Brain Rules
Takeaways & Quotes
from Dr. John Medina’s
What all presenters need to know
A presentation (of sorts)
by Garr R...
Dr. Medina’s findings discussed
in Brain Rulesare ideas worth
spreading...
So I extracted some quotes
and key points as th...
You can quote me:
Brain Rules is one of the
most informative, engaging,
and useful books of our
time. Required reading for
every educator an...
Here’s your host for
this presentation...
Hello! My name’s Biff.
Agalychnis Callidryas
I’ll be your host for this online
version of the presentation.
Why me? Three reasons: (1) Let my enormous
eyes remind you that vision is the most
dominant sense for you humans.
And (2) allow my remarkable coloring andshape to remind you that you humans arewired to notice differences and patterns...
And (3) let my tiny, primitive brain remind
you that, while I get the most use out of
my brain (as far as I know), you, my...
And (3) let my tiny, primitive brain remind
you that, while I get the most use out of
my brain (as far as I know), you, my...
Introduction
This is Dr. John Medina
This is Dr. John Medina
He knows how these work
Why is he
so happy?
Because his book is
*%$#@ fantastic!
Why is he
so happy?
These takeaways and quotes are based
on three of Dr. Medina’s 12 rules
just
>
These takeaways and quotes are based
on three of Dr. Medina’s 12 rules
just
>
Here they are...
Rule #1
Exercise boosts brain power.
Rule #4
We don’t pay attention to boring things.
Rule #10
Vision trumps all other sen...
Why it matters
If you are in education,
you are in the business
of brain development.
If you are leading a
modern corporation...
you need...
Context
In our world today...
Death-by-PowerPoint is
so common that it’s just
considered “normal.”
Yeah, abnormal...
Death-by-PowerPoint is
so common that it’s just
considered “normal.”
Yeah, abnormal...
Abby Normal?
Sometimes people aren’t even
aware of their own ppt suffering:
Check this guy out...
Nice PowerPoint!
What does Brian Rules say
about presentations?
Dr. Medina on
presentations
Today
>
Toss your PowerPoint
presentations.“ ”— Dr. John Medina
Why?
Do you really have to ask why you
should toss your current slides?
Because,
“ ”says Dr. Medina...
...it’s text-based with six
hierarchical levels of chapters
and subheads—all words.
“
”Get that textoff the screen...
...it’s text-based with six
hierarchical levels of chapters
and subheads—all words.
“
”Get that textoff the screen...
Huh?
Hello, McFly!
It’s not working...
So what?
So stop doing this:
Which leads to this:
Which costs this:
Time
Money
You get what I’m sayin’?
You get what I’m sayin’?
Now let’s look at howBrain Rules can help...
12 Brain rules
We’ll look at #1, #4, and #10.
Brain Rule #1
Exercise boosts brain powerRule #1
and yet...
What are some examples
of perfect “anti-brain”
environments today?
according to Dr. Medina
Classroom pic
Lecture hall
the
Classroom pic
Lecture hall
the
Classroom
the
Classroom pic
The office
Classroom pic
The office
Whoa! Those are
scary environments!
Whoa! Those are
scary environments!
How can you thinkin those spaces?
There is no greater anti-brain
environment than the classroom
and cubicle.
— Dr. John Medina
“
”
There is no greater anti-brain
environment than the classroom
and cubicle.“
”— Dr. John Medina
Amen, brother!
Sure, you know exercise
is good for you...
But exercise is not just good
for general health, it actually
improves cognition.
But exercise is not just good
for general health, it actually
improves cognition.
Two reasons for this...
Exercise increases
oxygen flow into the
brain, which reduces
brain-bound free radicals
...an increase in oxygen
is always a...
Exercise acts directly
on the molecular
machinery of the
brain itself. It increases
neurons’ creation,
survival, and resis...
Reduces Alzheimer’s
Improves long-termImproves reasoning
Helps you solve problems
Improves fluid
Reduces depression
Treats...
What’s this have to do
with presentations?
Two things...
Passively sitting is a very
unnatural thing. Audiences
have no patience for tedium.
Think of the presentation
from your au...
During the preparation stage,
if youʼre struggling with an
idea, if youʼre stuck, then go
for a walk, a run, just move...
2
Evidence suggest we may
even think better if we toss
the couch-potato lifestyle.
...we were born to move.
Hmmm...Potato...
Evidence suggest we may
even think better if we toss
the couch-potato lifestyle.
...we were born to move.
Brain Rule #4
We don’t pay
attention to
boring things
Rule #4
Here’s something else important to
remember in the preparation stage:
Multitasking
is a myth.
Multitasking, when
it comes to paying
attention, is a myth.
“
”— Dr. John Medina
We are biologically incapable of
processing attention-rich inputs
simultaneously.
“
”— Dr. John Medina
Workus interruptus
Take 50% longer to complete a task.
Make 50% more errors.
People who are interrupted:
Take 50% longer to complete a task.
Make 50% more errors.
People who are interrupted:
You’d be more efficientwithout the i...
Hey, being online is great, but
you’d be surprised how much of
your “being connected” is also
“being interrupted.”
When you’re always online
you’re always distracted.“ ”— Dr. John Medina
So the always online
organization is the always
unproductive organization.
— Dr. John Medina
“
”
Yet, most presentations are put
together while doing other things...
Is this you?
Johnson! Where’sthat presentation
I asked for?!!!!
Yes time is an issue, and
each case is different, but...
If the presentation matters, you
need time off the grid to prepare.
If the presentation matters, you
need time off the grid to prepare.
You might want to ditch the
computer too for a while...
Try “going analog” and focusing only
on the presentation in the prep stage.
Is this you?
Big picture vs. details
Structure your presentation
around meaning, and the big
picture. Then support key ideas
with details.
If you want to get the particulars
correct, donʼt start with the details.
Start with the key ideas and, in
hierarchical fa...
The brain
needs a
break.
If keeping someone’s attention
in a lecture was a business, it
would have an 80% failure rate.
“
”— Dr. John Medina
After 10 minutes,
audience attention
steadily drops.
Minutes of class time
10 20 30 40 50
High
Low
Attention
The 10-minute rule
Source: www.brainrules.net/attention
So do something
emotionally relevant at
each 10-minute mark to
regain attention.
Dr. Medina suggests
changing gears every
10 minutes in your
presentation (lecture,
etc.). Tell a relevant
story, show a re...
One more thing about attention...
We’re wired to
notice patterns
Chunking example
IRSYMCAWTFIBMKGBFBI
At first those letter won’t make sense...
But eventually you’ll recognize
chunks you’...
Chunking example
IRSYMCAWTFIBMKGBFBI
Of course, graphic design can help you see the chunks...
Adapted from: www.brainrules...
The brain pays
attention to patterns.
Remembering some-
thing we’ve seen
before (like quick-
sand) is a useful
evolutionar...
What’s the most common
communication mistake?
according to Dr. Medina
Relating too much information,
with not enough time devoted to
connecting the dots. Lot’s of force
feeding, very little di...
The brain doesn’t pay attention to
boring things, and I am as sick of
boring presentations as you are.
“
”— Dr. John Medina
Brain Rule #10
Vision trumps
all other senses
Rule #10
Fact: we have
better recall for
visual information
We are incredible at remembering pictures.
Hear a piece of information,
and three days later you’ll
remember 10% of it.
Add a picture and you’ll
remember 65%.
Oral 10%
Visual
Oral &
Visual
35%
65%
6x
Source: Najjar, LJ (1998) Principles of educational multimedia user interface des...
Why is vision such a big
deal to us? Perhaps
because it’s how we’ve
always apprehended major
threats, food supplies and
re...
Why is vision such a big
deal to us? Perhaps
because it’s how we’ve
always apprehended major
threats, food supplies and
re...
Pictures beat text
Recognition soars with pictures
0% 50% 100%
pictures only
text only
source: www.brainrules.net/vision
Various studies show...
Pictures beat text...because
reading is so inefficient for us. We
have to identify certain features in
the letters to be ab...
So what have we learned?
Let’s see those three rules again...
Rule #1
Exercise boosts brain power.
Rule #4
We don’t pay attention to boring things.
Rule #10
Vision trumps all other sen...
Review
Rule #1
Exercise boosts brain power.
Review✓ Our brains were built for walking/moving!
✓ To improve your thinking skills, ...
Rule #4
We don’t pay attention to boring things.
✓ No multitasking. When it comes to
attention, it’s only one thing at a t...
Review
✓ Vision is our dominant sense, using half of
the brain’s resources.
✓We learn/remember best through pictures
compa...
What do these 3 rules mean for the
world of presentation? And for the
world of work and school in general?
Question:
All 1...
John Medina’s 12 Brain rules
>>You can download this list in PDF
from the Brain Rules website:
www.brainrules.net/the-rules
John Medina’s 12 Brain rules
>
Want to learn more?
Then get this book...
www.brainrules.net
Includes a great DVD too!
And go to this website:
About these slides
All images from www.istockphoto.com,
except for images of Dr. Medina which
are available in the Brain R...
These slides were produced by Garr Reynolds
in his home in Osaka Japan. Software used
was Apple’s Keynote (but PowerPoint ...
These slides were produced by Garr Reynolds
in his home in Osaka Japan. Software used
was Apple’s Keynote (but PowerPoint ...
Brain Rules (What all presenters need to know?)
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Brain Rules (What all presenters need to know?)

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Brain Rules is one of the most informative, engaging, and useful books of our time. Required reading for every educator and every business person. My favorite book of 2008!

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Brain Rules (What all presenters need to know?)

  1. 1. Brain Rules Takeaways & Quotes from Dr. John Medina’s What all presenters need to know A presentation (of sorts) by Garr Reynolds
  2. 2. Dr. Medina’s findings discussed in Brain Rulesare ideas worth spreading... So I extracted some quotes and key points as they relate to my field — presentation — to help you spread the word.
  3. 3. You can quote me:
  4. 4. Brain Rules is one of the most informative, engaging, and useful books of our time. Required reading for every educator and every business person. My favorite book of 2008! “ ”— Garr Reynolds Presentation Zen
  5. 5. Here’s your host for this presentation...
  6. 6. Hello! My name’s Biff. Agalychnis Callidryas
  7. 7. I’ll be your host for this online version of the presentation.
  8. 8. Why me? Three reasons: (1) Let my enormous eyes remind you that vision is the most dominant sense for you humans.
  9. 9. And (2) allow my remarkable coloring andshape to remind you that you humans arewired to notice differences and patterns...
  10. 10. And (3) let my tiny, primitive brain remind you that, while I get the most use out of my brain (as far as I know), you, my friend, could learn to use your massive, evolved brain much more effectively...
  11. 11. And (3) let my tiny, primitive brain remind you that, while I get the most use out of my brain (as far as I know), you, my friend, could learn to use your massive, evolved brain much more effectively... Right, on with the preso...
  12. 12. Introduction
  13. 13. This is Dr. John Medina
  14. 14. This is Dr. John Medina He knows how these work
  15. 15. Why is he so happy?
  16. 16. Because his book is *%$#@ fantastic! Why is he so happy?
  17. 17. These takeaways and quotes are based on three of Dr. Medina’s 12 rules just >
  18. 18. These takeaways and quotes are based on three of Dr. Medina’s 12 rules just > Here they are...
  19. 19. Rule #1 Exercise boosts brain power. Rule #4 We don’t pay attention to boring things. Rule #10 Vision trumps all other senses.
  20. 20. Why it matters
  21. 21. If you are in education, you are in the business of brain development. If you are leading a modern corporation... you need to know how brains work. “ ”— Dr. John Medina
  22. 22. Context
  23. 23. In our world today...
  24. 24. Death-by-PowerPoint is so common that it’s just considered “normal.” Yeah, abnormal...
  25. 25. Death-by-PowerPoint is so common that it’s just considered “normal.” Yeah, abnormal... Abby Normal?
  26. 26. Sometimes people aren’t even aware of their own ppt suffering: Check this guy out...
  27. 27. Nice PowerPoint!
  28. 28. What does Brian Rules say about presentations?
  29. 29. Dr. Medina on presentations Today >
  30. 30. Toss your PowerPoint presentations.“ ”— Dr. John Medina
  31. 31. Why?
  32. 32. Do you really have to ask why you should toss your current slides?
  33. 33. Because, “ ”says Dr. Medina...
  34. 34. ...it’s text-based with six hierarchical levels of chapters and subheads—all words. “ ”Get that textoff the screen...
  35. 35. ...it’s text-based with six hierarchical levels of chapters and subheads—all words. “ ”Get that textoff the screen... Huh?
  36. 36. Hello, McFly!
  37. 37. It’s not working...
  38. 38. So what?
  39. 39. So stop doing this:
  40. 40. Which leads to this:
  41. 41. Which costs this:
  42. 42. Time Money
  43. 43. You get what I’m sayin’?
  44. 44. You get what I’m sayin’? Now let’s look at howBrain Rules can help...
  45. 45. 12 Brain rules We’ll look at #1, #4, and #10.
  46. 46. Brain Rule #1
  47. 47. Exercise boosts brain powerRule #1
  48. 48. and yet...
  49. 49. What are some examples of perfect “anti-brain” environments today? according to Dr. Medina
  50. 50. Classroom pic Lecture hall the
  51. 51. Classroom pic Lecture hall the
  52. 52. Classroom the
  53. 53. Classroom pic The office
  54. 54. Classroom pic The office
  55. 55. Whoa! Those are scary environments!
  56. 56. Whoa! Those are scary environments! How can you thinkin those spaces?
  57. 57. There is no greater anti-brain environment than the classroom and cubicle. — Dr. John Medina “ ”
  58. 58. There is no greater anti-brain environment than the classroom and cubicle.“ ”— Dr. John Medina Amen, brother!
  59. 59. Sure, you know exercise is good for you...
  60. 60. But exercise is not just good for general health, it actually improves cognition.
  61. 61. But exercise is not just good for general health, it actually improves cognition. Two reasons for this...
  62. 62. Exercise increases oxygen flow into the brain, which reduces brain-bound free radicals ...an increase in oxygen is always accompanied by an uptick in mental sharpness. ”— Dr. John Medina “ 1
  63. 63. Exercise acts directly on the molecular machinery of the brain itself. It increases neurons’ creation, survival, and resistance to damage and stress. ”— Dr. John Medina “ 2
  64. 64. Reduces Alzheimer’s Improves long-termImproves reasoning Helps you solve problems Improves fluid Reduces depression Treats dementia And more... More brain benefits: BENEFITS intelligence risk by 50% memory
  65. 65. What’s this have to do with presentations? Two things...
  66. 66. Passively sitting is a very unnatural thing. Audiences have no patience for tedium. Think of the presentation from your audienceʼs point of view. 1
  67. 67. During the preparation stage, if youʼre struggling with an idea, if youʼre stuck, then go for a walk, a run, just move... 2
  68. 68. Evidence suggest we may even think better if we toss the couch-potato lifestyle. ...we were born to move.
  69. 69. Hmmm...Potato... Evidence suggest we may even think better if we toss the couch-potato lifestyle. ...we were born to move.
  70. 70. Brain Rule #4
  71. 71. We don’t pay attention to boring things Rule #4
  72. 72. Here’s something else important to remember in the preparation stage: Multitasking is a myth.
  73. 73. Multitasking, when it comes to paying attention, is a myth. “ ”— Dr. John Medina
  74. 74. We are biologically incapable of processing attention-rich inputs simultaneously. “ ”— Dr. John Medina
  75. 75. Workus interruptus
  76. 76. Take 50% longer to complete a task. Make 50% more errors. People who are interrupted:
  77. 77. Take 50% longer to complete a task. Make 50% more errors. People who are interrupted: You’d be more efficientwithout the interruptions
  78. 78. Hey, being online is great, but you’d be surprised how much of your “being connected” is also “being interrupted.”
  79. 79. When you’re always online you’re always distracted.“ ”— Dr. John Medina
  80. 80. So the always online organization is the always unproductive organization. — Dr. John Medina “ ”
  81. 81. Yet, most presentations are put together while doing other things... Is this you?
  82. 82. Johnson! Where’sthat presentation I asked for?!!!!
  83. 83. Yes time is an issue, and each case is different, but...
  84. 84. If the presentation matters, you need time off the grid to prepare.
  85. 85. If the presentation matters, you need time off the grid to prepare. You might want to ditch the computer too for a while...
  86. 86. Try “going analog” and focusing only on the presentation in the prep stage. Is this you?
  87. 87. Big picture vs. details
  88. 88. Structure your presentation around meaning, and the big picture. Then support key ideas with details.
  89. 89. If you want to get the particulars correct, donʼt start with the details. Start with the key ideas and, in hierarchical fashion, form the details around these larger notions. “ ”— Dr. John Medina Good advice, but how long can peoplepay attention to your talk?
  90. 90. The brain needs a break.
  91. 91. If keeping someone’s attention in a lecture was a business, it would have an 80% failure rate. “ ”— Dr. John Medina
  92. 92. After 10 minutes, audience attention steadily drops.
  93. 93. Minutes of class time 10 20 30 40 50 High Low Attention The 10-minute rule Source: www.brainrules.net/attention
  94. 94. So do something emotionally relevant at each 10-minute mark to regain attention.
  95. 95. Dr. Medina suggests changing gears every 10 minutes in your presentation (lecture, etc.). Tell a relevant story, show a relevant video, do a relevant activity, etc.
  96. 96. One more thing about attention...
  97. 97. We’re wired to notice patterns
  98. 98. Chunking example IRSYMCAWTFIBMKGBFBI At first those letter won’t make sense... But eventually you’ll recognize chunks you’ve seen before.
  99. 99. Chunking example IRSYMCAWTFIBMKGBFBI Of course, graphic design can help you see the chunks... Adapted from: www.brainrules.net/attention
  100. 100. The brain pays attention to patterns. Remembering some- thing we’ve seen before (like quick- sand) is a useful evolutionary trait. “ ”— Dr. John Medina
  101. 101. What’s the most common communication mistake? according to Dr. Medina
  102. 102. Relating too much information, with not enough time devoted to connecting the dots. Lot’s of force feeding, very little digestion. “ ”— Dr. John Medina
  103. 103. The brain doesn’t pay attention to boring things, and I am as sick of boring presentations as you are. “ ”— Dr. John Medina
  104. 104. Brain Rule #10
  105. 105. Vision trumps all other senses Rule #10
  106. 106. Fact: we have better recall for visual information
  107. 107. We are incredible at remembering pictures.
  108. 108. Hear a piece of information, and three days later you’ll remember 10% of it.
  109. 109. Add a picture and you’ll remember 65%.
  110. 110. Oral 10% Visual Oral & Visual 35% 65% 6x Source: Najjar, LJ (1998) Principles of educational multimedia user interface design (via Brain Rules by John Medina, 2008) Rule of thumb 3x
  111. 111. Why is vision such a big deal to us? Perhaps because it’s how we’ve always apprehended major threats, food supplies and reproductive opportunity. “ ”— Dr. John Medina
  112. 112. Why is vision such a big deal to us? Perhaps because it’s how we’ve always apprehended major threats, food supplies and reproductive opportunity. “ ”— Dr. John Medina Can I eat it? Will it eat me? Can I mate with it? Will it mate with me? Have I seen it before?
  113. 113. Pictures beat text
  114. 114. Recognition soars with pictures 0% 50% 100% pictures only text only source: www.brainrules.net/vision Various studies show that recognition doubles for a picture compared with text. “ ”— Dr. John Medina
  115. 115. Pictures beat text...because reading is so inefficient for us. We have to identify certain features in the letters to be able to read them. That takes time. “ ” — Dr. John Medina
  116. 116. So what have we learned?
  117. 117. Let’s see those three rules again...
  118. 118. Rule #1 Exercise boosts brain power. Rule #4 We don’t pay attention to boring things. Rule #10 Vision trumps all other senses.
  119. 119. Review
  120. 120. Rule #1 Exercise boosts brain power. Review✓ Our brains were built for walking/moving! ✓ To improve your thinking skills, move! ✓ Exercise gets blood to the brain, bringing it glucose and oxygen. ✓ Aerobic exercise 2x/week halves the risk of general dementia, reduces risk of Alzheimer’s by 60%. ✓ Exercise is just about the best thing you can do for yourself says Dr. Medina.
  121. 121. Rule #4 We don’t pay attention to boring things. ✓ No multitasking. When it comes to attention, it’s only one thing at a time. ✓ We are better at seeing patterns, abstracting meaning than recording details. ✓ Tapping people’s emotions helps them learn. ✓ People start to fade after 10 minutes. Get them back by telling stories, examples, and targeting their emotions. Review
  122. 122. Review ✓ Vision is our dominant sense, using half of the brain’s resources. ✓We learn/remember best through pictures compared to text or spoken words. ✓Try to communicate more with pictures. ✓Toss your current PowerPoint slides. Rule #10 Vision trumps all other senses.
  123. 123. What do these 3 rules mean for the world of presentation? And for the world of work and school in general? Question: All 12 rules at a glance
  124. 124. John Medina’s 12 Brain rules >>You can download this list in PDF from the Brain Rules website: www.brainrules.net/the-rules
  125. 125. John Medina’s 12 Brain rules >
  126. 126. Want to learn more? Then get this book... www.brainrules.net Includes a great DVD too! And go to this website:
  127. 127. About these slides All images from www.istockphoto.com, except for images of Dr. Medina which are available in the Brain Rules media kit here: www.brainrules.net/mediakit
  128. 128. These slides were produced by Garr Reynolds in his home in Osaka Japan. Software used was Apple’s Keynote (but PowerPoint would’ve done the trick as well) and a bit of Photoshop. GARR REYNOLDS www.presentationzen.com Checkout the PZ website! These slides were produced by Garr Reynolds in his home in Osaka, Japan. Software used was Apple’s Keynote (but PowerPoint would’ve done the trick as well) and a bit of Photoshop. GARR REYNOLDS www.presentationzen.com Checkout the PZ website!
  129. 129. These slides were produced by Garr Reynolds in his home in Osaka Japan. Software used was Apple’s Keynote (but PowerPoint would’ve done the trick as well) and a bit of Photoshop. GARR REYNOLDS www.presentationzen.com Checkout the PZ website! どうもありがとう Domo Arigatou

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