Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
PoetryDedicationProjectA dedication to my Mother and Sisterby Anfernee Neal
Dedication
Dedication• To My Sister: I can‟t believe how fast time has gone. Iremember when we were practically babies; you were born...
Classic Poem 1“The Road Not Taken” by Robert FrostTwo roads diverged in a yellow wood,And sorry I could not travel bothAnd...
Explication 1• The Road Not Taken conveys the message to never follow behind others. “I took theone less traveled by/ and ...
Classic Poem 2“Nothing Gold Can Stay” by Robert FrostNatures first green is gold,Her hardest hue to hold.Her early leafs a...
Explication 2• Robert Frost’s “Nothing Gold Can Stay” was published in the New Hampshire collection in October of 1923. Th...
Classic Poem 3“Hope is the thing with feathers” (254) byEmily Dickinson• Hope is the thing with feathersThat perches in th...
Explication 3• “Hope is the thing with feathers” by Emily Dickinson uses the best “wording” of any poem I’ve read thus far...
Classic Poem 4“We Real Cool” by GWENDOLYN BROOKS• THE POOL PLAYERS.• SEVEN AT THE GOLDEN SHOVEL.• We real cool. We• Left s...
Explication 4• “We Real Cool” by poet Gwendolyn Brooks was published in her 1960 book, “The Bean Eaters”.This poem is the ...
Classic Poem 5“Thanks” by W. S. Merwin• Listenwith the night falling we are saying thank youwe are stopping on the bridges...
Explication 5• “Thanks” by W. S. Merwin is a free verse poem that questions our “hearing” and „listening”. I lovethe appro...
Original Poem 1“If Only” by Anfernee Neal• If Only• Torment were love,• And love,• Was never pain• If only• Pain were joy,...
Dedication 1• “If Only” was written June 19th, 2012 and remains today one of my most“obscure” pieces of poetry. I dedicate...
Original Poem 2“We Saw” by Anfernee Neal• We saw: Driver’s licenses• Not the perennial lines• We saw: Money• Not jobs, tax...
Dedication 2• “We saw” was written May 12th, 2013. I dedicate this poem (to my sister) because it speaksof the inevitabili...
Original Poem 3“Writers Block” (Cinquain) by Anfernee Neal• Affliction• Dire, stressful• Blocking, obstructing, tiring• Lo...
Dedication 3• “Writers Block (Cinquain)” was written May 12th, 2013. I wrote this poembecause of the difficulty to write a...
Original Poem 4“Is This Love” by Anfernee Neal• Is this love• why do I feel deceit• my hearts at war while• you’re at peac...
Dedication 4• “Is this love” was written February 14th, 2012 (Valentine‟s Day). It‟salso my second poem ever written. I wa...
Original Poem 5“Graduation” by Anfernee Neal• A final ceremony, we-• Gather honored, our departure-• From the nest, we are...
Dedication 5• “Graduation” was written May 9th, 2013. This poem is my most metaphoricalpoem to date because of the figurat...
Classic Poem 6“Mother to Son” by Langston HughesWell, son, I’ll tell you:Life for me ain’t been no crystal stair.It’s had ...
Classic Poem 7“Dreams” by Langston Hughes• Hold fast to dreams• For if dreams die• Life is a broken-winged bird• That cann...
Survey Link: Give your feedback!(Due May 29th, 2013 at 11:59 PM)• https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/viewform?formkey=dGZ...
Bibliography (poems)• Brooks, Gwendolyn. “We Real Cool” –Poets.org, http://www.poets.org/viewmedia.php/prmMID/15433, Acade...
Bibliography (Photos)• BrokenWing. Photograph: http://joon.be/old/blog2010/index.php?show=27.By Joon.be. N.d. Web. 25 May ...
Bibliography (Photos) II• Thank You. Photograph :http://panoramapdg.com/when-thank-you-is-more-than-two-words/. By Stewart...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Digital.poetry.proj

661 views

Published on

Digital Poetry Project

Published in: Design
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Digital.poetry.proj

  1. 1. PoetryDedicationProjectA dedication to my Mother and Sisterby Anfernee Neal
  2. 2. Dedication
  3. 3. Dedication• To My Sister: I can‟t believe how fast time has gone. Iremember when we were practically babies; you were bornand I held you for the first time. I was the only one you cried at(haha), fast forward to when you were 3 and I was 6 or 7 andwe‟d argue over whose turn it was to watch either Sponge Bobor Courage the Cowardly Dog. Now you‟re entering HighSchool; the decision making, opportunity and responsibilitystage of life. Not to mention the beginning of adulthood. Thenext four years will speed by faster than the fourteen years ittook to reach this point, and I couldn‟t be more PROUD ofyou.
  4. 4. Classic Poem 1“The Road Not Taken” by Robert FrostTwo roads diverged in a yellow wood,And sorry I could not travel bothAnd be one traveler, long I stoodAnd looked down one as far as I couldTo where it bent in the undergrowth;Then took the other, as just as fair,And having perhaps the better claim,Because it was grassy and wanted wear;Though as for that the passing thereHad worn them really about the same,And both that morning equally layIn leaves no step had trodden black.Oh, I kept the first for another day!Yet knowing how way leads on to way,I doubted if I should ever come back.I shall be telling this with a sighSomewhere ages and ages hence:Two roads diverged in a wood, and I--I took the one less traveled by,And that has made all the difference.
  5. 5. Explication 1• The Road Not Taken conveys the message to never follow behind others. “I took theone less traveled by/ and that has made all the difference/ - Robert Frost”. This is alesson many should carry though life and its many hardships.• The speaker of Robert Frost‟s “The Road Not Taken” almost sounds as if it‟s the poethimself. However that‟s not the case. Robert Frost creates a character that is passingthrough a wooded area and comes to a crossroad. That character has to make adecision on which one path he will travel, though the character‟s wish is to travel bothpaths.• “The Road Not Taken” uses four cinquain verses (Cinquain: a 5 line verse/poem) anda rhyme scheme which follows the ABAAB format (Rhyme scheme: The last word inevery line of the poem that rhymes). Robert Frost has a unique form of wordingthroughout the poem which may be due to the poems syllable range. From looking atthe poem we can see every line is fairly equal in length, and as we scan the poem(scan: searching for stressed and unstressed syllables) we find little poetic devices, norepetition, no assonance or consonance. The poem does make a good example of aconceit, which is an extended metaphor/ analogy which lasts throughout the entirepoem.• Last but not least, the poem flows gracefully thanks to its rhyme scheme and syllablerange. The visual appearance is of your normal poem but the construction is not. Wehave four stanzas, the first 3 of which paint vivid images using nouns, verbs, andadjectives such as diverge, undergrowth, grassy, worn, travel and more. Then thefourth stanza which portrays an idea other than a picture; that idea being to followyour own path instead of the path others have followed.
  6. 6. Classic Poem 2“Nothing Gold Can Stay” by Robert FrostNatures first green is gold,Her hardest hue to hold.Her early leafs a flower;But only so an hour.Then leaf subsides to leaf.So Eden sank to grief,So dawn goes down to day.Nothing gold can stay.
  7. 7. Explication 2• Robert Frost’s “Nothing Gold Can Stay” was published in the New Hampshire collection in October of 1923. Thepoem is very brief yet there’s so much spoken of in its text. The speaker uses a high degree of figurative languagewhich is visible in the first line. The speaker also generates nice scenes of “nature” throughout the poem. As we readthoroughly we see a double entendre (which I’ll speak on later). We’ll also decipher the speaker’s hidden message.That is: nothing is forever, everything has an end.• The entire “Nothing Gold Can Stay” poem is constructed of couplets, four couplets to be exact (Couplet: tworhyming lines). We begin the first couplet with the speaker comparing the green of nature to gold and how hard it is fornature to maintain itself. This can be because nature overtime can erode. Plants wither, trees collapse, and the vibrantgreen grass overtime becomes dull and muddy. In couplet 2 (lines 3 and 4) the speaker follows up with the previouscouplet of nature saying “Her early leaf’s a flower”. Couplet 3 is where we find the setting of the poem (or at leastwhat the setting is based upon) and the breed of “flower”. The speaker mentions leaves subsiding (falling) which canonly be of a tree; and it all makes sense when we reach the word “Eden”. Eden is a garden dating back to the Genesischapter of the Holy Bible. Eden is also home of the Tree of Knowledge which I believe the poet is referring to. This 3rdstanza also applies to the collapse of this tree. The leaves continually fell (remember this “tree” is still referred to as aflower, so the leaves would take the place of petals). Couplet four concludes the poem with the sun setting and darkapproaching, and the dying of nature (and its plants).• The poem is very concise yet so full of imagery and packed with information. It’s almost as a puzzle. One stanzaleads into the next, and sometimes we have to recede to previous stanzas to fully understand its meaning. Robert Frostdid a great job on the alliteration though the entire piece. There is a great use of metaphor as the poet strayed fromusing similes.
  8. 8. Classic Poem 3“Hope is the thing with feathers” (254) byEmily Dickinson• Hope is the thing with feathersThat perches in the soul,And sings the tune without the words,And never stops at all,And sweetest in the gale is heard;And sore must be the stormThat could abash the little birdThat kept so many warm.Ive heard it in the chillest landAnd on the strangest sea;Yet, never, in extremity,It asked a crumb of me.
  9. 9. Explication 3• “Hope is the thing with feathers” by Emily Dickinson uses the best “wording” of any poem I’ve read thus far. EmilyDickinson utilizes her full lyrical ability which is visible in her word choice. When we read the poem it’s almost as ifwe’re singing in our heads or out loud (depending on how you choose to read). I’ve always been an Emily Dickinson fanso when finding this poem for the first time, I could not be disappointed.• Emily Dickinson’s “Hope is the thing with feathers” is told by the poet herself. The story begins in the openingstanza. The first stanza opens with “Hope is the thing with feathers”. We all picture this to refer to some breed of bird(possibly a dove) Emily Dickinson goes on to say this bird (hope) is what lives inside our souls, and it’s vitality is alwaysthere in the darkest moments. This is very creative as birds like to sing very early in the morning when the sun has yetto have risen. Our second stanza further elaborates on the first. We find out what the breed of bird is Emily Dickinsonmentions but there’s something special about the “gale”. The word is brilliantly chosen as it represents both the gale(bird) and gale (wind gust) which explains the “sore storm” in line 6. In lines 7 and 8 we’re told of the gale’sabashment, which can only mean the storm scared him off. Remember the gale (bird) symbolized “hope”. Stanza 3concludes the poem with a ray of strength expanding on one idea. Continuing from the 2nd stanza is the “storm”. Thepoet concludes this masterpiece with another key word, extremity. This word amped up line 11 to say the storm(which scared the gale from the hearts of many) NEVER crossed her path. In other words this storm never swayed thegale (hope) in her heart.• Emily Dickinson composed this poem of 3 quatrains, each following an ABAB format (Quatrain: a four linedverse/poem). Every verse represents a change in image, thought or idea. With that said Stanza 1 shows the image of aperched bird in the souls of man. Stanza 2 shows the image of a fierce storm that frightens the bird from the souls.(The storm also symbols adversity.) Stanza 3 the idea of strength, which is why the storm (adversity) doesn’t want tocross paths that never.
  10. 10. Classic Poem 4“We Real Cool” by GWENDOLYN BROOKS• THE POOL PLAYERS.• SEVEN AT THE GOLDEN SHOVEL.• We real cool. We• Left school. We• Lurk late. We• Strike straight. We• Sing sin. We• Thin gin. We• Jazz June. We• Die soon.
  11. 11. Explication 4• “We Real Cool” by poet Gwendolyn Brooks was published in her 1960 book, “The Bean Eaters”.This poem is the definition of concise. Containing less than thirty words, Gwendolyn Brooks portrays agroup of trouble making teens. We also take note of the repetition and short lines used giving thepoem a jazz like sound, while the “we’s” used connect each stanza. In story the poem doesn’t call forhuge explication, it’s very straight forward and many young kids (teenagers) can decipher it withoutdifficulty. I should add the unique wording of the poem gives us an idea of who the speaker is.(doesn’t It sound like a teenager? The speaker doesn’t use proper English. Nowadays slang has grownmore popular being used in songs, movies, video games etc.)• “We Real Cool” is a poem constructed of four couplets. The 1st couplet gives us informationreferring to school, and leaving school. This gives an idea that the speaker is a student. The 2ndcouplet confirms the speaker is a student and tells about the speaker and his friends staying out latenights and getting into brawls. 3rd couplet follows the 2nd couplets mischievous actions by using theword “sin” and tells the reader about the teens drinking (which I’m sure was illegal back then as it isnow.) The 4th stanza opens with the words “jazz June” commonly graduations are held in June andshortly after graduation the poem concludes with the deaths of the teens.• Gwendolyn Brooks uses internal rhyme through the poem along with the common end rhyme“we”. This supports the poem’s structure (a bouncy, jazz like flow). She also utilizes alliterationbeginning in the 2nd stanza to 4th and consonance from the 1st stanza to 4th. The theme never straysas concentration remains on the teens and their actions.
  12. 12. Classic Poem 5“Thanks” by W. S. Merwin• Listenwith the night falling we are saying thank youwe are stopping on the bridges to bow for the railingswe are running out of the glass roomswith our mouths full of food to look at the skyand say thank youwe are standing by the water looking outin different directions.• back from a series of hospitals back from a muggingafter funerals we are saying thank youafter the news of the deadwhether or not we knew them we are saying thank youlooking up from tables we are saying thank youin a culture up to its chin in shameliving in the stench it has chosen we are saying thank youover telephones we are saying thank youin doorways and in the backs of cars and in elevatorsremembering wars and the police at the back doorand the beatings on stairs we are saying thank youin the banks that use us we are saying thank youwith the crooks in office with the rich and fashionableunchanged we go on saying thank you thank you• with the animals dying around usour lost feelings we are saying thank youwith the forests falling faster than the minutesof our lives we are saying thank youwith the words going out like cells of a brainwith the cities growing over us like the earthwe are saying thank you faster and fasterwith nobody listening we are saying thank youwe are saying thank you and wavingdark though it is
  13. 13. Explication 5• “Thanks” by W. S. Merwin is a free verse poem that questions our “hearing” and „listening”. I lovethe approach to this piece by W. S. Merwin to use a “reverse thinking” tactic. Throughout thispoem we hear the repetition of “thank you”. This repetition happens to be our only lead to findingthe true meaning of the poem.• “Thanks” is composed of four verses. Since no two verses use the same rhyme scheme (everyverse has a different scheme) the poem is free verse. The non-rhyme scheme had given the poem aspoken word feel and vibe, epically with the repeated “thank you”. The story is intricate takingvarious reads but in the end it was worth finding the “message”. In stanza 1 we begin with theword “listen”, which gives the impression this is the poet speaking to you, the reader. We precedeto line 2, where night is mentioned and this is the key to our poem (well, at least the fourth verse).Everything from line 3 to the second stanza requires no strenuous thought. The tone of the poemchanges as the poet starts giving thanks to present day negativity. For example Merwin says “andthe beatings on stairs we are saying thank you”. From this point throughout stanza 4 we noticethese “thank you‟s” that are just illogical to be thankful for, and the only hint to solving thismystery is line 23‟s “lost feelings”… could this be why the poet is giving thanks without the properunderstanding or caring of the phrase?• What we start to see near the middle (going to the end) is a carless, dried out repeated phrase thatshows no meaning by the person who utters it. This is the message I feel W. S Merwin is tryingconvey to his audience.
  14. 14. Original Poem 1“If Only” by Anfernee Neal• If Only• Torment were love,• And love,• Was never pain• If only• Pain were joy,• And joy,• Was eternal• If only• Death had a shield,• A barrier,• To shatter grievance• And if only• LIFE were flawless• Would there be• A need• To die?
  15. 15. Dedication 1• “If Only” was written June 19th, 2012 and remains today one of my most“obscure” pieces of poetry. I dedicate this poem because of its “mystery”and many ways of looking at the situations and events that occur. This isa poem where many people will develop many opinions and views. It‟s aperfect addition to my project bringing the important assets of life with atwist. What I try explaining through the entire poem is pain and its manyforms (I always try my best to convey a specific emotion rather than justsaying the basic. There are many forms of pain; heartbreak, loss, anddeath are a small few.)• I chose to dedicate this poem because it says we need the non-perfectaspects of life. Imagine a world of perfection; no flaws, no pain… I mustadmit it seems nice, but if we live without pain and flaws on Earth wouldthere be a need to have the same thing in an afterlife? “If Only” is full ofideas and themes that will make the reader think to comprehend it‟severy theme. And every time you read the poem you‟ll discoversomething different in YOUR own logic.
  16. 16. Original Poem 2“We Saw” by Anfernee Neal• We saw: Driver’s licenses• Not the perennial lines• We saw: Money• Not jobs, taxes or fines• We saw: College• Not twenty page applications• We saw: Adulthood• Not its complications• We saw: Friendships• Not deception or departure• We saw: Love• Not heartbreak and torture• We saw: All we wanted• And that was given• We saw: Growing• Can’t be prevented
  17. 17. Dedication 2• “We saw” was written May 12th, 2013. I dedicate this poem (to my sister) because it speaksof the inevitabilities of growing. The process of writing “We saw” was difficult because I had toreminisce on my teen years. I commonly write poetry based on “the present” because I feelyou live more in that moment. Not to mention you have a clear view of what emotion or imageyou want to paint for your readers.• It’s amazing how time flies like a comet over our heads, and most people never live in themoments they’re given. Sis, take the time to live in the moment for the upcoming four years!And for all the previous year’s reminisce!• Poem analysis: “We saw” poem is written with the ABCB rhyme scheme but only in oneverse. The repetition of the words “we saw” was meant to give the poem a spoken word vibewhich is why the rhymes are slanted and the meter is inconsistent (Slant Rhymes: rhymes thatdon’t look alike, but sound alike). From an early teen point of view this poem will give you aninsight of what’s ahead in life; from an adult point of view; we can look back and laugh at ourexperiences with “growing”.
  18. 18. Original Poem 3“Writers Block” (Cinquain) by Anfernee Neal• Affliction• Dire, stressful• Blocking, obstructing, tiring• Loss of ALL creativity!!• Writers block
  19. 19. Dedication 3• “Writers Block (Cinquain)” was written May 12th, 2013. I wrote this poembecause of the difficulty to write a poem (at that time). It‟s also something allwriters struggle with at some point of their career (or in leisure). I dedicate thispoem because it tells the reader even the poet faces dire or arduous experiences.• I chose “Writers Block (Cinquain)” for the project, really because it was the onlypoem I had. I tried to find ONE reason for why this poem fits the projects theme;and all I‟ve uncovered is: emotion. Everyone has emotions and “Writers Block(Cinquain)” shows my anger and loathe of writing (tone: the emotion the poetevokes to the reader). However as arduous as writing is, it‟s what I was born todo.• Poem analysis: “Writers Block (Cinquain)” is a 5 line poem, single verse. Thecinquain has no rhyme scheme or meter, but it can if you choose to follow one ofits many fixed forms. My cinquain uses the easiest form: line 1: one word(subject), line 2: two adjectives (words to describe the subject), line 3: threeaction words (verbs), line 4: a phrase, or four words that‟s sums everythingup, and line 5: a related word to line 1.
  20. 20. Original Poem 4“Is This Love” by Anfernee Neal• Is this love• why do I feel deceit• my hearts at war while• you’re at peace• Through your eyes,• is how things should be• if this is love,• this shouldn’t be• Is this love,• shouldn’t I feel bliss• shouldn’t I feel• joy and happiness• if this is love• why are my “I”s not “we”• if this was love, in past tense-• this line wouldn’t be
  21. 21. Dedication 4• “Is this love” was written February 14th, 2012 (Valentine‟s Day). It‟salso my second poem ever written. I wanted to dedicate this poem toshow how I‟ve grown in some aspects of writing such as wordplay,consonance, rhyme/ rhyme scheme, and message. I also wanted to showa fictional side, something from my experiences and from witnessingothers experiences. Basically I just throw myself into another‟s mirrorand reflect the best image of that person‟s situation on paper telling thebest story I could.• “Is this love” fits the projects scheme because what‟s life without someemotion(s)? The speaker of “Is this love” tells the story of being in love.The conflict occurs when the speaker is deceived by the person theylove.• Poem analysis: Constructed of 3 verses; 2 quatrains and one octave(Octave: 8 line poem). The rhyme scheme goes as followed: ABCB (andrepeats for the octave). Again, we see the common repetition of the word“love”; this is to boost obscurity changing from real love, to false love.The most difficult line is the last. “If this was love in past tense this linewouldn‟t be” concludes saying the relationship between the two is over.
  22. 22. Original Poem 5“Graduation” by Anfernee Neal• A final ceremony, we-• Gather honored, our departure-• From the nest, we are pigeons• Fluttering his wings to fly• Spoken is the traditional-• Speech where smiles, tears, recollections-• Take place. Cheers to the pigeons• Fluttering his wings to fly• Music plays and cameras flash• Tassels turn, and caps enhance• The audience applauds the• Fluttering pigeon’s ascension
  23. 23. Dedication 5• “Graduation” was written May 9th, 2013. This poem is my most metaphoricalpoem to date because of the figurative language used to connect the verses. Idedicated this poem because it speaks on graduating, of course, but theprogression it takes to make it to graduation. I feel the concept is relatable to “Wesaw”, as I (the poet) mention growing throughout the school process and how 12years, and 3 divisions leads up to one thrilling, long awaited ceremony.• “Graduation” uses a conceit (Conceit: an extended metaphor in poetry/ verse). Inline 3 we see the image of a bird used to flow through the stream of the poem.Graduation also uses symbolism, the nest being the first home of the birdrepresents elementary and middle school. There‟s imagery through stanzas 2 and3 placing in the mind of the reader a graduation scene.• Poem analysis: Graduation is formed of 3 quatrains. The fourth line of eachquatrain uses the “Fluttering his wings to fly” repetition. The first stanza is ouridea which follows into the preceding verses while the others are images andscenes of graduation to s[ark your memory or give you a prophecy of the future.
  24. 24. Classic Poem 6“Mother to Son” by Langston HughesWell, son, I’ll tell you:Life for me ain’t been no crystal stair.It’s had tacks in it,And splinters,And boards torn up,And places with no carpet on the floor—Bare.But all the timeI’se been a-climbin’on,And reachin’ landin’s,And turnin’corners,And sometimes goin’ in the darkWhere there ain’t been no light.So boy, don’t you turn back.Don’t you set down on the steps’Cause you finds it’s kinder hard.Don’t you fall now—For I’se still goin’, honey,I’se still climbin’,And life for me ain’t been no crystal stair.
  25. 25. Classic Poem 7“Dreams” by Langston Hughes• Hold fast to dreams• For if dreams die• Life is a broken-winged bird• That cannot fly.• Hold fast to dreams• For when dreams go• Life is a barren field• Frozen with snow.
  26. 26. Survey Link: Give your feedback!(Due May 29th, 2013 at 11:59 PM)• https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/viewform?formkey=dGZIVi1MU3U5UXVleUhYNGZ1dWJ3S1E6MQ
  27. 27. Bibliography (poems)• Brooks, Gwendolyn. “We Real Cool” –Poets.org, http://www.poets.org/viewmedia.php/prmMID/15433, Academy of American Poets, n.d. 21May, 2013• Dickinson, Emily. “Hope is the thing with feathers.” –Poets.org, http://www.poets.org/viewmedia.php/prmMID/19729, Academy of American Poets, n.d. 21 May, 2013• Frost, Robert. "The Road Not Taken." - Poets.org. http://www.poets.org/viewmedia.php/prmMID/15717, Academy of American Poets, n.d. 20 May, 2013• Frost, Robert. “Nothing Gold Can Stay.” – Poets.org.http://www.poets.org/viewmedia.php/prmMID/19977, Academy of American Poets, n.d. 20 May ,2013• Hughes, Langston. ―Dreams.‖ – Poets.org. http://www.poets.org/viewmedia.php/prmMID/16075, Academy ofAmerican Poets, n.d. 25 May 2013• Hughes, Langston. “Mother to Son.” – Poetryfoundation.org.http://www.poetryfoundation.org/poem/177021#poem, 1994, n.d. 25 May 2013• Merwin, W. S. ―Thanks‖ – Poets.org, http://www.poets.org/viewmedia.php/prmMID/20492 Academy ofAmerican Poets, n.d. 21, May 2013
  28. 28. Bibliography (Photos)• BrokenWing. Photograph: http://joon.be/old/blog2010/index.php?show=27.By Joon.be. N.d. Web. 25 May 2013• Courage the Cowardly Dog. Photograph: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0220880/.By IMDB. 1999. Web 24 May 2013• CrystalStair. Photograph: http://www.unleashingyou.org/blogs/jenn/?p=50.By unknown. N.d. Web. 25 May 2013• Gale. Photograph :http://lvcounseling.com/2011/12/30/hope-is-the-thing-with-feathers/. By Lisa Van Der Merwe. 30 Dec. 2011. Web. 24 May 2013• Storm. Photograph :http://viewallpapers.com/fantasy-storm-shark.html. ByViewWallpapers.com. 5 May 2013. Web. 24 May 2013• TcIce. Photograph:http://fredericksburg.com/News/FLS/2007/022007/02242007/261239. By REZAMARVASHTI/THE FREE LANCE-STAR. 24 Feb. 2007. Web. 25 May 2013
  29. 29. Bibliography (Photos) II• Thank You. Photograph :http://panoramapdg.com/when-thank-you-is-more-than-two-words/. By Stewart, Aaron. 29 Apr. 2013. Web. 24 May 2013• The-road-not-taken. 2013. Photograph :http://shop.glisteninglight.com/post/buy-now-the-road-not-taken-photo-prints-gifts. By Brown, Patrick. N.d. Web. 24 May 2013.• Tree-of-knowledge-of-good-and-evil. Photograph :Tree of Knowledge.http://www.footwa.com/tree-of-knowledge-of-good-and-evil/2139/. ByJain, Anurag. 21 Aug. 2011. Web. 24 May 2013• We Real Cool. Photograph :http://www.flickr.com/photos/juliaweegar/2782661606/.By Weegar, Julia. 20 Aug. 2008. Web. 24 May 2013• Yellow Wood. 2011. Photograph. : http://foxthepoet.blogspot.com/2010/11/two-roads-diverged-in-yellow-wood-and.html. The Road Not Taken. By AramintasCouto. 30 Oct. 2011. Web. 24 May 2013.

×