Family Connections to Dakota Conflict of 1862

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A family tree that connects my children to people involved in the Dakota Conflict of 1862.

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  • This is very interesting. I am too a decedent of Francois. My grandmother used to tell me the story of the tea quite frequently...which I always found humorous. It's odd...even when I hear the name Selby- it is not him I think of- but my distant patriarch Francois.
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  • Family Connections to Dakota Conflict of 1862

    1. 1. FAMILY CONNECTIONS TO THE DAKOTA CONFLICT OF 1862
    2. 2. NATE - GRACE - NICK GREAT-GREAT-GREAT-GREAT GRANDCHILDREN
    3. 3. CHERYL GREAT-GREAT-GREAT GRAND-DAUGHTER
    4. 4. FRANCES HALLAMEK GREAT-GREAT GRAND-DAUGTHER
    5. 5. AGNES (ROBINETTE) KRONSCHNABLE
    6. 6. AGNES GREAT-GRAND-DAUGHTER OF FRANCOIS GREAT-GRAND-DAUGHTER OF JOSEPH GRAND-DAUGHTER OF MATHILDA & VANOSS DAUGHTER OF LOUIS ABRAHAM WIFE OF ARTHUR KRONSCHNABLE MOTHER TO FRAN GRANDMOTHER TO CHERYL GREAT-GRANDMOTHER TO NATE, NICK AND GRACE
    7. 7. LOUIS ABRAHAM ROBINETTE
    8. 8. LOUIS ABRAHAM GRANDSON OF FRANCOIS GRANDSON OF JOSEPH SON OF MATHILDA & VANOSS HUSBAND OF ROSE MULLEN FATHER TO AGNES GRANDFATHER TO FRAN GREAT-GRANDFATHER TO CHERYL GREAT-GREAT GRANDFATHER TO NATE, NICK AND GRACE
    9. 9. VANOSS NOEL ROBINETTE A.K.A. VANOSSE, VANCOISE,VANOISE
    10. 10. VANOSS SON OF JOSEPH ROBINETTE MARRIED TO MATHILDA LABATHE FATHER OF LOUIS ABRAHAM GRANDFATHER OF AGNES GREAT-GRANDFATHER OF FRANCES GREAT-GREAT GRANDFATHER OF CHERYL GREAT-GREAT-GREAT GRANDFATHER OF NATE, NICK AND GRACE
    11. 11. VANOSS A TEAMSTER AT LOWER SIOUX AGENCY EMPLOYED BY U.S. ARMY DURING CONFLICT
    12. 12. JOSEPH ROBINETTE
    13. 13. JOSEPH ROBINETTE FATHER TO VANOSS GRANDFATHER TO LOUIS ABRAHAM GREAT-GRANDFATHER TO AGNES GREAT-GREAT GRANDFATHER TO FRAN GREAT-GREAT-GREAT GRANDFATHER TO CHERYL GREAT-GREAT-GREAT-GREAT GRANDFATHER TO NATE, NICK AND GRACE
    14. 14. JOSEPH ROBINETTE CAME TO THE U.S. ABOUT 1824 HE WAS A FUR TRADER AND A BLACKSMITH HIS INTENT PAPERS WERE AUGUST 7,1848 AT PRAIRIE DU CHIEN KILLED AT LOWER SIOUX AGENCY, 18 AUGUST 1862
    15. 15. JOSEPH ROBINETTE A narrative assembled and transcribed from what appear to be drafts of an unfinished memoir or narrative written by Mary Robinette Rose. The drafts are found in the manuscript collections of the Minnesota Historical Society (catalog no. P1957, Rose and Borden Family Papers). http://familyimages.smugmug.com/keyword/robinette#214523560_fbYxQ-A-LB Part I Joseph Robinette born Montreal Canada. Came to Minnesota about 1831. Settled in Mendota 1834. Cecile Turpin born in Prairie du Chien [at Lac des Esclaves] 1814. They were married 1840 [1842]. Their children were Harriet, Mary Rose, Louis and Emma. Jane Murray [Kilcool Robert Coursolle] was Cecile Robinette's daugher by a former marriage. [Vanoss was Joseph’s son. Not for certain, but Vanoss may have been adopted by Joseph.] Left Mendota in 1849 [after 1850] to open a trading post and blacksmith shop in Redwood Falls. He learned to speak the Sioux language and was well liked by the Indians. It was on the 18th of August 1862 that two Indian women rushed into our home and told Mother their people/the Sioux were on the warpath and were killing all the white people. They urged her to go to our sister Jane who was expecting her first [third or fourth] child and was alone. They promised to take care of my sister Harriet and me and that my little sister Emma and brother Louis had been picked up outside by friendly squaws who would hide them. They had been out playing, and we didn't know they were gone. by Mary Robinette Rose Daughter of Joseph Robinette Sister of Vanoss Robinette
    16. 16. JOSEPH ROBINETTE Part II Mother had been gone but a few minutes when Chief Little Crow came in. Harriet and I were glad/overjoyed to see him for he was Father's friend and we were sure he wouldn't let any harm come to us. The table was set and breakfast was on the stove in readiness for Father and the two men who boarded with us. Father was an early riser and always went to the blacksmith shop while Mother was preparing breakast. Little Crow had often been a dinner guest in our home so I asked him if would like something to eat. He shook his head and asked for a tomahawk Father had made/promised him. Father was a blacksmith but could make hunting knives and tomahawks which the Indians used for dressing big game. I went to the chest where these things were kept and handed him the tomahawk. Placing the hand that held the tomahawk over his heart, he bowed his head and said in English, "My heart is sad." He then spoke rapidly in Sioux to the Indian women. Harriet could understand some, so I went over to her and asked her what he said. She said she thought we were to be taken care of/to their village. I turned back to Little Crow to ask him if he had seen Father and was astonished for like a phantom he had vanished. We never saw him again. by Mary Robinette Rose Daughter of Joseph Robinette Sister of Vanoss Robinette
    17. 17. JOSEPH ROBINETTE Part III One of the women looked out the door/window and then motioned us to go upstairs where one of the boarders had taken refuge. He was terrified with no chance of escape. It seemed a couple of minutes had passed when we heard the scuffing of moccasined feet and knew that Indians had entered the house. The Indian women were talking and we heard Chief Little Crow's name mentioned. We thought they were giving them Little Crow's message. I was anxious to know if we knew any of them so I crawled on hands and knees to an opening in the floor which was used in winter for a pipe and drum to to heat the upstairs. I peered into the room below, and I gave a gasp of horror. Four pairs of eyes in hideously painted face stared upward, and for the moment, I was paralized with fear and would only stare back. We were told to come down. Harriet was never strong and halfway down the stairs she sat down, and I sat on the step before. They were sitting at the table now and were going eat. One of the squaws told me to help serve them. Harriet kept her place on the stairs while I poured coffee. They ate ravenously. As soon as they were. . . [There is a gap in the narrative.] by Mary Robinette Rose Daughter of Joseph Robinette Sister of Vanoss Robinette
    18. 18. JOSEPH ROBINETTE Part IV The one went over to the trap door that led to the cellar and pulled it up. Two went down to see if anyone was hidden there. They soon came up and the four went outside. No sooner had left when one of the squaws pulled open the cellar door again and motioned Harriet to get our boarder. ?It didn't? take him a minute to ?get to the? cellar. The trap door shut, and Harriet was told to resume her place on the stairs. Then the most repulsive one came in. His face was so painted that his eyes looked like a snake's. He walked over to Harriet and said in broken English, "Who hide," and pointed up. She shook her head and made no offer to get up. He seized her roughly by the arm and pulled her down and dashed up the steps. by Mary Robinette Rose Daughter of Joseph Robinette Sister of Vanoss Robinette
    19. 19. MATHILDA (LABATHE) ROBINETTE
    20. 20. MATHILDA DAUGHTER OF FRANCOIS WIFE OF VANOSS ROBINETTE MOTHER OF LOUIS ABRAHAM GRANDMOTHER TO AGNES GREAT-GRANDMOTHER TO FRAN GREAT-GREAT GRANDMOTHER TO CHERYL GREAT-GREAT-GREAT GRANDMOTHER TO NATE, NICK AND GRACE
    21. 21. MATHILDA MARRIED TO VANOSS ROBINETTE TAKEN CAPTIVE BY DAKOTA AT LOWER SIOUX AGENCY 18 AUGUST 1862
    22. 22. FRANCOIS LABATHE ALSO KNOWN AS FRANCOIS LABATTE
    23. 23. FRANCOIS GRANDSON OF CHIEF WAPASHA I SON OF MICHEL LABATHE AND ANGELIQUE WAPASHA HUSBAND OF JUDITH PROVOST FATHER OF MATHILDA GRANDFATHER TO LOUIS ABRAHAM GREAT-GRANDFATHER TO AGNES GREAT-GREAT GRANDFATHER TO FRAN GREAT-GREAT-GREAT GRANDFATHER TO CHERYL GREAT-GREAT-GREAT-GREAT GRANDFATHER TO NATE, NICK AND GRACE
    24. 24. FRANCOIS BORN 1799 - PRAIRIE DU CHIEN, WI DIED 18 AUGUST 1862 - LOWER SIOUX AGENCY, MN SON OF MICHEL LABATHE AND ANGELIQUE WAPASHA GRANDSON OF CHIEF WAPASHA I (A.K.A. RED LEAF AND WABASHA I) CONSIDERED A SIOUX MIXED-BLOOD
    25. 25. SIOUX MIXED BLOODS RECORDED 1855
    26. 26. FRANCOIS FUR-TRADER COLLEAGUE OF HENRY SIBLEY REPRESENTED FUR COMPANY AT TREATY OF ST. PETERS @ MENDOTA, MN (A.K.A. TREATY WITH THE CHIPPEWA) 1837 SIGNED TRADER’S PAPERS AT TREATY OF TRAVERSE DES SIOUX @ ST. PETER, MN 1851
    27. 27. FRANCOIS KILLED IN DAKOTA CONFLICT OF 1862 ONE OF FIRST PEOPLE KILLED AT LOWER SIOUX AGENCY ONLY PERSON OF MIXED-BLOOD KILLED IN CONFLICT
    28. 28. LOWER SIOUX AGENCY MINNESOTA HISTORICAL SOCIETY SIGN
    29. 29. ABOUT FRANCOIS ...Francois LaBathe, a French half breed fur trader. Francois's mother was said to be a sister of Chief Wapasha II. Francois had 3 wives and fathered at least 16 children. Missionary Stephen Riggs said that Francois was one of the few traders who after marrying Dakota women, considered the marriage permanent. In 1862, [Francois] owned a store at the Lower Sioux Agency across the river from Morton, MN. [Francois] and his family lived in the store. Samuel Pond, a missionary wrote, "The trader's children were the aristocracy of the land. They considered it beneath them to engage in the pursuits of the Indians or in the employment of common laborers. Their position seems to render it fit that they live in better style than the Indians and voyageurs. As a class, they were placed in circumstances very unfavorable to the cultivation of frugal and industrious habits." By John LaBatte, Great-Great Grandson of Francois LaBathe: (http://web.tnics.com/peeversd/Philip%20LaBatte.htm)
    30. 30. LOWER SIOUX AGENCY MINNESOTA HISTORICAL SOCIETY SIGN
    31. 31. ABOUT FRANCOIS The summer of 1862 was very hot. It was the 2nd year in a row that the Indian's crops had failed. The winter had been harsh, the snow deep and the Indians couldn't travel to where the game was. They were starving. Their babies were dying. The annuity payment was late and was expected any day. The trader's warehouses were full of food, but they refused to give any to the Indians on credit. Francois's boss, ordered him not to give the Indians any food. If he did he would be fined. On the morning of August 18, 1862, an old Indian by the name of Iron Shields went about warning the whites to flee. He may have been Philip [LaBatte’s] grandfather. Francois and his family heard the warning and maybe didn't believe it. A few minutes later Francois was shot in his store. Philip may have seen his father killed. Philip's mother said, "After he (Francois) was killed and I dragged my children out from the store and run away amongst the Indians. They took everything out and set the store on fire so everything is lost." The conflict continued for 6 weeks. After the surrender of the hostile and friendly Indians all the men were taken in chains back to the Lower Agency along with the women and children. The trials were held there. Those found guilty were taken to Mankato. The others, including Philip's family, were taken to Fort Snelling. It was a terrible time of harassment and hardship. By John LaBatte, Great-Great Grandson of Francois LaBathe: (http://web.tnics.com/peeversd/Philip%20LaBatte.htm)
    32. 32. FRANCOIS LABATHE’S SUMMER KITCHEN BUILDING AT LOWER SIOUX AGENCY - USED AS U.S. GOVERNMENT JAILHOUSE DURING DAKOTA CONFLICT OF 1862
    33. 33. A STORY ABOUT FRANCOIS “Sibley and LaFramboise had an amiable relationship. Sibley described him years later in his memoirs. “Joseph LaFramboise, who died several years since, was a capital mimic, spoke with fluency four or five different languages, and he was withal an inveterate practical joker. He and Alex Faribault were wont to amuse them selves at the expense of LaBathe, who was a simple minded, honest sort of man, and by no means a match for his tormentors. ”75 Sibley goes on to recount the infamous tea party the three attended at the home of a Captain at Fort Snelling. It was one of those sultry Minnesota summer nights and the three were served copious cups of hot tea. Sibley writes,“It should be premised that Indian etiquette demands on all festive occasions, that the visitor shall leave nothing unconsumed of the meat or drink placed before him. The large cup 29 filled with tea was handed to LaBathe and the contents disposed of. The poor fellow at that time could speak nothing more of English than the imperfect sentence “Tank you.” When his cup was empty, Mrs. G., who was at the head of the table, said in her suave and gentle manner, “Mr. LaBathe, please take some more tea.” LaBathe responded, “Tank you, madam.” Which being interpreted by the waiter to mean an assent, he took the cup and handed it to the hostess, and Mr. LaBathe was forthwith freshly supplied with the hot liquid…Seven great vessels full of the boiling tea were thus successively poured down his throat, LaFramboise and Faribault meantime almost choking with suppressed laughter. For the eighth time the waiter approached to seize the cup, when the aboriginal politeness, which had enabled LaBathe to bear up amid his suffering, gave way entirely. He leapt to his feet and exclaimed in French, “LaFramboise, for the love of God, tell Madame I do not want any more tea!”76 It was an ongoing joke at LaBathe’s expense for years to come. LaFramboise’ humor and his playfulness ingratiated him to others in the company and everyone he dealt with. It helpedhim accommodate to unfamiliar settings and he was not adverse to laughing at himself as the situation required. In one story found among the William Fletcher Papers at the Minnesota Historical Society, an unknown author tells of another mealtime where LaFramboise himself was the butt of the joke.” From: JOSEPH LAFRAMBOISE: A FACTOR OF TREATIES, TRADE, AND CULTURE by JANET TIMMERMAN http://krex.k-state.edu/dspace/bitstream/2097/1132/1/JanetTimmerman2009.pdf 2009
    34. 34. REFERENCES Chief Wabasha Family Tree Minnesota North Star - http://www.state.mn.us/ http://oyate1.proboards.com/index.cgi? board=ancestry&action=display&thread=1547 Dakota Conflict Webquest - http://1862.nativeweb.org/ The Life of Henry H. Sibley http://www.archive.org/stream/cu31924031020591/ **Minnesota Public Radio - http://news.minnesota.publicradio.org/features/ cu31924031020591_djvu.txt 200209/23_steilm_1862-m/ Traverse des Sioux - http://www.mnhs.org/places/sites/tds/ Google Search timeline and statistics for terms "dakota conflict" - http:// index.html www.google.com/search?q=dakota+conflict Minnesota Historical Society - http://www.mnhs.org/index.htm Collection of Memories - Dakota 1795-2007 - http://www.leonardpeltier.net/ documents/historywalk1/HistoryWalkEdited.htm Mankato Wacipi Club - http://www.mahkatowacipi.org/History.htm, http:// www.mahkatowacipi.org/History.htm#Dakota Midwest Weekends - River with a past - http://www.midwestweekends.com/ plan_a_trip/history_heritage/frontier_history/ dakota_conflict_minnesota.html Minnesota Historical Society - http://events.mnhs.org/timepieces/ EventDetail.cfm?EventID=367 Book - Dakota War Whoop: or, Indian massacres and war in Minnesota, of 1862-3  by HAEEIET E. BISHOP McCONKEY, published in 1864 - http:// Spirit Lake Nation - http://www.thinknd.org/resources/IndianStudies/ www.archive.org/stream/dakotwarwhoopori00bishrich/ spiritlake/historical_conflict.html dakotwarwhoopori00bishrich_djvu.txt Voices Education Project - http://www.voiceseducation.org/node/54 Book - Through Dakota Eyes - http://books.google.com/books? Bingham Hall - http://www.bingham-hall.com/ Book - Little Crow - http://books.google.com/books? DakotaConflict1862NewUlmMinnesota.html
    35. 35. REFERENCES Oyate Research Center (Francois LaBatte, grandson of Chief Wabasha) Janet Timmerman - Master’s Thesis http://oyate1.proboards.com/index.cgi? http://krex.k-state.edu/dspace/bitstream/2097/1132/1/ action=display&board=ancestry&thread=1547&page=2 JanetTimmerman2009.pdf Mack Family Tree (Francois LaBatte, fur-trader, killed at Lower Sioux Agency, August 18, 1862, my wife's great-great-great grandfather, son of Angelique Wapahasha, grandson of Chief Redleaf Wapahasha, also known as Wabasha I) http://www.mackreunion.com/genealogy/gp525.htm Mack Family Tree (Mathilda LaBatte, daughter of Francois, wife to Vanoss Robinette, my wife's great-great grandmother) http://www.mackreunion.com/genealogy/gp661.htm Philip Labatte (son of Francois, 1/2 brother to Mathilda) http://web.tnics.com/peeversd/Philip%20LaBatte.htm Vanoss Robinette @ Hallberg Family Data http://www.visi.com/~tth/genealogy/3728.htm Family Geneology Data of Cindy Rose Torfin http://www.fgs-project.com/iowa/r/robinette-joseph-3.html Joseph Robinette https://home.comcast.net/~forefolk/AliceFrancesSheppard/332.htm

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