The Quest for Impact: The Transformation of Research from a Traditional to a Participatory Format in Southern Ethiopia

556 views

Published on

The Quest for Impact: The Transformation of Research from a Traditional to a Participatory Format in Southern Ethiopia. Presented by D. Layne Coppock (Utah State University) at the GL-CRSP "End of Program Conference" on June 18, 2009, Naivasha, Kenya.

Published in: Education, Travel
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

The Quest for Impact: The Transformation of Research from a Traditional to a Participatory Format in Southern Ethiopia

  1. 1. The Quest for Impact: From Traditional to Participatory Research in Ethiopia Layne Coppock PARIMA Project, GL-CRSP Closing Conference Naivasha, Kenya, 2009
  2. 2. Roadmap  Background  Example from Southern Ethiopia  What Have I Learned?  Academics/scholarship  Sustainability  Role of Livestock CRSP
  3. 3. Impact Assumptions  Proper problem diagnosis  Lack of other systemic constraints  Effectiveness of extension
  4. 4. Researched Topics, 1985-99  Pastoral livelihoods (trends, diversification prospects)  Descriptive rangeland ecology  Trials: Options to improve calf growth  Trials: Options to improve forages  Trials: Options to improve milk processing
  5. 5. Does any of this matter?
  6. 6. Shift in Approach, 2000-09  PRA (joint problem diagnosis)  Peer-to-peer learning/Cross-border diffusion  Action Research (monitoring/problem solving)  Structured survey (groups vs. non-groups)
  7. 7. Participatory Rural Appraisal
  8. 8. PRA Results, 2000  Results from several Boran communities were remarkably similar  Lack of food and water seen as the primary problem  Locally sustainable solutions focused on education, diversified livelihoods
  9. 9. Data from Kenya Groups  16 group leaders interviewed  Avg group age = 10 years  Avg charter members = 24 (no men)  Avg illiteracy = 85%  Half of groups formed spontaneously  Detailed constitutions, by-laws (memorized)  Savings; livelihood diversification; publ. services  High success rates; internal/external challenges
  10. 10. Group Formation Back in Ethiopia  60 collective-action groups quickly formed between 2001 to 2003  2,167 charter members; 76% women  Capacity building short-courses (including micro-finance) were implemented  Action research added as a monitoring tool
  11. 11. Livestock Marketing  Groups wanted stronger links to markets  PARIMA used participatory processes to help create a new value chain from pastoral producers to livestock exporters in Addis Ababa  This coincided with favorable changes in markets and institutions in Ethiopia
  12. 12. Group Micro-finance Statistics (June 2008)  60 groups, 2001-2008 (not one has failed)  Savings mobilized = $92,735  Number of micro-loans = 5,368  Repayment rate = 96%  Volume of loan value = $647,666  Loan interest generated = $29,729  Profits from small business = $25,614*  Grew to 2,300 group members; over 13,800 direct beneficiaries
  13. 13. Small Ruminant Market Supply, 2003-05  11 groups monitored, 289 members total  Average capitalization of US $3,136  Average head traded per group 2,330  Average profit: US $333 to US $1,111
  14. 14. Innovation System: Stakeholders  International members: 3  Regional members: 12  Local members: 31
  15. 15. Capacity-Building Cost Estimation  Selective inputs for 13,800 beneficiaries  PRAs/CAPs = $0.52 (4% of population)  Short courses = $4.03 (3%...)  Tours = $4.63 (9%...)  NF Educ = $0.99 (16%...)  Seed loans = $9.96 (17%...)  Mon & Eval = $14.16 Total = $34.29 over 3 years
  16. 16. Effects of Intervention  Compared to paired controls in 2 locations, collective action improves:  Personal skills and confidence (P<0.001)  Level of social support (P<0.001)  Cash income and access to credit (P<0.001)  Personal quality of life (P<0.01)
  17. 17. What Have I Learned?  Traditional vs. participatory work in the context of “the academy”  Sustainability and stakeholder turnover  Responsibility to human subjects
  18. 18. Participation Checklist:  Benefits  Costs  Local impacts  Transaction efforts  Empirical evidence for  More time and money interventions  Harder to generalize  Satisfaction from results, publish? observing research application  Risk of “losing control”
  19. 19. Emerging Voices  “Research for development”  “Participation, problem-solving, sustainability science”  “Integration and implementation science”  “Innovation systems, new forms of knowledge”  “Post-normal science”
  20. 20. Scholarship Assessed (Glassick et al. 1997)  Scholarship transition beyond “discovery” to include verifiable links to integration, application, teaching…  Is higher ed a private benefit to individuals, or an investment in a collective public good?  What scholarship “matters,” and how do scholars work?  Need for stronger societal engagement  Scholarship ideals: integrity, perseverance, courage
  21. 21. “First, he wants to know where you will publish”
  22. 22. Hans Jahnke (1982): “building human capacity is the main way to achieve development impact on marginal lands…”
  23. 23. Role for Livestock CRSP? Emphasize:  Discovery, integration, application  Authentic partnerships, sustainability  Longer-term funding horizons  Supporting “global institutional memory”
  24. 24. This research was made possible through support provided to the Global Livestock Collaborative Research Support Program by the United States Agency for International Development under terms of Grant No. PCE-G-00-98-00036-00 and by contributions of participating institutions.

×