Social media strategy for communication and dissemination

4,045 views

Published on

How social media, such as FaceBook, Twitter, and Pinterest can support the achievement of specific objectives (e.g. raising awareness about a project or circulating results), with a special focus on education and research context.
Webinar held on June 26th, 2014 at 11:30 AM CET for the App4inno project

Published in: Education, Technology, Business
  • Be the first to comment

Social media strategy for communication and dissemination

  1. 1. SOCIAL MEDIA STRATEGY for communication and dissemination Ada Giannatelli, Politecnico di Milano - METID June, 26th, 2014, 11:30 AM CET Disclaimer: due to the continuing development of social media, no guarantee for the accuracy of information over time can be assumed
  2. 2. Aim of the webinar To inspire the use of social media to communicate project activities and results (dissemination), with a special focus on education and research context Webinar outline 1.Definitions and context 2.Examples 3.Tools 4.How to increase the impact on social media 5.How to manage dissemination on social media Duration: 1 hour
  3. 3. Definitions Social media strategy for dissemination websites and applications that enable users to create and share content or to participate in social networking (Oxford dictionary) otherwise known as Web 2.0 tools accessibility also from mobile devices free or (relatively) low cost options websites and applications that enable users to create and share content or to participate in social networking (Oxford dictionary) otherwise known as Web 2.0 tools accessibility also from mobile devices free or (relatively) low cost options action plan aimed at achieving specific objectives action plan aimed at achieving specific objectives making project results available (European Commission) making project results available (European Commission)
  4. 4. self-explanatory pictures self-explanatory pictures hashtags to increase tweet searchability and virality hashtags to increase tweet searchability and virality circulating in- depth content from website circulating in- depth content from website Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) on Twitter
  5. 5. Online Educa Berlin on Twitter backchannel to enrich the ftof experience backchannel to enrich the ftof experience
  6. 6. hangoutshangouts promotion of new reports and content from website promotion of new reports and content from website World Bank on Google+
  7. 7. promotion of events and news promotion of events and news live chatslive chats promotion of learning offer (e.g. new MOOCs) promotion of learning offer (e.g. new MOOCs) Open University on FaceBook
  8. 8. Effective webinars group on FaceBook community around a EU-funded project (Tempus BLATT project) community around a EU-funded project (Tempus BLATT project)
  9. 9. Media&Learning conference on LinkedIn professional community around a conference (follow-up, enhancing exchanges among stakeholders) professional community around a conference (follow-up, enhancing exchanges among stakeholders)
  10. 10. E-learning 2.0 group on LinkedIn
  11. 11. Erasmus Plus group on LinkedIn professional community around the European Erasmus+ programme professional community around the European Erasmus+ programme
  12. 12. Open Education Europa company page on LinkedIn
  13. 13. disseminating research results with a visual approach disseminating research results with a visual approach British Medical Journal on Pinterest
  14. 14. OBJECTIVES TACTICS INDICATORS Raising awareness about the project Posting about content published on project website: •on project FB page / group •on subjet-related pages/groups Examples: •Global Partnership for Education on FB https://www.facebook.com/globalpartnership •OnlineEducaBerlin on FB https://www.facebook.com/ONLINEEDUCABERLIN • organic reach of FB page / of FB post • engagement (= Likes + Comments + Shares + Clicks) Disseminating project research results Publishing regularly documents and presentations on project channel on SlideShare •Example: EuropeanSchoolnet http://www.slideshare.net/europeanschoolnet Visual magazine on Pinterest •Example: Research of the British Medical Journal http://it.pinterest.com/thebmj/research/ Views and downloads on SlideShare “Tactics” describe the means by which the strategy is carried out operationally Benchmark similar projects to get inspired “Tactics” describe the means by which the strategy is carried out operationally Benchmark similar projects to get inspired Social media strategy objectives
  15. 15. OBJECTIVES TACTICS INDICATORS Promoting ftof events and webinars Tweeting alerts, infos and updates about yet-to-come events •Example: tweets about MOOCamp on France Université Numérique https://twitter.com/universite_num Number of clicks and retweets of specific tweets Enhancing FtoF events Backchannelling on Twitter (providing an alternative channel alongside the event) •Example: backchannel Media&Learning Brussels #mlconf13) Content curation on Scoop.it to circulate and integrate conference contents •Example: http://www.scoop.it/t/online-educa-berlin Number of tweets with backchannel hashtag Social media strategy objectives
  16. 16. OBJECTIVES TACTICS INDICATORS Building a professional community around the project, facilitating interaction among partners and stakeholders Animating a group on LinkedIn •Example: Europeana Network https://www.linkedin.com/groups? home=&gid=4143376&trk=anet_ug_hm Google hangouts •Example: http://live.worldbank.org/google-hangout- youth-and-open-government-in-sports-world-cup) Promoting Google Hangouts on LinkedIn company page •Example: https://www.linkedin.com/company/the-world- bank LinkedIn group members, comments and discussions Google hangouts participants Social media strategy objectives
  17. 17. Some data
  18. 18. Some data impact on information visualization on social media: e.g. text length, picture size impact on information visualization on social media: e.g. text length, picture size
  19. 19. Some data
  20. 20. Some data globally, the fastest growing demographic on Twitter is the 55–64 year age bracket (Oct, 2013 source: ComScore) globally, the fastest growing demographic on Twitter is the 55–64 year age bracket (Oct, 2013 source: ComScore)
  21. 21. Which tools ?
  22. 22. Despite peculiarities of each tool… …the only limit is your creativity • building a professional community around a topic (group) • interacting with experts and stakeholders • Integration with SlideShare and Twitter • most popular • useful to publicize events and to recruit participants to research or e- learning activities • integration with Scoop.it • visual board to combine existing content (e.g. about the project + external related content) • not very used by academia • Hangouts: free videoconference with up to 10 people (useful also in academia) • Extras: integration with Gdocs • Sessions can be recorded • 140 characters • useful to broadcast news and links to blog posts, journal articles, … • useful to engage in conversations (e.g. event backchannel)
  23. 23. Social media: examples of tools
  24. 24. stability over time social media landscape is quickly evolving and many free tools either expire or change their pricing policy; familiar interface popular social media provide an interface target users are already familiar with and signed-up to account federation many social media allow to log onto third-party applications with their existing identity, so that people do not need to sign up separately. (Popular) social media: advantages
  25. 25. sometimes less is more maintaining many social media channels for the same project can be too demanding: sometimes it is better to choose and preside only 2-3 channels backup of social media content export features (or custom procedures) that allow backup of social media content are often lacking or poor: possible loss of materials if the social media fails cautious plans for indicators to set objectives it can be useful to benchmark performances of similar projects (e.g. project FB group members, Twitter followers, etc.) internal policy consider possible internal social media policy and terms of use of each chosen social media possibly indelible contributions of social media users are persistent, which implies that they are stored for others to view and share, also out of the original context Social media: caveat
  26. 26. How to increase the impact on social media ?
  27. 27. Which audience? In the case of education and research projects, we can reasonably consider not only: •teachers •researchers •students …but also other stakeholders, such as: •academia (universities, research institutions) •educational and non-educational institutions at local, regional, national, European, and international level •policy makers •media
  28. 28. Tips to increase the impact of social media Provide connections among dissemination channels •display social media channels on project home page and on project leaflet (if any) •display the other social media channels of the project on each social media channel •advertise project social media channels on personal social media profiles (e.g. LinkedIn, Twitter) Use keywords, hashtags, and tags to increase content virality •upload slides and documents on SlideShare (or other document sharing tools) to increase virality and circulate the link on the other social profiles (e.g. FB, LinkedIn,Twitter) •use hashtags (Twitter) and tags (e.g. SlideShare) consistently: same spelling, punctuation and capitalisation •in case of international / EU-funded projects: mind localisation of tags, hashtags, and keywords •useful tools to get inspired about the most trendy / effective keywords and hashtags: Hashtags.org, Ritetag.com, Google Trends, Top Keywords of SocialMention.com See also the handbook #1 and #2 of the Web2LLP project http://web2llp.eu/training See also the handbook #1 and #2 of the Web2LLP project http://web2llp.eu/training
  29. 29. Writing for dissemination is different than writing an article for a scientific or professional journal: •make text concise and go straight to the point; be sure that information is easy to find (using tags, keywords, and hashtags) •leverage self-explanatory pictures in posts and tweets •highlight key points / findings with bulleted lists •write clear conclusions and recommendations, so that audience knows what to do with the information provided •use clear and understandable language; if you must use technical terminology, define terms in lay language. Also organisations with “bureaucratic” style, such as EU institutions, are adopting a less formal approach Writing style guidelines
  30. 30. How to create an audience on social media
  31. 31. How to create an audience on social media
  32. 32. How to create an audience on social media
  33. 33. How to manage dissemination on social media ?
  34. 34. Phases of dissemination on social media
  35. 35. Some useful tools editing and monitoring tools Hootsuite and Buffer allow to •schedule posts and Tweets for deferred communication •post on multiple social media channels at the same time •monitor the social media channels of the project from a single platform Klout helps to measure the impact of the social media presence utility IFTTT (If This Then That) automates simple tasks, such as automatically adding new Twitter followers in a Google spreadsheet
  36. 36. Useful links …
  37. 37. Designing social media strategy for dissemination http://www.scoop.it/t/social-media-strategy-for-communication-and-dissemination- of-e-learning-e-collaboration-and-research-projects Implementing social media strategy: examples and tools http://www.scoop.it/t/social-media-strategy-examples-and-tools

×