogspot.ca
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Social Georeferencing: A Model for Libraries

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I have conducted survey and ethnographic research that has shown people value geographically relevant information and that they will georeference information themselves for a variety of motivations.

Yet the current mechanisms in library collections to georeference information through automation or manual effort are often not sufficient. Current projects are providing online, collaborative tools to allow people to georeference material. This crowdsourcing model of social georeferencing is not only scalable but also allows people to determine the place of information resources that they find meaningful.

This presentation will introduce the core concepts of geographic relevance, georeferencing mechanisms, geosocial networking, and locative technology to present a model for libraries to consider that may help bring their collections into the field.

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Social Georeferencing: A Model for Libraries

  1. 1. Social Georeferencing A Model for Libraries By Glen Farrelly February 2014
  2. 2. About Me • Doctoral candidate @ University of Toronto, Faculty of Information • 15+ years as digital media consultant and web producer • My dissertation examines how people’s use of locative media affects their spatial relationships • For further Glen info  glenfarrelly.com
  3. 3. Presentation Overview 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Introduction Terminology Importance Social georeferencing Examples a. British Library b. OurOntario c. Flickr d. LibraryThing 6. Caveats 7. Recommendations Sample of a libraries local studies collection
  4. 4. Introduction • Location-based services (LBS) made geographically relevant info more accessible & desired • Current ways to georeference are insufficient • Online, crowdsourcing offers potential solution
  5. 5. Terminology
  6. 6. Geographic Info Retrieval
  7. 7. Importance of Topic • People value geographically relevant information • Long history of media used to deliver geo. relevance • LBS have increased demand • Much info in libraries not sufficiently georeferenced
  8. 8. Use of Location-Based Services 60 % of respondents 50 40 30 20 10 0 Find nearby Find nearby Find nearby businesses events sites View pictures or videos of location Read Read history Read local current info of location news of location Read reviews of nearby businesses In a survey I did, 86% of respondents reported using their device to access at least one place-related function in the past month. The results are dated now, so I expect these rates to be higher. At the high end, 84% reported finding proximal businesses or services, reading local news (74%), finding nearby sites (67%), and reading information about their location (66%).
  9. 9. Social Georeferencing • Users create information for georeferencing, via o geotagging o plotting on map • Helps with toponym problems • Collaborative and social • Scalable
  10. 10. Examples…
  11. 11. British Library • Asked public to georeference maps • Used online tool (below) developed by Klokan (klokantech.com/georeferencer) • In 7 weeks, 2700 maps completed • More details: www.bl.uk/maps
  12. 12. OurOntario • Collaborative project with libraries & museums across Ontario • Assisted in digitizing and online cataloguing of local history collections • Public contributed objects and comments on location & details of existing online items • More info: http://ourontario.ca/
  13. 13. Flickr Map • Easy to use and familiar online tool to georeference location of photos via plotting on map • Flickr also enables geotagging, i.e. folksonomy tags • Geotags may better capture place-name info seeking behaviour of people • Visit map: flickr.com/photos/glenfarrelly/map
  14. 14. LibraryThing • LibraryThing is example of easy-to-use, social tool people use to describe, tag, and share info • Projects have successfully combined LibraryThing’s user-generated content with library catalogues • Model of way to combine social georeferencing with library catalogues • librarything.com
  15. 15. Caveats • Quality and accuracy of public’s work • Malicious hijacking • Exploitation of free labour • Creating and managing an online, collaborative system is time-consuming • Maintaining public (and internal) interest in project
  16. 16. Encouraging Participation • Offer incentives and prizes • Reward “super users” • Give credit for contributions • Promote with social media • Engaging user experience (incl. gamification) Read: Holley, R. (2010). Crowdsourcing: How and why should libraries do it? D-Lib Magazine, 16(3/4).
  17. 17. More Information  delicious.com/glenfarrelly/HHLIB  glenfarrelly.blogspot.ca

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