Social multimedia 2.0: an introduction for students in SPPH 581H Dean Giustini, UBC librarian |  [email_address]   |  SPPH...
<ul><li>What is social multimedia ?  </li></ul><ul><li>Social multimedia tools that aid collaboration?  </li></ul><ul><ul>...
… refers to multiple online formats that foster significant individual participation as well as group collaboration… one t...
“… free software tools such as GoogleDocs and Zoho introduce students to the notion of collaborative authoring and how ide...
Welcome to my personal learning environment! Watch this 3 min. YouTube video about Symbaloo Symbaloo = To assemble (media)...
To collaborate is to “co – labor” <ul><ul><ul><li>‘… in the long history of humankind those who learned how  to collaborat...
<ul><li>Can there be meaning  without  people? No. </li></ul><ul><li>Meaning is made by groups, not individuals  </li></ul...
” ...collaborative projects really make for an excellent educational experience ...students bounce ideas off each other an...
Real-time collaborative editing (RTCE) is synchronous (simultaneous), meaning that users can edit the same file at the sam...
YouTube  http:// www.google.com /apps/ MedTing  http://medting.com/products-overview/ Metacollab.net  (collaboration on co...
<ul><li>Create complex networked multimedia documents  without  specialized training </li></ul><ul><li>Read Sophie books i...
Newer collaborative practices <ul><li>Virtual environments, free from physical constraints of  real life </li></ul><ul><li...
<ul><ul><ul><li>Augmented intelligence </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Collaborative leadership in public health </li>...
<ul><li>Encourage  collaboration to generate projects </li></ul><ul><li>Use  social multimedia to encourage F2F interactio...
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SPPH 581H Class 9 2011

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Social multimedia & collaboration

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  • Social multimedia and web 2.0 an introduction for SPPH581H students I chose a photo of the YouTube Symphony f inal concert which was streamed live from the Sydney Opera House in Australia in 2010 If you can, watch the video of the multimedia projections inside the Concert Hall and onto the sails of the Sydney Opera House it’s amazing to me that more than 100 musicians from countries around the world can come together for a musical collaboration gives you an idea of what is possible when you use the power of the web to bring people together from different backgrounds and cultures symbolizes WHAT IS POSSIBLE
  • Some ideas that I’d like to explore over the next hour What social media or “social multimedia” aids us/helps us to collaborate YouTube/ MedTing Podcasting/ Webcasting Presentation software / Screencasting Are there specific tools and information practices that can help us? I think it’s important for us to revisit the “social aspects” of collaboration and touch on the trends of openness, remix and what might even be called collaboration 2.0 I’ve also got some ideas that come from various threads in the literature around how to use social media (and multimedia) to create learning environments
  • social multimedia provides additional context for us to understand soemthing context adds to multimedia tools and applications and may improve our analysis of content In other words, we can leverage human activities through multimedia to improve our ability to bridge the so-called semantic gap Shamma et al (2008) Enhancing online personal connections through the synchronized sharing of online video http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?doid=1358628.1358786 Watching television and movies with friends is a regular social activity. Web video—particularly its principle representative, YouTube—does not support this synchronous social conversation. When we invite friends to watch a video with us, sharing and conversation often takes place by crowding around a monitor to watch a clip or huddling around a small screen on a video iPod. Without co-presence, videos are watched alone and our social interactions around videos are confined to asynchronous comment threads left by family, our friends, and the greater social network community
  • From a very early age children learn how to play as individuals but also as part of a teams In fact, children learn and have to be taught how to collaborate In terms of media, what are their biggest influences? In fact, we are seeing this team-based pedagogy entering schools. In terms of social media, UBC education librarian, Joanne Naslund said “… free software tools such as GoogleDocs and Zoho introduce students to the collaborative authoring and how ideas evolve through iterative editing. ...Noodletools helps students create note cards, bibliographies and a place to store research. 2Learn.ca uses a similar approach with its online netlog sheets &amp; concept maps ….At mySchoolog students organize their school life online, create schedules, organize projects and ...upload various forms of media.&amp;quot; So I think collaborative tools once the right ones are selected help us to build our collaborative skills ….and to find some fluidity between our collaborations face to face and in online spaces
  • What is Symbaloo? Symbaloo is touted as the easiest starting point on the Internet and comes from the Greek word meaning ‘to gather’ or ‘assemble’ Using a simple flash website, Symbaloo aggregates media such asGoogle search, Wikipedia, YouTube, etc. Some students use Symbaloo as a homepage because it keeps everything organized (an important thing to do as a use). In order to be effective at managing your own learning, you might want to consider an aggregation tool or PLE and share it with others
  • All kinds of people engage in collaborative endeavors everyday. In fact, I would characterize many of our interactions thus far in SPPH581 H as collaborative and moving in that direction all the time…. If you break the word “col- laborate down, notice that the components mean to DO work (LABOUR) with others As an UBC faculty member, I depend on collaboration with my colleagues to exhange expertise for example when I need them to: provide their perspectives on aspects of my work or teaching share their knowledge or skills with me which are often pre-cursors to deeper more meaningful types of collaboration And I am on the lookout to “co-labour” all the time Charles Darwin, he who coined the phrase ‘survival of the fittest’, points out that….”in the long history of human beings those who learned how to collaborative and improvise effectively are the ones who have prevailed…”
  • So let’s talk for a moment about collaborating with others and making sense of the process. It seems obvious but worth repeating that there can be no meaning in anything in life without people…. The plain truth is that people (both individually and as teams) create meaning be it a project in an archive, a service in a library or even an assignment in an online course The question is whether there is also individual learning that takes place as well as in the group? And the answer is of course – the idea of learning in human cultures stretches back millenia but meaning often begins individually and then is brought to the group for discussion for a shared understanding and refinement. Finally, and this applies directly to social media, …m eaning is made persistent online through the creation of artifacts once a group is ready to create the artefact Collaboration is not the same as cooperation . Collaboration requires alignment of people around common goals such as those we typically encounter in information organizations. Collaboration is first and foremost about doing something together. Finally, I think it’s important to say that any collaboration will lasts only as long as the alignment around a common purpose lasts….
  • Some of you may know about the many collaborative spaces created by Google. Google Apps is a service that provides ways to customize Google products under a custom domain . It has several applications with functionality similar to traditional office software such as: e- mail , chat, Calendar and writing tools. By the way, Google Apps is free and offers the same amount of storage as Gmail and in addition to shared calendars, docs and so on there is Google Marketplace which is an App &amp;quot;store&amp;quot; for Google users. It contains free and for fee apps which can be installed to customize collaboration for teams Here Richard Ellwood, a teacher from the US, says about the educational version of Google Apps that” ” ...collaborative projects really make for an excellent educational experience ...students bounce ideas off each other and improve each other&apos;s writing skils – the process itself teaches them how to work well with others - a valuable skill for everyone...”
  • Google Docs for RTCE (real-time collaborative editing) Google Docs is one of several online tools that allow individuals to work together and engage in real time collaborative editing on a shared document. According to some people, the experience of doing real time editing mirrors working on a document through Word software or a closed Wiki except the work is conducted online and collaborators can work together in real time. In the past, collaboration on a document involved passing a document back and forth between authors via e-mail or in paper formats. Each author would take a turn at editing, correcting, modifying or building on the work of others. This was a long, painstaking process. The process could be very error-prone opening the door to loss of ideas and creating version-control issues, formatting problems and sometimes outright loss of information. These days, online collaboration ware seems to be almost necessary to get anything done in a timely manner.
  • There are any number of collaborative and social tools to help you create electronic spaces for collaboration. And too many to mention. However, here are a few: YouTube MedTing MEDTING is a free online MED ical Mee TING and Exchange platform where registered medical practitioners can publish and share medical content. Users can create clinical cases, upload images and videos. Currently there are 2336 cases to read and 29203 images and videos to view. MedTing is a great online resource to share and discuss clinical images and videos. The images or videos that are posted are accompanied by the cases themselves, and it is even possible to refer a case to known experts within the online community for further guidance. I have found this site a useful reference tool with some great clinical cases to stimulate visual learning. The site is clean, crisp and easy to use and certainly worth review.
  • There are many new interesting projects that involve media and collaboration but one I thought I’d highlight is this one from the Annenberg school in the United States called Sophie 2.0. Sophie is open source software tool for writing, reading and visualizing social media in interactive networked environments. It aims to create easy-to-use tools that allow authors to combine text, images, video and sound Sophie&apos;s users are interested in creating networked multimedia works without having to program or train others how to use costly tools The Sophie 2.0 project was originally developed by the Institute for the Future of the Book. The University of Southern California&apos;s School of Cinematic Arts assumed sponsorship in 2009 with a generous grant from the The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation I think this type of specialized platform is one with huge potential for bringing people to collaborate over knowledge objects and multimedia
  • Some Newer collaborative practices In the context of social media, collaboration across organizations, virtual environments and networks won’t happen without open, transparent and egalitarian processes in place… But once a fair and equitable process is in place some experts believe that virtual environments are important for the future of collaboration For example, the act of teleportation which is a part of Second Life for example creates all kinds of new opportunities for interaction / And includes opportunities for greater creativity and exploration / In addition, Twitter shows real potential for collaboration as a tool to support back channels during conferences such as this talk by dana boyd (and you can see the backchannel posted behind her) / Finally, in the setting of a F2F class, students can collaborate with each other using Twitter by exchanging ideas and lecture notes in an synchronous text environment (or read it later asynchronously)
  • There are a number of trends in collaboration worth mentioning some of which you have heard before in this class or in other classes: for example: Augmented intelligence, or the ability to supplement what you know by pairing up with others // Cloud computing is a trend in collaboration because of the ability to store documents on the web There is also a new journal called Collaborative librarianship which examines some of the issues I’ve mentioned // Like augmented intelligence, there is crowdsourcing of which probably Wikipedia is the most obvious example // Distributed cognition I mentioned in module II Collaborative Innovation Network Smart mobs // Swarm creativity Wisdom of the crowd // Social networking Flash-Mob Cataloging is when a horde of LibraryThing members descend on some small library, catalogue their books in LibraryThing, eat some pizza, talk some talk and leave them with a gleaming new LibraryThing catalog.
  • In conclusion, as you progress through the rest of the course, try to think of ways of encouraging collaboration among your peers to generate and or complete your final project By all means, try to use social media to encourage more interactions that take place face to face, even if you have to Skype to meet One of the principles of collaboration 2.0 is to find new ways to embed archivists &amp; librarians online but to remember to support that process through the application of appropriate tools And finally don’t forget that there is a logical progression from Participating fully in something to being a Collaborator.....and finally creating something of permanent value to your organization. This idea of creating will ultimately lead us into module IV.... So in the meantime, with that, I hope you have enjoyed the presentation... And we’ll talk soon.
  • SPPH 581H Class 9 2011

    1. 1. Social multimedia 2.0: an introduction for students in SPPH 581H Dean Giustini, UBC librarian | [email_address] | SPPH 581H Fall 2011 101 musicians from 33 countries chosen to collaborate ~ YouTube Symphony Orchestra http://www.youtube.com/user/symphony
    2. 2. <ul><li>What is social multimedia ? </li></ul><ul><li>Social multimedia tools that aid collaboration? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>i.e. Google Docs, wiki writing, viral video </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Discuss social aspects of multimedia collaboration </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Openness </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Remix </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Collaboration 2.0 </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Trends in social multimedia & learning </li></ul>Some ideas re: multimedia
    3. 3. … refers to multiple online formats that foster significant individual participation as well as group collaboration… one that promotes community curation, discussions, debate & re-use of content (remix) What is social multimedia? Social multimedia - Virgin America’s Red In-Flight Entertainment system on the backs of airplane seats. Passengers watch / chat / socialize with other passengers while watching the same satellite TV program http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/In-flight_entertainment
    4. 4. “… free software tools such as GoogleDocs and Zoho introduce students to the notion of collaborative authoring and how ideas can evolve through iterative editing. ... Noodletools helps students create note cards, bibliographies and a place to store research. 2Learn.ca uses a similar approach with its online netlog sheets, concept maps and notepaper sheets. At mySchoolog students organize their school life online, create schedules, organize projects and ...upload various forms of media.&quot; ~ Naslund (2008) Jumpstart collaboration early…
    5. 5. Welcome to my personal learning environment! Watch this 3 min. YouTube video about Symbaloo Symbaloo = To assemble (media) 7 th Grade Student Tells Her Story
    6. 6. To collaborate is to “co – labor” <ul><ul><ul><li>‘… in the long history of humankind those who learned how to collaborate and improvise effectively have prevailed…’ </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Charles Darwin (1809 - 1882) </li></ul></ul></ul>
    7. 7. <ul><li>Can there be meaning without people? No. </li></ul><ul><li>Meaning is made by groups, not individuals </li></ul><ul><li>However, meaning interpreted by individuals & their context(s) </li></ul><ul><li>New meaning is constructed through shared understanding </li></ul><ul><li>Meaning is made persistent in artifacts, digital & otherwise </li></ul>Meaning-making comes from people
    8. 8. ” ...collaborative projects really make for an excellent educational experience ...students bounce ideas off each other and improve each other's writing skils – the process itself teaches them how to work well with others - a valuable skill for everyone...” . Richard Ellwood, Technology & Digital Arts Teacher
    9. 9. Real-time collaborative editing (RTCE) is synchronous (simultaneous), meaning that users can edit the same file at the same time Google Docs for RTCE (real-time editing)
    10. 10. YouTube http:// www.google.com /apps/ MedTing http://medting.com/products-overview/ Metacollab.net (collaboration on collaboration) Podcasting / webcasting Presentation software / screencasting Creating e- spaces for collaboration http://hlwiki.slais.ubc.ca/index.php/Screencasting
    11. 11. <ul><li>Create complex networked multimedia documents without specialized training </li></ul><ul><li>Read Sophie books in a browser without downloading applications </li></ul><ul><li>Comments & discussion inside books </li></ul><ul><li>Embed web browsers in book pages </li></ul><ul><li>Import, embed and export PDF files </li></ul><ul><li>Open Sophie inside other Sophie books </li></ul><ul><li>Frame-based timelines present easy way to create animations </li></ul><ul><li>Sophie allows uploading, managing, and downloading books on a server </li></ul>Sophie 2.0 allows simultaneous reading & collaborative creation of books http://iml.usc.edu/flashVideoPlayer/sophie/sophie_video_2.m4v
    12. 12. Newer collaborative practices <ul><li>Virtual environments, free from physical constraints of real life </li></ul><ul><li>Teleportation creates opportunities for group interaction </li></ul><ul><li>Multi-immersivity allows for greater creativity and exploration </li></ul><ul><li>Twitter is a potential collaboration tool to support back channels (difficult or impossible to replicate in real life) </li></ul><ul><li>Students collaborate in exchange of ideas in (a)synchronous environments </li></ul>
    13. 13. <ul><ul><ul><li>Augmented intelligence </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Collaborative leadership in public health </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Cloud computing </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Distributed cognition </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Collaborative Innovation Network </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Smart mobs </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Swarm creativity </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Wisdom of the crowd </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Social multimedia networking </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>BC Example: PHSA Collaborative Model </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>http://www.phsa.ca/HealthProfessionals/Population-Public-Health/Centres-For-Population-Public-Health/default.htm </li></ul></ul></ul>Trends in collaboration Flash-mob cataloguers: LibraryThing
    14. 14. <ul><li>Encourage collaboration to generate projects </li></ul><ul><li>Use social multimedia to encourage F2F interactions </li></ul><ul><li>Embed health professionals online supported by appropriate tools </li></ul><ul><li>Interact with the public in ways that truly engage </li></ul>In conclusion…

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