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Oral History Analyzing Primary Sources The Federal Writers’ Project Slave Narratives
The Federal Writers’ Project <ul><li>U.S. Federal Government Project to fund written work and support writers during the G...
Oral History <ul><li>A type of historical documentation that is based on interviews of survivors of the period being studi...
Before Emancipation Cabins where slaves were raised for market—the famous Hermitage, Savannah, Georgia.
Slave quarters on a Southern plantation.
Slave Life in the South
After Emancipation Emancipated slaves on a sharecropping plot.
Most blacks in the South after emancipation worked as sharecroppers, renting the land and materials from landlords.  Share...
A sharecropper’s cabin in Mississippi.
Life During and After Slavery During After <ul><li>Blacks considered property of  rich whites </li></ul><ul><li>Not allowe...
Isom Moseley <ul><li>“ My name is Isom Moseley. Raised up in old time without a mother. My old master and mistress raised ...
Classwork <ul><li>As a group, choose a slave narrative that sounds interesting to you.Read the narrative aloud with your g...
Isom Moseley’s Life During and After During After
Wrap Up Questions <ul><li>How has this reading changed your understanding of slavery? </li></ul><ul><li>What details of th...
H o m e w o r k <ul><li>Write a response to the lesson and reading in your journal.  Use 3-2-1 format. </li></ul><ul><li>3...
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Slave Narratives

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Slave Narratives

  1. 1. Oral History Analyzing Primary Sources The Federal Writers’ Project Slave Narratives
  2. 2. The Federal Writers’ Project <ul><li>U.S. Federal Government Project to fund written work and support writers during the Great Depression—when one out of every four people was unemployed. </li></ul><ul><li>Over 6,000 people were employed by the project, including writers, editors, historians, researchers, art critics, archaeologists, geologists and cartographers </li></ul><ul><li>The majority of FWP employees were women, and very few African Americans worked on the project. </li></ul><ul><li>Recorded the life stories of over 10,000 men and women </li></ul><ul><li>Famous Participants: Ralph Ellison, Richard Wright, Zora Neale Hurston </li></ul>
  3. 3. Oral History <ul><li>A type of historical documentation that is based on interviews of survivors of the period being studied. </li></ul><ul><li>FWP interviewers recorded some of their interviews on records. </li></ul><ul><li>Recording oral histories is much easier for historians now. They use computers, digital recorders, DVD recorders, etc. </li></ul>
  4. 4. Before Emancipation Cabins where slaves were raised for market—the famous Hermitage, Savannah, Georgia.
  5. 5. Slave quarters on a Southern plantation.
  6. 6. Slave Life in the South
  7. 7. After Emancipation Emancipated slaves on a sharecropping plot.
  8. 8. Most blacks in the South after emancipation worked as sharecroppers, renting the land and materials from landlords. Sharecroppers for the most part lived in poverty and worked just as hard as slaves did. Sharecropping
  9. 9. A sharecropper’s cabin in Mississippi.
  10. 10. Life During and After Slavery During After <ul><li>Blacks considered property of rich whites </li></ul><ul><li>Not allowed to own property, marry freely, or move about freely. </li></ul><ul><li>Families could be split apart to be sold individually </li></ul><ul><li>Learning to read was illegal. So was teaching a slave to read. </li></ul><ul><li>Owners’ violence toward slaves was legal; By law, slaves could not resist physical abuse. </li></ul><ul><li>Black men voted for the first time in 1867 </li></ul><ul><li>Blacks could hold public offices </li></ul><ul><li>Could move where they wanted to—many former slaves migrated North </li></ul><ul><li>Thought of as less than Whites </li></ul><ul><li>Worked mainly in agriculture </li></ul><ul><li>Lived in very rudimentary dwellings </li></ul>
  11. 11. Isom Moseley <ul><li>“ My name is Isom Moseley. Raised up in old time without a mother. My old master and mistress raised me. My master was named L. M. My mistress was name B. M. Well, are you ready for me to talk?” </li></ul><ul><li>Born in 1853, Moseley was 12 years old when he was emancipated. </li></ul>
  12. 12. Classwork <ul><li>As a group, choose a slave narrative that sounds interesting to you.Read the narrative aloud with your group. </li></ul><ul><li>Use Venn diagram handout to analyze how your narrator’s life changed after emancipation. </li></ul><ul><li>You will use the information you come up with here for a paper. </li></ul>
  13. 13. Isom Moseley’s Life During and After During After
  14. 14. Wrap Up Questions <ul><li>How has this reading changed your understanding of slavery? </li></ul><ul><li>What details of the narrative surprised or interested you? </li></ul><ul><li>How much time passed between slavery and the interviews? </li></ul><ul><li>How might this time lag affect their stories? </li></ul><ul><li>How old are the people being interviewed? Does age affect memories? </li></ul><ul><li>Who interviewed the people and documented their stories? </li></ul><ul><li>Is it significant that many interviewers were white, and subjects were black? </li></ul><ul><li>What are the strengths and weaknesses of oral histories? </li></ul>
  15. 15. H o m e w o r k <ul><li>Write a response to the lesson and reading in your journal. Use 3-2-1 format. </li></ul><ul><li>3 things I learned. </li></ul><ul><li>2 things I would like to remember. </li></ul><ul><li>1 question I have. </li></ul>

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