Taming the flame: Reaching transformation while preventing domestic violence

460 views

Published on

This roundtable discussion aims to:
Discuss the utility in expanding our current understanding of anger management in preventing domestic violence.

Examine and formulate a response to results from community needs assessment and focused interviews with persons in current mandated anger management programs.

Reflect on the importance of addressing issues of culture, gender, group practice and power in domestic violence prevention programming.

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
460
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
5
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Taming the flame: Reaching transformation while preventing domestic violence

  1. 1. Taming the flame: Reaching transformation while preventing domestic violence Sujata Swaroop, M.A. Kyle Rundles, M.A.
  2. 2. Round Table Discussion: Goals and Agenda <ul><li>Discuss the utility in expanding our current understanding of anger management in preventing domestic violence. </li></ul><ul><li>Examine and formulate a response to results from community needs assessment and focused interviews with persons in current mandated anger management programs. </li></ul><ul><li>Reflect on the importance of addressing issues of culture, gender, group practice and power in domestic violence prevention programming. </li></ul>
  3. 3. Background <ul><li>Anger Management Programs: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Often assigned to perpetrators of violent crimes, such as assault or injury to another person 3 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Purpose is to make client aware of the triggers, responses, and consequences of expressing anger in maladaptive ways 4 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Usually in a set sequence of topics, activities, and worksheets over a fixed number of sessions </li></ul></ul>
  4. 4. Shortcomings <ul><li>Anger management programs likely do not cover all violent crime and offer virtually no cultural or gender perspectives </li></ul><ul><li>Focus on momentary outbursts rather than power and control and often neglect the topics of premeditation, taking responsibility for past abuse, and prevention of violent crime 1 </li></ul>
  5. 5. Case Example: Local CMHC <ul><li>Designed for moments of anger and anger control strategies without addressing deeper roots of anger or cultural considerations </li></ul><ul><li>Used in an individual format </li></ul><ul><li>No inclusion of the concepts of power and control or preventing domestic violence </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Concerning considering that some individuals seeking anger management have domestic violence charges </li></ul></ul>
  6. 6. Need for Domestic Violence Prevention Component <ul><li>Several studies have reported that people jailed for domestic violence charges are more likely to have a history of violent offenses 2,5 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Crowe (2004) reports that 58 percent of inmates arrested for domestic violence have previous convictions of violent offenses </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Quann (2006) found that most participants (offenders in DV court) had at least one prior conviction, all of which were violent offenses or threats of violence </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Aggressive crime usually occurs between people who know each other 4 </li></ul><ul><li>It seems from this research that individuals with violent offenses may be at risk for committing domestic violence offenses and would likely benefit from programs that target the prevention of domestic violence </li></ul>
  7. 7. The Curriculum at a Local CMHC <ul><li>Recently reformatted to include: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Power, control, and preventative measures </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Culture and gender considerations </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>A larger focus on underlying issues </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Flexible session inclusion to tailor to the individual </li></ul></ul><ul><li>The current Domestic Violence Group is only available in group format </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Why not anger management? </li></ul></ul>
  8. 8. Needs Assessment <ul><li>Part one of the needs assessment has been conducted through interviews with clinicians at a local CMHC </li></ul><ul><li>Part two included focused interviews with potential group members </li></ul>
  9. 9. Why is group work important in DV prevention? <ul><li>Cost-effective </li></ul><ul><li>Seeing that others struggle with similar things </li></ul><ul><li>Interactive learning (Role-plays, Group Process) </li></ul><ul><li>Empowering each other to make change </li></ul><ul><li>Added stress from transitions can lead to anger outbursts </li></ul><ul><li>Unresolved issues often not addressed in current program </li></ul>
  10. 10. What are the strengths of the community and the partnership? <ul><li>Local CMHC staff is available and works towards cultural competency and offers culturally sensitive services </li></ul><ul><li>Word about good services gets around quickly in close-knit community </li></ul><ul><li>Community is receptive to group work </li></ul>
  11. 11. What are the needs for this type of group in the community? <ul><li>Five years ago, only men were coming in for anger management course, now there are more women and a wider variety of victims </li></ul><ul><li>Need to raise awareness about the serious nature of the issue, it’s risks, and the importance of prevention </li></ul><ul><li>Women have specific issues to address with anger, DV, and crime and may also have been victimized in the past </li></ul><ul><li>Cultural norms are very rigid and involve many gender-role issues (violence may be accepted) </li></ul>
  12. 12. What are some concerns/barriers? <ul><li>Rigid belief systems </li></ul><ul><li>Denial in community at large </li></ul><ul><li>Wish to keep things private </li></ul><ul><li>Group work isn’t mandated </li></ul>
  13. 13. Focus Group Questions (1 0f 2) <ul><li>What issues do you see as strengths and challenges in your community? </li></ul><ul><li>How do you see anger affecting your community? </li></ul><ul><li>Do you think crime rates can be reduced through prevention programs? </li></ul><ul><li>How could gender and cultural considerations be involved in current anger management programs? </li></ul>
  14. 14. Focus Group Questions (2 0f 2) <ul><li>What do you think is missing from current anger management programs? </li></ul><ul><li>How would your goals be different in a group setting? </li></ul><ul><li>What do you see as the benefit(s) of groups for anger management? </li></ul><ul><li>How can domestic violence be prevented? </li></ul><ul><li>How might anger management be used to prevent domestic violence? </li></ul>
  15. 15. Focused Interview Responses (1 of 2) <ul><li>Major Themes: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Culturally-specific challenges related to domestic violence. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Some denial of community violence. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Need to treat more than the “symptoms.” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Experience of local programming and personnel as empowering. </li></ul></ul>
  16. 16. Focused Interview Responses (2 of 2) <ul><ul><li>Major Themes (Continued) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Belief in prevention as route for approaching domestic violence in the community. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Raising community awareness of DV as a route towards prevention. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Group and shared experience as potentially empowering. </li></ul></ul></ul>
  17. 17. Program Goals <ul><li>To provide a group component to enhance the current anger management program. </li></ul><ul><li>To offer culture and gender sensitive support and reciprocity. </li></ul><ul><li>To address issues that are not currently focused on in anger management programs: domestic violence, culture, gender, group practice, power. </li></ul><ul><li>To educate the community on the importance of preventing DV in light of its connection with other violent crimes. </li></ul>
  18. 18. Developing the Program <ul><li>Guiding tenets of Community Psychology: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Ecological model </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Prevention </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Resistance of the hegemonic imposition </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Community counselor as a social change agent </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Empowerment </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Circular process </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Transformation </li></ul></ul>
  19. 19. Framework for the Program <ul><li>“ A just therapy is one that takes into account the gender, cultural, social, and economic context of the persons seeking help.” 3 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Gendered perspective </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Cultural perspective </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Social Context </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Economic Context </li></ul></ul>
  20. 20. Domestic Violence Prevention Program for Local CMHC (1 of 2) <ul><li>Group will meet weekly. </li></ul><ul><li>Group members all have a history of difficulty with anger management. </li></ul><ul><li>Purpose of group: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Can meet with other community members. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Life stories, anger, confusion, pain. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Learn to accept responsibility for their anger. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>But also learn about influence of systems. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Learn ways of making reparation to those who have been harmed (by their anger). </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Forgiveness. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Rediscovery and Reconnection </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Stories, Language, Dance, etc. </li></ul></ul></ul>
  21. 21. Domestic Violence Prevention Program for Local CMHC (2 of 2) <ul><li>Making Purpose Reality: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Stories will not be told in a vacuum: reflective work. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Work focuses on consequences of anger and the liberation processes for both the ‘victim’ and ‘perpetrator’. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Work focuses on second order change. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Therapists will foster a warm working relationship, but also be direct, challenging, and clear on the issues of oppressive anger and violence. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Confidentiality and safety maintained. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Cultural, gender, social, and economic equity as just expectations for therapy. </li></ul></ul>
  22. 22. Reflection: Barriers, Shortcomings, Future Work <ul><li>Original idea for focus group came up short </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Scheduled and counted as a regular session, but 0 out of 5 participants came </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Contacts with potential group members were limited </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Access to contact information was limited due to confidentiality </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Focus group to Group transition </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Plan to implement group in future. </li></ul></ul>
  23. 23. Discussion <ul><li>Please share your thoughts, reactions, critiques, points of interest. </li></ul><ul><li>Would this type of programming be effective in your community or place of work? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Please elaborate. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>What do you see as necessary aspects of DV prevention groups? </li></ul><ul><li>What do you see as barriers to this type of work? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>For service providers? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>In the community? </li></ul></ul>
  24. 24. Select References <ul><li>1. Bailey, M.B. (2006). Improving the sentencing of domestic violence offenders in Maine: A proposal to prohibit anger management therapy. Maine Bar Journal, 140-149. </li></ul><ul><li>2. Crowe, A.H. (2004). Community corrections’ response to domestic violence: Guidelines for practice. American Probation and Parole Association, 37 - 39. </li></ul><ul><li>3. Dulwich Center. (1990). Justice therapy. Dulwich Center Newsletter, 1, 6-32. </li></ul><ul><li>4. Hollenhorst, P.S. (1998). What do we know about anger management programs in corrections. Federal Probation, 62(2). </li></ul><ul><li>5. Quann, N. (2006). Offender profile and recidivism among domestic violence offenders in Ontario. Research and Statistics Division, Department of Justice, Canada. </li></ul><ul><li>6. Ooms, T. (2006). A community psychologist’s perspective on domestic violence: A conversation with Julia Perilla, Ph. D. Center for Law and Public Policy. </li></ul><ul><li>7. Perilla, J. L., Lavizzo, E., & Ibañez, G. (2006). Towards a Community Psychology of Liberation: A Domestic Violence Intervention as a Tool for Social Change. In E. Aldarondo (Ed.) Promoting Social Justice Through Mental Health Practice. </li></ul>

×