Mediu n desene animate

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Mediu n desene animate

  1. 1. Brenda Hoddinott N-01 INTERMEDIATE: 3-D CARTOONS This project takes you step-by-step through the process of drawing an adorable cartoon of a young child with curly hair. You use hatching and crosshatching graduations to shade the facial forms, and squirkles to create the texture of curly hair.There’s a method to my madness in having you occasionally draw cartoons instead of realisticportraits. Cartoon drawings don’t have a lot of intricate details, thereby allowing you to focusyour full attention on the skills being introduced.The lesson is divided into the following two sections: SETTING UP YOUR DRAWING: In this section, you set up your drawing format and outline Misha’s head and face. A simple grid helps you draw a symmetrical face and accurate facial proportions. You need HB, 2B, 4B, and 6B pencils, a ruler, vinyl and kneaded erasers, and good quality drawing paper. ADDING SHADING TO MISHA’S FACE: With this adorable little face completely outlined, you then add shading with hatching, crosshatching, and squirkle graduations. Light from the right affects the placement and value of every section of shading.Suggested drawing supplies include good quality white drawing paper, HB, 2B, 4B, and 6Bpencils, a ruler, and kneaded and vinyl erasers. This lesson is recommended for home schooling, academic and recreational fine art educators, as well as artists of all ages with basic drawing skills that include hatching, crosshatching, and squirkling. 9 PAGES - 11 ILLUSTRATIONS Published by Hoddinott Fine Art Publishers, Halifax, NS, Canada – 2004 (Revised 2006)
  2. 2. 2 SETTING UP YOUR DRAWING In this section, you set up your drawing format and outline Misha’s head and face. A simple grid helps you draw a symmetrical face and accurate facial proportions. You need HB, 2B, 4B, and 6B pencils, a ruler, vinyl and kneaded erasers, and good quality drawing paper. ILLUSTRATION 01-01 1) Draw a square as your drawing space. Suggested sizes include 4 by 4, 6 by 6, or 8 by 8 inches. 2) Measure the halfway point on each of the four sides of the square and mark them with dots. 3) Divide your drawing space into four equal sections by connecting the opposite dots. Draw these lines VERY lightly because you have to erase them later! ILLUSTRATION 01-02 4) Draw a U-shape (Misha’s face) in the lower half of your drawing format. Use the grid lines to visually measure spaces so both sides of the face are symmetrical, rather than lopsided. Draw slowly. Check both sides of the face often to make sure they are both the same shape and width.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott andmay not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web site http://www.finearteducation.com or http://www.drawspace.com
  3. 3. 3 ILLUSTRATION 01-03 5) Draw the ears on either side of the head. ILLUSTRATION 01-04 6) Outline two almond shaped eyes on the face and add slightly curved lines (eyebrows) above the eyes.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott andmay not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web site http://www.finearteducation.com or http://www.drawspace.com
  4. 4. 4 ILLUSTRATION 01-05 7) Draw an oval shape (the nose) below the eyes. ILLUSTRATION 01-06 8) Lightly sketch the outline of the top half of the head. 9) Use your 6B pencil to shade the eyes, leaving the highlights white. The light source is from the right.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott andmay not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web site http://www.finearteducation.com or http://www.drawspace.com
  5. 5. 5 ILLUSTRATION 01-07 10) Draw a curved line below the nose (the mouth) and add a tiny curved line on each end of the mouth. Rotate your paper and view the face from different perspectives as you draw. This little trick often allows you insight into any problem areas. 11) Draw another curved line above the bottom of the face to represent a chubby chin. ILLUSTRATION 01-08 12) Erase your grid lines. 13) Draw wiggly lines around the upper section of the face to separate it from the hair. For lots of information on various shading techniques, refer to the lessons on squirkling and hatching in D-level: Beginner, F-level: Beginner, and L-level: Intermediate.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott andmay not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web site http://www.finearteducation.com or http://www.drawspace.com
  6. 6. 6 ADDING SHADING TO MISHA’S FACE This adorable little face is completely outlined and it’s time to add some shading! Light from the right affects the placement and value of every section of shading. 14) With 2H and HB pencils, lightly shade the entire face with hatching graduations. The shading is lighter on the right, closer to the light source. ILLUSTRATION 01-09Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott andmay not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web site http://www.finearteducation.com or http://www.drawspace.com
  7. 7. 7 15) Use crosshatching graduations to add smoother values to the face and nose. Use HB and 2B pencils. By drawing a second set of hatching lines, crossing over the first, you create crosshatching. With the addition of crosshatching lines, the overall shading becomes a little darker, which makes Misha’s face look three-dimensional. You can easily fix areas of shading you don’t like. Pat a too-dark section of shading with a kneaded eraser to make it lighter. Add more shading lines to make a section darker. ILLUSTRATION 01-10Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott andmay not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web site http://www.finearteducation.com or http://www.drawspace.com
  8. 8. 8 16) Shade the hair with graduated squirkles. Use a 4B pencil for darker values (on the left) and HB for lighter sections. Lots of little curls extend around the edges of the head and onto the ears and forehead. A graduation of squirkles creates the texture of curly hair and makes the hair look three-dimensional. ILLUSTRATION 01-11 Sign your name, add today’s date on the back of your drawing, and then pat yourself on the back!Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott andmay not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web site http://www.finearteducation.com or http://www.drawspace.com
  9. 9. 9 BRENDA HODDINOTT - BIOGRAPHY As a self-educated teacher, visual artist, portraitist, forensic artist, and illustrator, Brenda Hoddinott utilizes diverse art media including graphite, technical pen, colored pencil, chalk pastel, charcoal, conté crayon, and oil paints. My philosophy on teaching art is to focus primarily on the enjoyment aspects while gently introducing the technical and academic. Hence, in creating a passion for the subject matter, the quest for knowledge also becomes enjoyable. >Brenda Hoddinott< Born in St. John’s, Newfoundland, Brenda grew up in the small town of Corner Brook. She developed strong technical competencies with a personal commitment to self directed learning, and the aid of assorted “Learn to Draw” books. During Brenda’s twenty-five year career as a self-educated civilian forensic artist, numerous criminal investigation departments have employed Brenda’s skills, including Royal Canadian Mounted Police and municipal police departments. In 1992, Brenda was honored with a commendation from the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, and in 1994, she was awarded a Certificate of Membership from “Forensic Artists International”. Her home-based art career included graphic design, and teaching recreational drawing and painting classes. As supervisor of her community’s recreational art department, Brenda hired and trained teachers, and designed curriculum for several children’s art programs. In 1998, Brenda chose to end her eighteen-year career as an art educator in order to devote more time to writing, drawing, painting, and developing her websites. Drawspace http://www.drawspace.com incorporates her unique style and innovative approach to curriculum development. This site offers downloadable and printable drawing classes for students of all abilities from the age of eight through adult. Students of all ages, levels and abilities have praised the simple step-by-step instructional approach. This site is respected as a resource for fine art educators, home schooling programs, and educational facilities throughout the world. LEARN-TO-DRAW BOOKS BY BRENDA HODDINOTT Drawing for Dummies (2003): Wiley Publishing, Inc., New, York, NY, this 336 page book is available on various websites and in major bookstores internationally. The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Drawing People (2004): Winner of the Alpha-Penguin Book of the Year Award 2004, Alpha - Pearson Education – Macmillan, Indianapolis, IN, this 360 page book is available on various websites and in major bookstores internationally.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott andmay not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web site http://www.finearteducation.com or http://www.drawspace.com
  10. 10. Brenda Hoddinott N-02 INTERMEDIATE: 3-D CARTOONS In this fun lesson, you use graduated hatchingtechniques to define the three dimensional forms of an adorable penguin named Tux. You first establish the proportions of his head, body, feet and wings; thenoutline the various shapes and forms; and finally using graduated hatching lines to characterize the feathers.While Tux’s markings don’t definitively place him into any one specific penguin variety, he isnonetheless easily identified as a penguin.This project is divided into the following two sections: PUTTING PROPORTIONS ON PAPER: You begin by setting up your drawing format and sketching the proportions of the penguin with help from a simple grid. You then draw a neat outline in preparation for shading. ADDING SHADING AND TEXTURE: You work with only three graduations – light, medium, and dark – to shade the three dimensional forms of the entire penguin. Finally you draw the details of Tux’s tuxedo, eyes, wings, tail, feet, and beak.Suggested drawing supplies include good quality white drawing paper, a ruler, kneaded andvinyl erasers, and various graphite pencils, such as 2H, 2B, HB, 4B, and 6B. This project is recommended for artists, aged ten to ninety-nine, who have some basic drawing skills, and also for home schooling, academic and recreational fine art educators. 22 PAGES - 28 ILLUSTRATIONS Published by Hoddinott Fine Art Publishers, Halifax, NS, Canada
  11. 11. 2 PUTTING PROPORTIONS ON PAPER Penguins share many characteristics with other birds, such as being warm-blooded, having feathers, a beak, two legs, and laying eggs. They are incredibly adorable and easily identified by dark overcoats of feathers which look like long-tailed tuxedo jackets. Even though penguins can’t fly and look clumsy when walking on land, they are very strong swimmers. Penguins use their wings as flippers to smoothly propel themselves quickly through the cold waters of their homes in search of food. Their unique markings identify at least eighteen different types of penguins who range in height from less than fourteen inches to more than four feet. In other words, penguins come in lots of shapes and sizes, and with various markings. Hence, in this project, you have the creative license to draw a penguin that looks very different than Tux. Setting up accurate proportions is the foundation of drawing. If the proportions of your subject are off, no amount of beautiful shading or fancy pencil marks can save your drawing. You begin by setting up your drawing format and sketching the proportions of the penguin with help from a simple grid. You then draw a neat outline in preparation for shading. The size of your drawing format determines the height of your penguin. Consider the following sizes of rectangular formats for the different shapes of penguins: Short: 4 by 5 inches, or 6 by 7.5 inches, or 8 by 10 inches Medium: 4 by 6 inches, or 6 by 9 inches, or 10 by 12 inches Tall: 4 by 7 inches, or 6 by 10.5 inches, or 8 by 14 inches ILLUSTRATION 02-03 ILLUSTRATION 02-02 ILLUSTRATION 02-01Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott andmay not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites: http://www.drawspace.com http://www.finearteducation.com
  12. 12. 3 ILLUSTRATION 02-04 1) Set up a vertical rectangular (often referred to as “portrait”) drawing space and divide it into six equal squares (or rectangles, depending on your choice of drawing format). My drawing format is 4 by 6 inches with 2 inch squares. 2) Lightly sketch a oval-shape for the penguin’s body, very slightly toward the left of your drawing space. Don’t press too hard with your pencil. You will need to erase these lines later. Make sure you leave room to add the penguin’s head, tail, and feet. Don’t press too hard with your pencils! No matter how careful you are, when you draw with a grid, accidents do happen. If you draw some lines in the wrong grid squares, simply erase that section, redraw the grid lines, and keep on going! Lightly drawn lines are easy to erase!Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott andmay not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites: http://www.drawspace.com http://www.finearteducation.com
  13. 13. 4 ILLUSTRATION 02-05 3) Draw an upside-down U-shape as his head on the top of the body. When drawing with a grid you may find it easier to draw only the contents of one square at a time. ILLUSTRATION 02-06 4) Add a rounded shape in the lower right to mark the location of his tail feathers.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott andmay not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites: http://www.drawspace.com http://www.finearteducation.com
  14. 14. 5 ILLUSTRATION 02-07 5) Sketch the placement of the feet. Observe that the foot on the right appears to be much larger than the other. In real life when viewing a penguin from the front, both feet would be the same size. In that this foot is closer to the viewer, perspective dictates that it needs to be drawn bigger than the one farther away. 6) Refine the shape of the head by making it smaller, rounder on the upper right, and less round on the left, bottom and lower right. Focus on only the upper two squares (or rectangles). Keep in mind that the penguin’s face will be turned slightly toward the left. ILLUSTRATION 02-08 Double check the proportions of each section of your sketch as you go, by visually measuring the shapes of the positive and negative spaces.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott andmay not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites: http://www.drawspace.com http://www.finearteducation.com
  15. 15. 6 ILLUSTRATION 02-09 7) Sketch a curved line on the left to indicate the upper chest (you may prefer to call it the breast). 8) Add a curved line on the right to mark the other side of his body and the back of his neck. 9) Sketch the outline of his bill (or beak). Penguins’ bills come in various shapes and sizes depending on the type of penguin. Feel free to make the beak larger, smaller, thicker or thinner. ILLUSTRATION 02-10 10) Erase the tiny section of the outline of his head that was inside the perimeter of the beak. 11) Indicate the opening of his beak with another slightly curved line. ILLUSTRATION 02-11 12) Add two circular shapes to mark the placement of his eyes.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott andmay not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites: http://www.drawspace.com http://www.finearteducation.com
  16. 16. 7 ILLUSTRATION 02-12 13) Add a curved line on the side of his head to mark the location of a section of lighter feathers. ILLUSTRATION 02-13 14) Give the penguin a smaller belly by modifying the lower section of the outline of his tummy (on the left). Note that the chest stays the same size so as to give him a proud posture and a more sophisticated appearance.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott andmay not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites: http://www.drawspace.com http://www.finearteducation.com
  17. 17. 8 ILLUSTRATION 02-14 15) Sketch the outline of the lower section of his body. 16) Redraw the feet so the bottoms are flat rather than rounded. ILLUSTRATION 02-15 17) Outline the circular shape of the upper section of his chest. 18) Add the outlines of the shoulder and the upper section of the wing.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott andmay not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites: http://www.drawspace.com http://www.finearteducation.com
  18. 18. 9 ILLUSTRATION 02-16 19) Redraw the tail section slightly smaller than the original sketch. 20) Draw the outlines of both wings (you may wish to call them flippers). 21) Erase the grid lines and check your drawing carefully. 22) Make any changes to the proportions until you are totally happy with your drawing. Throughout all stages of drawing, constantly double check the proportions of your sketch. Pay close attention to the lengths, angles, and curves of the various lines which outline the different parts of his head, body, wings, and feet. The directions, in which the lines curve, help create the illusion of form.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott andmay not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites: http://www.drawspace.com http://www.finearteducation.com
  19. 19. 10 ILLUSTRATION 02-17 23) Erase all your grid lines. ILLUSTRATION 02-18 24) Lighten all your rough sketch lines with your kneaded eraser until you can barely see them. 25) With a nice sharp pencil slowly and carefully redraw the entire penguin. Sketch an additional line around each eye. Take note of the double lines on the fronts of the wings which indicates their thickness. Draw the feathers of the tail and upper legs. Add the outlines of his feet and toes.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott andmay not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites: http://www.drawspace.com http://www.finearteducation.com
  20. 20. 11 ADDING SHADING AND TEXTURE You work with only three graduations – light, medium, and dark – to shade the three dimensional forms of the entire penguin. Finally you draw the details of Tux’s tuxedo, eyes, wings, tail, feet, and beak. Dig out your 2H, HB, 2B, and 4B pencils. 26) Before you begin shading Tex, practice your hatching skills by drawing three different raggedy-textured graduations of light, medium, and dark values. Remember, different values are created by: varying the density of the lines you draw; varying the pressure used in holding your pencils; and using different grades of pencils from 2H to 6B. The hatching lines used to draw Tex’s feathers are ragged and uneven with lines of various lengths and thicknesses. While some hatching lines are dark and others are light, you still need to maintain an overall difference of values from light to dark. Use a 2H pencil to make a vertical light gradation that is white at the top and becomes darker at the bottom. Draw a medium graduation that begins light (HB) at the top and becomes darker at the bottom. Graduate the texture of dark feathers by using a 2B at the top and ending with very dark values done with a 4B. ILLUSTRATION 02-19 LIGHT: 2H PENCIL MEDIUM: HB PENCIL DARK: 2B AND 4B PENCILS Remember, light affects the placement and value of every section of shading. Keep in mind that a full range of values gives contrast between the light and the shadow areas. The light source is from the upper left in this drawing, so the shading will be a little darker on the lower right.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott andmay not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites: http://www.drawspace.com http://www.finearteducation.com
  21. 21. 12 Before you begin shading, closely examine his head and take note of the directions in which all the hatching lines curve. ILLUSTRATION 02-21 27) Add dark textured shading to his face and the top of his head. 28) Use medium textured shading graduations to draw the feathers on his cheek. 29) Add smooth medium shading to the beak (bill). ILLUSTRATION 02-22 30) Add dark shading in the shadow areas of the bill with a 2B. 31) Fill in the pupil of the eye with a 6B pencil. 32) Use medium shading to complete the irises and the circular rims around each eye.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott andmay not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites: http://www.drawspace.com http://www.finearteducation.com
  22. 22. 13 ILLUSTRATION 02-23 33) Beginning under the chin, add shading to the penguin’s chest and tummy. Use light graduations of textured shading and watch very closely the directions in which the feathers grow. Note that all the shading lines used everywhere on the penguin’s chest and tummy are curved rather than straight. Switch to an HB pencil as your shading lines get close to the wing on the right, and for the sections that are in shadow close to the bottom of his body.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott andmay not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites: http://www.drawspace.com http://www.finearteducation.com
  23. 23. 14 34) Using dark textured graduations, add shading to the section of Tux’s “tux” on the left. Note that the darkest section is close to his body under the upper section of his wing. 35) Add medium graduated values to the light sections of his wing on the right. ILLUSTRATION 02-24 Watch very closely the different directions in which the hatching lines curve. Take your time. The directions, in which the hatching lines curve, are important, because they help give the illusion of depth to the various forms. ILLUSTRATION 02-25Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott andmay not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites: http://www.drawspace.com http://www.finearteducation.com
  24. 24. 15 36) Add the lightest areas of dark shading to the legs, feet, and tail, and add a cast shadow under the body of the penguin with medium graduations. ILLUSTRATION 02-26Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott andmay not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites: http://www.drawspace.com http://www.finearteducation.com
  25. 25. 16 37) Add dark shading to his feet, legs, tail and toes. 38) Add talons to the ends of his toes. 39) Use a combination of hatching and crosshatching to add darker sections to the cast shadow on the surface below Tux. ILLUSTRATION 02-27 Add final touches if needed. Refer to the completed drawing on the next page. Sign your name and put today’s date on the back of your drawing! You have just completed a major project! If you enjoyed drawing Tux, try you hand at drawing an adorable giraffe named Dandy, or a Dalmatian named Shadow. These two projects, along with others (including an adorable young owl, named Hooter) are available in the advanced section of Drawspace.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott andmay not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites: http://www.drawspace.com http://www.finearteducation.com
  26. 26. 17Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott andmay not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites: http://www.drawspace.com http://www.finearteducation.com
  27. 27. 18 BRENDA HODDINOTT - BIOGRAPHY As a self-educated teacher, visual artist, portraitist, forensic artist, and illustrator, Brenda Hoddinott utilizes diverse art media including graphite, technical pen, colored pencil, chalk pastel, charcoal, conté crayon, and oil paints. My philosophy on teaching art is to focus primarily on the enjoyment aspects while gently introducing the technical and academic. Hence, in creating a passion for the subject matter, the quest for knowledge also becomes enjoyable. >Brenda Hoddinott< Born in St. John’s, Newfoundland, Brenda grew up in the small town of Corner Brook. She developed strong technical competencies with a personal commitment to self directed learning, and the aid of assorted “Learn to Draw” books. During Brenda’s twenty-five year career as a self-educated civilian forensic artist, numerous criminal investigation departments have employed Brenda’s skills, including Royal Canadian Mounted Police and municipal police departments. In 1992, Brenda was honored with a commendation from the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, and in 1994, she was awarded a Certificate of Membership from “Forensic Artists International”. Her home-based art career included graphic design, and teaching recreational drawing and painting classes. As supervisor of her community’s recreational art department, Brenda hired and trained teachers, and designed curriculum for several children’s art programs. In 1998, Brenda chose to end her eighteen-year career as an art educator in order to devote more time to writing, drawing, painting, and developing her websites. Fine Art Education http://www.finearteducation.com incorporates her unique style and innovative approach to curriculum development. This site offers downloadable and printable drawing classes for students of all abilities from the age of eight through adult. Students of all ages, levels and abilities have praised the simple step-by-step instructional approach. This site is respected as a resource for fine art educators, home schooling programs, and educational facilities throughout the world. ART PUBLICATIONS BY BRENDA HODDINOTT Drawing for Dummies: Wiley Publishing, Inc., New, York, NY, this 336 page book is available on various websites and in major bookstores internationally. The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Drawing People: Winner of the Alpha-Penguin Book of the Year Award 2004, Alpha - Pearson Education – Macmillan, Indianapolis, IN, this 360 page book is available on various websites and in major bookstores internationally.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott andmay not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites: http://www.drawspace.com http://www.finearteducation.com
  28. 28. Brenda HoddinottN-03 INTERMEDIATE: 3-D CARTOONSIn this project, you draw a fun cartoon of a three-eyed alien, by using hatching and crosshatchingto shade realistic eyes, and the three dimensional forms of a cylinder and two spheres.Skills presented include: drawing with curved and straight lines, identifying and shading lightand shadow areas on forms, and shading graduated values with hatching and crosshatching.This lesson is divided into the following two sections: Outlining Silly’s Shapes: You use both straight and curved lines to outline the proportions of the various shapes that make up Silly Cylinder. Turning Shapes into Forms with Shading: You use hatching and crosshatching graduations to transform Silly’s shapes into forms. The light source is from the upper left; hence the shading is darker on the right.Suggested drawing supplies include 2H, HB, 4B and 6B Pencils, vinyl and kneaded erasers, andgood quality drawing paper. This lesson is recommended for artists with basic drawing skills, as well as home schooling, academic and recreational fine art educators of advanced students. 8 PAGES – 16 ILLUSTRATIONS Published by Hoddinott Fine Art Publishers, Halifax, NS, Canada 2002 (Revised 2006)
  29. 29. 2Outlining Silly’s ShapesIn this section, you use both straight and curved lines to outline the proportions of the variousshapes that make up Silly Cylinder. Curved lines are created when a straight line curves (orbends). Proportion is the relationship in size of one component of a drawing to another or others.The word shape refers to the outward outline of a form.1. Draw two straight horizontal lines parallel to the top and bottom of your drawing space. Leave plenty of room above the upper line to later add his antennas. A drawing space (sometimes called a drawing format) refers to the area within a specific perimeter, such as a page in your sketchbook, or an outline of a shape of any size, such as a square, rectangle or circle.2. Draw curved lines connecting the ends of your horizontal lines on either side. Examine the areas where these curved lines meet the straight lines. These “rounded corners” are curved rather than forming a sharp point.3. Draw another curved line on the inside of the right side of your shape forming a vertical oval (called an ellipse). This curved line is almost identical (slightly straighter) to the curve on the left side of your shape. An ellipse is a circle viewed from an angular perspective. It appears to be an oval with both ends being identical in size and shape. This particular ellipse looks like a circle that has been stretched upward and downward. Now you have a cylinder. Turn your paper around and peek at your cylinder from various angles and adjust any sections you aren’t happy with.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  30. 30. 34. Draw three circular shapes on the front side of the cylinder to represent the outlines of the whites of the eyes. The white of the eye (sometimes called the eyeball) is the large spherical section that is light in value.5. Add two antennas at the top of “Silly Cylinder”. Note the way these lines curve and that one end of each antenna begins inside the cylinder shape.6. Draw a circle on each end of the two antennas.7. Add three circles inside the whites as irises. The iris of an eye is the colored circular shape surrounding the pupil. The pupil of an eye is the dark circle inside the iris, which adjusts its size to different lighting conditions. Each of the irises is located in a different place on the whites. The first is “looking” to the left. The second is looking down and the third is looking up. This is part of what gives this cartoon its silly facial expression. You may choose to draw the circles freehand, but it’s perfectly ok to use a compass or some other tool.8. Outline pupils inside the irises and fill then in very darkly with your 6B pencil. Notice the little spot that is missing in the upper left (the shape of a backwards “C”). It almost looks as if someone took a bite out of the circle. The inside of the C-shaped section (the highlight) will remain white. The highlight of an eye is a bright spot that defines where light bounces off its surface.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  31. 31. 4 9. Outline the top half of the highlights inside each of the three eyes. The top half of the outline of each highlight completes a tiny circle.Turning Shapes intoForms with ShadingIn this section you use hatching and crosshatching graduations to transform Silly’s shapes intoforms. Hatching is a series of lines (called a set) drawn closely together to give the illusion ofvalues. Crosshatching is a technique for rendering an infinite range of values within shading, inwhich one set of lines crosses over (overlaps) another set. A graduation (also called graduatedshading) is a continuous progression of graduated values from dark to light or from light to dark.Form, as applied to drawing, is the illusion of the three-dimensional structure of a shape, such asa circle, square or triangle, created in a drawing with shading and/or perspective.The light source is from the upper left; hence the shading is darker on the right. Light sourcerefers to the direction from which a dominant light originates.The placement of a light source tells youwhere to draw all the light values andshadows. For example, the highlights are inthe upper left of the eyes.10. With your 2H pencil, draw very faint outlines of the highlights in each of the balls on the end of the antennas. By marking these areas, you’ll remember to leave them white when you add shading to these circles to transform them into spheres.11. Draw a long wiggly line with a tiny curved line on each end to represent the mouth.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  32. 32. 512. Use your HB pencil and crosshatching to add light and middle values to the end of the cylinder. Values are the different shades of gray created when you draw by varying both the density of the shading lines, and the pressure used in holding your pencils. By drawing the light and middle values first, you can then layer your dark shading on top of your light shading with your 4B pencil. This layering creates a nice smooth transition between the different values.13. Visually locate and then draw the dark shadow areas on the top and left side of the ellipse with your 4B pencil.14. Add the light shading to the upper section of the cylinder with curved hatching lines and your HB pencil. This shading is done with curved hatching lines which follow the curved lines that outline each end of the cylinder. The shading graduates from a medium value at the top to a light value (almost white) and then back to a medium value again closer to the mouth. The shading becomes light again just above the mouth.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  33. 33. 615. Use your HB pencil and curved hatching lines to shade the light values on the lower section of the cylinder.16. With your 4B pencil graduate your medium and dark values from the mouth downward toward the lighter values.17. Add a really dark shadow area under the mouth. Use your 6B pencil. This dark shading creates the illusion that the upper section of the mouth is in front of the lower section.18. Shade in the balls on the end of the alien’s antennas. Note that the highlights are left the white of the paper. The curved hatching lines follow the curves of the circle shape. The shading lines graduate from the highlight towards the lower right of each sphere. The values begin light (close to the highlight) and become dark and then light again close to the lower right edge of the sphere. Let your pencils from light (HB) to dark (4B) do a lot of the work in creating different values.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  34. 34. 719. Add shading to the irises of the alien’s eyes. First of all, use your HB pencil to fill in the entire space inside the big circle (except for the highlight of course). Pull and stretch your kneaded eraser until it becomes soft, and then mold it to a point. Finally, use the point of your kneaded eraser to gently pat the shading on the side of the circle opposite the highlight. Keep doing this until it becomes lighter than the rest of the shading.20. Visually locate and then shade in the dark areas of the irises of the eyes with your 4B pencil. The darkest areas of irises are usually pretty easy to identify because they are often on the same side as the highlight.Use your vinyl eraser toclean up any smudges orfingerprints on yourdrawing paper.Put today’s date onthe page, sign yourname and pat yourselfon the back!ChallengeCreate an alien life form from your imagination with at least one eye. Use circles and cylindersand make sure the shading includes both hatching and crosshatching.Remember, there is no right or wrong way to draw. You, as an artist, can draw forms in oodles ofdifferent ways, such as drawing just the light and shadow areas, or outlining with detailed linesand then adding shading. Take time to experiment with different ways of drawing, until you findthe styles with which you are most comfortable.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  35. 35. 8Brenda HoddinottAs a self-educated teacher, visual artist, portraitist, forensic artist, and illustrator, Brenda utilizesdiverse art media including graphite, technical pen, colored pencil, chalk pastel, charcoal, contécrayon, and oil paints. My philosophy on teaching art is to focus primarily on the enjoyment aspects while gently introducing the technical and academic. Hence, in creating a passion for the subject matter, the quest for knowledge also becomes enjoyable. >Brenda Hoddinott<BIOGRAPHYBorn in St. John’s, Newfoundland, Brenda grew up in the small town of Corner Brook. Shedeveloped strong technical competencies with a personal commitment to self directed learning,and the aid of assorted “Learn to Draw” books. During Brenda’s twenty-five year career as aself-educated civilian forensic artist, numerous criminal investigation departments haveemployed Brenda’s skills, including Royal Canadian Mounted Police and municipal policedepartments. In 1992, Brenda was honored with a commendation from the Royal CanadianMounted Police, and in 1994, she was awarded a Certificate of Membership from “ForensicArtists International”.Her home-based art career included graphic design, and teaching recreational drawing andpainting classes. As supervisor of her community’s recreational art department, Brenda hired andtrained teachers, and designed curriculum for several children’s art programs. In 1998, Brendachose to end her eighteen-year career as an art educator in order to devote more time to writing,drawing, painting, and developing her websites.Drawspace http://www.drawspace.com incorporates her unique style and innovative approach tocurriculum development. This site offers downloadable and printable drawing classes forstudents of all abilities from the age of eight through adult. Students of all ages, levels andabilities have praised the simple step-by-step instructional approach. This site is respected as aresource for fine art educators, home schooling programs, and educational facilities throughoutthe world.LEARN-TO-DRAW BOOKS Drawing for Dummies: Wiley Publishing, Inc., New, York, NY, this 336 page book is available on various websites and in major bookstores internationally. The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Drawing People: Winner of the Alpha-Penguin Book of the Year Award 2004, Alpha - Pearson Education – Macmillan, Indianapolis, IN, this 360 page book is available on various websites and in major bookstores internationally.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  36. 36. Brenda Hoddinott N04 INTERMEDIATE: 3-D CARTOONS In this project, you draw the fascinating face and spiffy hairstyle (or should I say feather-style) of Emma the Emu.Very few people would consider emus to be the most beautiful birds in the world; yet their funnyfaces present them as incredibly appealing and memorable. The neck and head of an adult Emuis mostly bald except for a few shaggy, unruly feathers. Emus are the tallest birds in their nativeAustralia, ranging in height from 5 to 6 feet, with long powerful legs that allow them to run veryquickly. As with other flightless birds such as penguins, emus’ wings are not designed to giveflight to their disproportionately large bodies.This project is divided into two sections: OUTLINING EMMA: You draw a simple line drawing of Emma’s funny face. The first goal is to sketch the shapes of the various parts of Emma proportionately correct. From there you outline her head and beak. SHADING EYE, FEATHERS AND BEAK: You begin adding shading to Emma by completing her gorgeous eye. You then add her scruffy and wild fluffy feathers with hatching lines, and finally add hatching and crosshatching lines to make the forms of her beak look three-dimensional.Suggested drawing supplies include good quality white drawing paper, various graphite pencilsincluding 2H, HB, 2B, 4B, and 6B, kneaded and vinyl erasers, and a pencil sharpener. 10 PAGES – 18 ILLUSTRATIONS This lesson is recommended for artists and aspiring artists, from age 12 to adult with basic drawing skills, including the shading techniques of hatching and crosshatching. The curriculum of this lesson is easily implemented into instructional programs for home schooling, academic and recreational learning environments. Published by Hoddinott Fine Art Publishers, Halifax, NS, Canada - 2007
  37. 37. -2-OUTLINING EMMAYour first goal is to sketch the shapes of the various parts of Emma proportionately correct.From there you outline Emma’s head and beak. Don’t press too hard with your pencils. Not onlydo these areas become impossible to erase or touch up, but they also leave dents in your paper. ILLUSTRATION 4-01 Proportion is the relationship in size of one component of a drawing to another or others. Shape refers to the outward outline of a form. Basic shapes include circles, squares and triangles. 1. Use an HB pencil to draw a circular shape as Emma’s head. Leave space around the circle to later add her feathers, beak, and neck. Drawing a circle freehand isn’t easy. Try rotating your paper and looking at your drawing from ILLUSTRATION 4-02 different perspectives. This little trick often allows you insights into the problem areas. Looking at the reflection of your circle in a mirror will also help you to see areas in need of fixing. 2. Sketch a triangular shape to identify the placement of the beak. As you work, constantly compare your drawing to mine and double check your proportions. Pay close attention to the lengths, angles, and curves of the various lines which outline the different parts of her head, eyes, and beak. ILLUSTRATION 4-03 3. Add a circular shape close to the center of the large circle to mark the placement of Emma’s eye. Use an HB pencil, and keep your lines very light so they can be easily erased. Always place a piece of clean paper under your hand as you draw. Each time you work on a new section, remember to move your paper so it’s always under your hand. This prevents you from smudging your drawing, and protects the paper from the oils in your skin.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  38. 38. -3- ILLUSTRATION 4-04 4. Sketch two slightly curved lines to mark the edges of Emma’s neck. Curved lines are created when a straight line curves (or bends). Curved lines can be drawn thick or thin. 5. Use your kneaded eraser to lighten your sketch until the lines are very faint. 6. Outline the upper and lower beak with a freshly sharpened HB pencil. Take note that this new outline does not follow the original lines of the rough sketch. Actually, very few initial sketch lines end up as part of the final outline; hence, you need to examine each illustration very closely before you draw.The parts of a bird’s eye are similar to those of many ILLUSTRATION 4-05animals including humans. Take a moment to review thenames of the parts of an eye.1. Highlight: is a bright area that makes an eye look shiny.2. Pupil: is the dark circular shape within the iris.3. Iris: is the circular section surrounding the pupil.4. White of the eye: is the visible section of the eyeball.5. Eyelid: (also called rim) is a fold of skin around the eye. ILLUSTRATION 4-06 7. Add the slightly curved line that separates the top and bottom sections of the beak. 8. Outline the perimeter of Emma’s circular shaped eye. 9. Add the iris of Emma’s eye in the upper left section of the eye. Note that the iris seems to be partially hidden under the outline of the eye. 10. Draw a tiny circle as the highlight of the eye in the upper right of the iris.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  39. 39. -4- ILLUSTRATION 4-0711. Draw a narrow circular shape around the eye. This rim around the eye represents the eyelid. ILLUSTRATION 4-08 12. Outline the pupil of the eye inside the iris. 13. Sketch a teardrop shape close to the pointed end of her beak. ILLUSTRATION 4-0914. Add lines to indicate the directions in which the shaggy feathers will grow. Use the highlight of the eye as the center point; in other words each line will seem to originate from the highlight. ILLUSTRATION 4-10 15. Check over your drawing carefully to make sure you are happy with everything. If you don’t like something, simply erase it and redraw that section.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  40. 40. -5-SHADING EYE, FEATHERS, AND BEAKIn this section, you draw Emma’s gorgeous eye and wild fluffy feathers, and add shading withhatching and crosshatching to the forms of her beak. The light source is from the upper right andin front of Emma.Forms are created in drawings by adding shading to transform shapes into three-dimensionalstructures, such as a circle becoming a sphere. Hatching is a series of lines (called a set) drawnclosely together to give the illusion of values. Values are the different shades of gray created in adrawing with shading. Crosshatching is a shading technique in which one set of lines crossesover (overlaps) another set. Light source is the direction from which a dominant light originates. To render different values you need to vary the density of the lines and the pressure used in holding the pencils, and use several grades of pencils from 2H to 6B.16. Use your 6B pencil to fill in the pupil of the eye. ILLUSTRATION 4-1117. Add shading to the iris. The shading is darker close to the top section of the eyelid (use 2B). The lightest shading is below and to the right of the highlight (use HB or 2H).18. Use HB and 2B pencils to add shading to the rim around the eye.19. Add light shading around the edges of the whites with a 2H pencil. ILLUSTRATION 4-12 ILLUSTRATION 4-13 ILLUSTRATION 4-14 If you have very little hatching experience, or if your hatching skills have become a little rusty, try your hand at the exercises and projects in F-LEVEL BEGINNER: HATCHING.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  41. 41. -6-20. Add dark and medium shading to the inside of her nostril.21. Use your HB pencil to add several scruffy looking lines to indicate the feathers on Emma’s head. Draw these lines from the perimeter of the eye outward and from under her beak downward. The more uneven you make these lines the better the feathers will look. In other words, some need to be long and others short; some are straight, and others are slightly curved; and a few are quite thick and more are very thin. ILLUSTRATION 4-15 Even though this is a cartoon drawing of an Emu, the feathers are actually rendered fairly convincingly. In reality, the shaggy grey or brown feathers on the head and neck of emus are scarce and unruly, with lots of the neck and head showing through.22. Add short hatching lines with an HB pencil, from the edges of the eye outward to fill in the shape of Emma’s head behind the wild feathers. Refer to Illustration 4-16. Remember, hatching lines used to draw feathers are ragged and uneven with lines of various values, lengths, and thicknesses.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  42. 42. -7-23. Use an HB pencil to fill in more feathers under her beak.24. Add shading to the neck with short hatching lines and an HB pencil. The shading on the neck is darker at the top, in the shadow section under the beak.25. Use hatching lines and an HB pencil to define the forms of the beak. Keep in mind that the shadow sections are on the side opposite the light source. Hence, in that the light is from the upper right, the shading needs to be darker on the lower left. ILLUSTRATION 4-1626. With a freshly sharpened 2B pencil, add wiggly lines to the ends of several of the longer feathers (Refer to Illustration 4-17).Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  43. 43. -8-27. Add some wiggly lines to the neck with a very sharp 2B to indicate a few short scruffy feathers.28. Outline her eye and the upper sections of her beak with a freshly sharpened 2B pencil.29. Use your 4B pencil and hatching lines to make the sections of the face around her eye and beak darker. ILLUSTRATION 4-1730. Use your HB pencil and crosshatching to add more details and complete the shading of Emma’s beak.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  44. 44. -9-31. Compare your drawing to mine and make any adjustments you wish to your shading. To make a section darker, simply add more lines. You can pat the shading lines with your kneaded eraser to make a section lighter. ILLUSTRATION 4-18CHALLENGEFind a few reference photos and draw a realistic, close-up portrait of an Emu. You’ll bepleasantly surprised by how simple the shading will seem; the techniques taught in this cartoonproject are the same as needed for drawing a realistic portrait of the head and face of an Emu.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  45. 45. - 10 -Brenda HoddinottAs a self-educated teacher, visual artist, portraitist, forensic artist, and illustrator, Brenda utilizesdiverse art media including graphite, technical pen, colored pencil, chalk pastel, charcoal, contécrayon, and oil paints. My philosophy on teaching art is to focus primarily on the enjoyment aspects while gently introducing the technical and academic. Hence, in creating a passion for the subject matter, the quest for knowledge also becomes enjoyable. Brenda HoddinottBiographyBorn in St. John’s, Newfoundland, Brenda grew up in the small town of Corner Brook. Shedeveloped strong technical competencies with a personal commitment to self directed learning,and the aid of assorted “Learn to Draw” books. During Brenda’s twenty-five year career as aself-educated civilian forensic artist, numerous criminal investigation departments haveemployed Brenda’s skills, including Royal Canadian Mounted Police and municipal policedepartments. In 1992, Brenda was honored with a commendation from the Royal CanadianMounted Police, and in 1994, she was awarded a Certificate of Membership from “ForensicArtists International”.Her home-based art career included graphic design, and teaching recreational drawing andpainting classes. As supervisor of her community’s recreational art department, Brenda hired andtrained teachers, and designed curriculum for several children’s art programs. In 1998, Brendachose to end her eighteen-year career as an art educator in order to devote more time to writing,drawing, painting, and developing her websites.Drawspace http://www.drawspace.com incorporates her unique style and innovative approach tocurriculum development. This site offers downloadable and printable drawing classes forstudents of all abilities from the age of eight through adult. Students of all ages, levels andabilities have praised the simple step-by-step instructional approach. This site is respected as aresource for fine art educators, home schooling programs, and educational facilities throughoutthe world.Learn-to-draw booksDrawing for Dummies: Wiley Publishing, Inc., New, York, NY, this 336 page book is availableon various websites and in major bookstores internationally.The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Drawing People: Winner of the Alpha-Penguin Book of the YearAward 2004, Alpha - Pearson Education – Macmillan, Indianapolis, IN, this 360 page book isavailable on various websites and in major bookstores internationally.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com

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