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Audiology Students and Patient-Centred Communication - HEARing CRC PhD presentation

1.
Explore key academics’ perceptions of PCC and how clinical communication is taught in Australian graduate audiology programs.
2.
Explore the nature of PCC between patient and student during clinical encounters within a teaching clinic.
3.
Explore students’ perspectives of their PCC skills and how clinical communication is taught.

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Audiology Students and Patient-Centred Communication - HEARing CRC PhD presentation

  1. 1. 2Aims 1. Explore key academics’ perceptions of PCC and how clinical communication is taught in Australian graduate audiology programs. 2. Explore the nature of PCC between patient and student during clinical encounters within a teaching clinic. 3. Explore students’ perspectives of their PCC skills and how clinical communication is taught. Acknowledgments: We would like to thank all the participants, clinical educators, and support staff from UoM and MQ for their involvement in this project. Special thanks to Phillip Nakad and Isabelle Biosvert for their assistance. 4Preliminary Results Phase 1 • Nine program coordinators and key teaching staff • Barriers and facilitators to teaching PCC “When we do turn our attention to the obvious need for more on patient-centered care, more on counseling, the immediate question is where?” “Communication is gritty, it's dirty, it's clumsy, it's noisy, it's uncontrollable, it's quiet, it's violent, it's this, it's that, you can't understand it by thinking” Phase 2 To date: 21 student-patient interactions recorded and 9 students interviewed. Preliminary emergent themes • Case history and feedback on management • Power balance 1 Background What is Patient-centred communication (PCC)? • PCC incorporates the concept of patient-centred care. • It adopts a holistic approach to care and values the patient’s perspectives. • PCC facilitates a therapeutic relationship, which in turn increases patient satisfaction and patient adherence to treatment or recommendations 1. PCC in Audiology • Despite audiologists’ self-reported preference for patient-centred care 2, PCC is rarely adopted during a clinical encounter 3,4. • This gap highlights the need to explore how PCC is taught and fostered in graduate audiology education. • Little is known about the nature of PCC between audiology students and patients, and the students’ perspectives on their own clinical communication have yet to be explored. Methods Design: Mixed methods (i.e. integration of quantitative and qualitative) containing two phases. creating sound value www.hearingcrc.org Audiology Students and Patient-Centred Communication Samantha Tai1,2, Caitlin Grenness1,2, Robyn Woodward-Kron3, & Richard Dowell1.2 1HEARing Cooperative Research Centre, 2Department of Audiology and Speech Pathology, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia, and 3Melbourne Medical School, University of Melbourne, Australia. 3 5 Phase 1 - Aim 1 Participants: Audiology course coordinator and/or key teaching staff from all six graduate audiology programs in Australia. Data: Semi-structured qualitative interview Analysis: Qualitative content and thematic analysis Phase 2a - Aim 2 Participants: Final year audiology students from three universities with an on-site training clinic. Adult patients attending a full hearing assessment appointments at a university audiology clinics. Data: Video-recording of student-adult patient hearing assessment and questionnaires. Analysis: Roter Interaction Analysis System (RIAS) Statistical analysis Participants: UoM students who participated in the video recording were invited to participate in the interview. Data: Video reflexivity and semi-structured interview Analysis: Qualitative content and thematic analysis Phase 2b - Aim 3 Implications • Perspectives from both academic staff and students will provide an insight into how PCC is perceived, taught and enacted. • Findings will assist in identifying barriers and facilitators in teaching and learning PCC. • Collectively, findings will inform aspects of clinical communication that needs to be refined or strengthened across Australian audiology programs, and facilitate patient-clinician interaction in future audiologists. References: 1. Mead N, Bower P. Patient-centredness: a conceptual framework and review of the empirical literature. Soc Sci Med. 2000;51(7):1087-1110; 2. Laplante-Lévesque A, Hickson L, Grenness C. An Australian survey of audiologists’ preferences for patient- centredness. Int J Audiol. 2014;53(Suppl 1):S76-82; 3. Grenness C, Hickson L, Laplante-Lévesque A, Meyer C, Davidson B. Communication Patterns in Audiologic Rehabilitation History-Taking: Audiologists, Patients, and Their Companions. Ear Hear. 2015;36(2):191-204; 4. Grenness C, Hickson L, Laplante-Lévesque A, Meyer C, Davidson B. The Nature of Communication throughout Diagnosis and Management Planning in Initial Audiologic Rehabilitation Consultations. J Am Acad Audiol. 2015;26(1):36-50.

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1. Explore key academics’ perceptions of PCC and how clinical communication is taught in Australian graduate audiology programs. 2. Explore the nature of PCC between patient and student during clinical encounters within a teaching clinic. 3. Explore students’ perspectives of their PCC skills and how clinical communication is taught.

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