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Oklahoma Collections Innovation Presentation

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Oklahoma Collections Innovation Presentation

  1. 1. Moneyball, the Extra 2%, and What Baseball Management, Fantasy Football, and Newspapers Can Teach Us About Fostering Innovation in Managing Collections Greg Raschke North Carolina State University University of Oklahoma March, 2014
  2. 2. Baseball to Collections Context
  3. 3. Supply-Side Collections  Print-based, unpredictable demand, and legitimate need for just in case collections  Lead to judging quality by size (as in the ARL rankings) and libraries were then held captive to this standard  Contributed to inelastic demand for journals and combinations of speculative buying  Use is secondary to size, dollars expended, and other input measures  Credit to David Lewis (http://ulib.iupui.edu/users/dlewis)
  4. 4. Supply-Side to Will Not Continue $- $2,000,000 $4,000,000 $6,000,000 $8,000,000 $10,000,000 $12,000,000 $14,000,000 $16,000,000 $18,000,000 $20,000,000 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 Total Library Materials Expenditures 1983-2013 ARL 1 ARL 2 ARL 3
  5. 5. Assumptions  Economics are not sustainable  Collections budgets will not grow at rate of past 30 years  Unit growth and growth in cost per unit are not sustainable  Need to lower costs of overall system  Lower unit costs  Use data and users to be more precise  Tipping point for ability and expectations to deliver content at point of need  Therefore collection practices and strategies must change  This is difficult – much reason for optimism
  6. 6. Demand-Driven Collections – Core Roles  Make information easily, widely, and cheaply available  Collections as drivers of research, teaching, and learning  To make special or unique collections held/managed by the library available to the user community and the world
  7. 7. Demand-Driven – More Assumptions  Less tolerance for and less investment in lower use general collections  Resource management based increasingly on use  Embrace expansion of available content and sense- making role  Risks of not evolving and failing to innovate – newspapers
  8. 8. Demand-Driven – Assertions  Tension between time-honored role as custodians of scholarship versus enabling digital environment for scholars  Must work on:  Lowering unit costs of scholarly materials OR  Lowering number of publishable units  Must free funds for investing in “new” arenas such as digital curation, digital scholarship, DDA, and collaboration
  9. 9. Demand-Driven – Assertions  Use based and user driven collecting models will take growing share of budget  Bet on numbers  Bet on good and quick  Put resources into enabling digital environment for scholars and custodian role will come out of that strategy  Rewards of adapting – more used and vital than ever
  10. 10. Demand-Driven – Changing Practice  Access won – management and coherence are keys  Not just PDA – portfolio of approaches - more responsive and expansive  Utilize new tools and techniques to become advanced analysts and deliver content at point of need  Truly embrace evidence-based decision making and ability to deliver content on demand  Challenges:  Resource sharing  Existing practices and organizational models
  11. 11. Competency Trap
  12. 12. Competency Trap
  13. 13. Looking Deeper and Questioning Existing Practices  Identifying market inefficiencies.  Apply and accelerate significant creativity.  Question long-established wisdom.  Test what is “known” with in- depth analysis, statistical modeling, and new approaches.  Value in stopping making stupid decisions  Emphasize interpersonal skills in leveraging new knowledge and approaches.
  14. 14. Reducing Unit Costs – Data Analysis  Collections work less about selection and more about analyzing use and incorporating content w/technology  Data analysis is a key component in solving/managing:  Increasing pressure for accountability  Increasing capability to gather and analyze data  Increasing precision in the way we build collections and expend resources  Advocacy  Changing practice and data analysis at NCSU
  15. 15. Serials Review 2009 – Open, Data-Driven, and Real-Time Analysis  Standardized usage data (where available)  Bibliometrics - publication data and citation patterns (e.g LJUR)  Impact factor and eigenfactor  User community feedback via interactive, database-driven applications  Weigh/calculate/quantify user feedback  Weigh price against multiple data points  Usage ((07 usage+08 usage/2)+(publications*10)+ (citations*5)+(Impact Factor)  Community Feedback ((Weighted Ranking x % Match) x Total # Rankings) + 0.1 x # of "1s“  Price/feedback value  Price/use  Merge results to filter out top 20% and bottom 20%
  16. 16. Looking closer – Book Collections An example - a closer look at print item usage  Traditional ILS reporting tools can make this difficult  Advanced analytical tools can help  What types of questions can we ask?  Should Patron-Driven records not purchased be purged after 1 year?  How does print item usage break down?  Which categories of print items net the best value?
  17. 17. If it’s not used after 2 years… Should PDA records be purged? Maybe… We haven’t even hit 50% usage But what if we take a longer view…
  18. 18. If it’s not used after 2 years…  Things begin to look different
  19. 19. Looking even closer…  How does print item use break down?  Single circ usage is consistently ~14%  Would this change in a PDA only world?
  20. 20. Expenditures to University Data
  21. 21. Expenditures to University Data
  22. 22. Expenditures to University Data
  23. 23. 0 1000000 2000000 3000000 4000000 5000000 6000000 7000000 8000000 Reserves E-books Digital collections requests Print book circulations/renewals Database use Full-text journal downloads Measurable Uses of the Collection 2009/2010 Full-text journal downloads* 3,672,600 Database use 1,989,972 Print book circulations/renewals 525,430 Digital collections requests 471,403 E-books 149,815 Reserves** 327,267 Total Uses 7,136,487 * Includes use of NC LIVE full-text content ** Includes textbook, print, and e-reserves usage Measurable Uses of the Collection 2009/2010
  24. 24. Collections Data in Re-Conceptualizing Library Space  Sell new collections layouts and inventory.  Decision-making.
  25. 25. Collections Data in Re-Conceptualizing Library Space
  26. 26. Collections Data in Re-Conceptualizing Library Space
  27. 27. Collaborative Imperative  Print curation  Digital curation  Digital collections  Regional networks  Mega-consortia and collective bargaining  Reframe notion of collections budget
  28. 28. Challenges  Have ability to be more precise, more used, and more relevant than ever – need to make the necessary changes  CAVE people and Zealots  Data and user-driven approaches can punish niche areas, disciplinary variation, and resources without data  New value, new skills
  29. 29. Challenges, cont.  Contradiction of personal apps/devices and open resources  Open resources impact ability to control and command discovery environments, content delivery, and data analysis
  30. 30. From Assumptions to Assertions to Practice  Grow/develop/hire analysts.  Adapt statistical tools such as SAS software.  Partner with digital library/technologists.  Develop positive arbitrage.  Put resources into enabling digital environment for scholars.  Experiment – budget for it, reward it.  Work hard to get the faculty to buy into new approaches.  Combine analytical approaches with the people skills . “…there was a bias toward what people saw with their own eyes, or thought they had seen. The human mind played tricks on itself when it relied exclusively on what it saw, and every trick it played was a financial opportunity for someone who saw through the illusion to the reality”.

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