Introducing Ginglish

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Introducing Ginglish

  1. 1. Introducing Ginglish<br />George Wang<br /> <br />September 1, 2010<br />
  2. 2. Introduction<br />
  3. 3. Ginglishis a language based on English. The major difference between Ginglishand English is in spelling. Ginglishspelling is phonetic with integrity. Ginglishis much easier to read and write than English. It will save the time that people are spending on memorizing English spellings. It will help achieve 100% literacy of the population. <br />
  4. 4. Ginglishuses 26 alphabetical letters used in English. In Ginglish, vowels and consonants are logically defined. Vowels are represented by a, e, i, o, u, r, and combinations of them, where r is a special vowel. There are 29 letters and letter combinations to represent consonants. <br />
  5. 5. Formal Spelling and Straight Spelling<br />
  6. 6. Since the pronunciation of an English word may vary because of different accents or situations, it makes word spellings complicated. There are two ways that Ginglishdeals with spelling.<br />
  7. 7. 1. Formal Spelling<br />The spelling of a word is formed from a common English pronunciation of the English word. When the pronunciation of a word varies, the spelling of the word stays as it is originally defined from the common pronunciation.<br />2. Straight Spelling<br />A word may have multiple spellings if it is pronounced differently. The spellings match the exact pronunciations.<br />
  8. 8. Formal spelling is used to define the spellings of words formally in Ginglish. It unifies the spellings. Straight spelling is more suitable for denoting the exact pronunciations of words. While the basic spelling rules are applicable to both formal spelling and straight spelling, we focus on formal spelling. We use straight spelling when explaining exact pronunciations.<br />
  9. 9. VowelsandConsonants<br />
  10. 10. Ginglishvowels are listed in Table 1, Table 2 and Table 3. <br />Ginglishconsonants are listed in Table 4. <br />
  11. 11.
  12. 12. Table 5 through Table 8 shows examples of vowels and consonants. These examples help understand how the vowels and consonants are defined.<br />
  13. 13. Table 5 Single Letter Vowel Examples<br />Note: r is a special vowel.<br />
  14. 14. Table 6 Examples of Vowels with More Than One Letter without r<br />Note: There are also other combinations such as ea, io, etc. They are not listed because they either can be used directly without a need for special treatment or are not commonly used.<br />
  15. 15. Table 7 Examples of Vowels with More Than One Letter Including r<br />Note: There are also other combinations such as air, eer, etc. They are not listed because they either can be used directly without a need for special treatment or are not commonly used.<br />
  16. 16. Table 8 Consonant Examples<br />
  17. 17. There are English words which have strong forms and weak forms in pronunciations. There are cases in which a Ginglishword spelling is derived from a weak form because the weak form is more common or the derived spelling is briefer or easier to tell from other words. <br />For example, spelling az is derived from a weak form of English word as, ta is from to, an is from an, bi is from be, am is from am, kan is from can, and is from and, wi is from we, hi is from he, shi is from she, hav is from have, and yoo is from you. These words can be pronounced differently in different situations.<br />
  18. 18. Some Rules<br />
  19. 19. Ginglishhas some simple rules. Letter r can be in a vowel, a consonant, or both. Single r following a, e, i, o or u is part of a vowel. Double r (rr) following a, e, i, o or u is generally not part of a vowel. <br />Special words are written as the ways they are and generally starting with an upper case letter. For example, word English is a special word.<br />
  20. 20. Possessive ’s is always ’s. ’s is pronounced differently following different group word endings. Apostrophe ’ by itself following a plural ended with s, x, or z to form a possessive plural is silent. The pronunciations of ’s are shown in Table 9.<br />
  21. 21. Table 9 Pronunciations of ’s<br />
  22. 22. Apostrophe ’ is used with a letter or letters to represent contraction words. Table 10 shows commonly used contraction words. ’s in Table 10 follows the same pronunciation rule as shown in Table 9. Other contraction words in Table 10 pronounce as there is not an apostrophe.<br />
  23. 23. Table 10 Some Generally Used Contraction Words with an Apostrophe<br />
  24. 24. Pronunciation Variations<br />
  25. 25. Since the spelling is unified in formal spelling, the pronunciation of a word may sometimes be different for different English speakers such as American English speakers and British English speakers.<br />
  26. 26. British English speakers pronounce vowels aa and ar the same, such as the ones in words paam and farm, and vowels a and er the same, such as in words koma and kumer. For British English speakers, o is pronounced as o. For American English speakers, o in most words is pronounced as o and in some words may be pronounced differently (e.g. the o in word dog may be pronounced differently from the o in word hot).<br />
  27. 27. ue in some words, such as in word sue, is pronounced as ue by American English speakers and ue or yue by British English speakers. ai in some words, such as in word pais, is pronounced as ai by American English speakers and aa by British English speakers. i at the end of some words, such as in word ikonami, is pronounced as i by British English speakers and i or ee by American English speakers.<br />
  28. 28. Summary<br />
  29. 29. Ginglishis a language based on English. Ginglishspelling is phonetic with integrity. Its vowels and consonants are logically defined. It makes spelling much easier than English.<br /> <br />Ginglishis a great language. It will save people’s time. It will help achieve 100% literacy of the population.<br />
  30. 30. The following is an example of Ginglish:<br />Ginglishizgraet. Its spelingizeezi and injoiabl.<br />
  31. 31. ©2010<br />

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