GOLDEN                              ROSEBUD                                    Brenda Hoddinott           Y-01 ADVANCED: C...
-2-                                                INTRODUCTION     The diversity of colored pencils is explored in this n...
-3-     drawn thick or thin.     Drawing: is the application of an art medium to a surface so as to produce an image, whic...
-4-     Draw a rectangular vertical (sometimes called a portrait format) drawing format. Mine is 3 by 4     inches, but yo...
-5-     2.      Pressing a little harder with your yellow pencil, go over your outline.             Refer to Illustration ...
-6-                                                      ILLUSTRATION 1-07     6.      Add another leaf under the rosebud ...
-7-                    PART TWO: COMING OUT OF THE DARK     In this section you add shading to the petals, leaves and stem...
-8-                                                      ILLUSTRATION 1-10     10. Pressing lightly with your yellow penci...
-9-                                                      ILLUSTRATION 1-11     5.      Use your white pencil to add light ...
- 10 -                                                      ILLUSTRATION 1-12     7.      With your yellow pencil, complet...
- 11 -     LESSON Y1-5: SHADING THE STEM AND LEAVES     In this section you add shading to the leaves and stem of your ros...
- 12 -                                                      ILLUSTRATION 1-15     11. Use your yellow pencil to add gradua...
- 13 -                     PART THREE: ADDING FINAL TOUCHES     In this part, you mix colors together to enhance light and...
- 14 -                                                      ILLUSTRATION 1-17     12. Add a little blue and red to the sha...
- 15 -                                                      ILLUSTRATION 1-18     14. Add some red and purple shading to t...
- 16 -                                                      ILLUSTRATION 1-19     16. Use your black pencil to add some ha...
- 17 -     BRENDA HODDINOTT - BIOGRAPHY     As a self-educated teacher, visual artist, portraitist, forensic artist, and i...
Brenda Hoddinott                  Y-02 ADVANCED: CREATING IN COLORIn this fun project, you use colored pencils to draw an ...
2Wobby is “painted” with primary and secondary colored pencils. Because his face looked soINTRODUCTIONsad in my preliminar...
3                                                                                    FIGURE 201        1               2  ...
42)        Sketch the basic outlines of the head, ears, body, and tail very lightly with your                             ...
5                                FIGURE 205                                                             3)          Erase ...
6In this section, you add colors to the fur. Use a sandpaper block or fine sandpaper to keepADDING WOBBY’S FURyour pencil ...
7          Dark shading, in such places as the flaps under the ears and the creases of the          stitching, creates the...
88)        Add the lightest values in sections that are closest to and in direct exposure of          the light source.   ...
9          Begin shading the darkest yellow sections with pencils 16 and 17. Use VERY few dark          shading lines. The...
10           Irises: 5 (dark green), 3 (yellow), 16 (dark brown), and 18 (rust).10) Select the following colors for shadi...
11Compare your drawing of Wobby’s eyes to mine and make sure you’ve forgotten nothing.Touch up any areas you are not happy...
12Graduations are the primary ingredient in realistic shading. Some individual stripes of theSHADING A RAINBOWribbon have ...
13          Keep in mind that the rose is optional. You can draw it as is, leave it out, change the17) Add shading to the ...
1419) Add shading to the                                                                                                  ...
15                                                              As a self-educated teacher, visual artist, portraitist, fo...
DESIGNING A           OF A     GREASE MONKEY               Brenda HoddinottY-O3 ADVANCED: CREATING IN COLORWith so many ta...
2 THINKING WITH PAPER AND A PENCIL About a month before my daughter, Heidi, got married, she called me with a request, “Ca...
3 Compared to a motor, drawing a tire should be a piece of cake! Back to the drawing board! I used tracing paper to redraw...
4 Colored pencils are very difficult to erase, so I need to be sure that my outline is accurate. I’ve added a lot more det...
5    Defining light and shadow is more than simply using light colors for light areas and dark for the    shadows. Hue mus...
6 The fur on his face, arms, and hands is made up of the following four colors along with a few of the shadow colors from ...
Avansati y creatii in culori
Avansati y creatii in culori
Avansati y creatii in culori
Avansati y creatii in culori
Avansati y creatii in culori
Avansati y creatii in culori
Avansati y creatii in culori
Avansati y creatii in culori
Avansati y creatii in culori
Avansati y creatii in culori
Avansati y creatii in culori
Avansati y creatii in culori
Avansati y creatii in culori
Avansati y creatii in culori
Avansati y creatii in culori
Avansati y creatii in culori
Avansati y creatii in culori
Avansati y creatii in culori
Avansati y creatii in culori
Avansati y creatii in culori
Avansati y creatii in culori
Avansati y creatii in culori
Avansati y creatii in culori
Avansati y creatii in culori
Avansati y creatii in culori
Avansati y creatii in culori
Avansati y creatii in culori
Avansati y creatii in culori
Avansati y creatii in culori
Avansati y creatii in culori
Avansati y creatii in culori
Avansati y creatii in culori
Avansati y creatii in culori
Avansati y creatii in culori
Avansati y creatii in culori
Avansati y creatii in culori
Avansati y creatii in culori
Avansati y creatii in culori
Avansati y creatii in culori
Avansati y creatii in culori
Avansati y creatii in culori
Avansati y creatii in culori
Avansati y creatii in culori
Avansati y creatii in culori
Avansati y creatii in culori
Avansati y creatii in culori
Avansati y creatii in culori
Avansati y creatii in culori
Avansati y creatii in culori
Avansati y creatii in culori
Avansati y creatii in culori
Avansati y creatii in culori
Avansati y creatii in culori
Avansati y creatii in culori
Avansati y creatii in culori
Avansati y creatii in culori
Avansati y creatii in culori
Avansati y creatii in culori
Avansati y creatii in culori
Avansati y creatii in culori
Avansati y creatii in culori
Avansati y creatii in culori
Avansati y creatii in culori
Avansati y creatii in culori
Avansati y creatii in culori
Avansati y creatii in culori
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Avansati y creatii in culori

  1. 1. GOLDEN ROSEBUD Brenda Hoddinott Y-01 ADVANCED: CREATING IN COLOR Overlapping and burnishing colors, and rendering believable shadows, contribute to the realistic three- dimensional forms of a golden rosebud.The diversity of colored pencils is explored in this non-traditional approach to drawing arosebud. The dark gray drawing surface challenges artists to pull the forms of the drawingsubject from darkness into light. CONTENTSIntroduction………………………………………………………………………………..3 Suggested drawing supplies…………………………………………………………………3 Skills presented……………………………………………………………………………...4 Glossary of art terms…………………………………………………………………...........4Part One: Drawing the Outline……………………………………………………………5 Lesson Y1-1: Choosing a format and drawing supplies ……………………………………5 Lesson Y1-2: Outlining a rosebud…………………………………………………………..6Part Two: Coming Out of the Dark ……………………………………………………….8 Lesson Y1-3: Laying down some foundation colors…………………………………..........9 Lesson Y1-4: Shading the rosebud ………………………………………………………..10 Lesson Y1-5: Shading the stem and leaves ………………………………………………..13Part Three: Adding Final Touches……………………………………………………….14 Lesson Y1-6: Guidelines for colors in shadows …………………………………………..15 Lesson Y1-7: Shading medium and dark values…………………………………………...15 Lesson Y1-8: Shading the darkest shadows………………………………………………..18 17 PAGES - 19 ILLUSTRATIONS Recommended for artists with good drawing skills from age 12 to adult, as well as home schooling, academic and recreational fine art educators Published by Hoddinott Fine Art Publishers, Halifax, NS, Canada, Revised 2004
  2. 2. -2- INTRODUCTION The diversity of colored pencils is explored in this non-traditional approach to drawing a rosebud. The dark gray drawing surface challenges artists to pull the forms of the drawing subject from darkness into light. This lesson is divided into three parts:  PART ONE: setting up your drawing format and drawing a detailed outline  PART TWO: shading light and medium values on the petals, stem, and leaves  PART THREE: adding realistic shadows by mixing a specific recipe of colors. SUGGESTED DRAWING SUPPLIES 1. Good quality dark drawing paper or mat board 2. White colored pencil 3. Five other colored pencils, as shown in Illustration 1-01. ILLUSTRATION 1-01 YELLOW ORANGE / RED MEDIUM BLUE PURPLE BLACK SKILLS PRESENTED 1. Drawing with detailed curved contour lines 2. Adding shading with graduated values 3. Blending colors with burnishing 4. Understanding the theory of color in shadows GLOSSARY OF ART TERMS Burnishing: is the application of one layer(s) of color (or white) over another, by pressing hard with a pencil, to blend colors together. Burnishing of colored pencils can also be done with a tortillon or a firm plastic eraser. Color wheel: is a method of arranging colors within a circular format to easily reference colors and their components such as primary, secondary, and complementary colors. Complementary colors: are colors which are opposite one another on the color wheel. Contrast: measures the degree of difference between the light and dark values within shading, and creates the illusion of three-dimensions in a drawing. Curved lines: are created when a straight line curves (or bends). Curved lines can beCopyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web site http://www.finearteducation.com or http://www.drawspace.com
  3. 3. -3- drawn thick or thin. Drawing: is the application of an art medium to a surface so as to produce an image, which visually defines an artist’s choice of drawing subjects from his or her own unique perspective. Drawing space (sometimes called a drawing format): refers to the area of a drawing surface within a specific perimeter, outlined by a shape of any size, such as a square, rectangle or circle. Form: is the illusion of the three-dimensional structure of a shape, such as a circle, square or triangle, created in a drawing with shading and/or perspective. Graduated shading (also known as a graduation or graduated values): is a continuous progression of graduated values from dark to light or from light to dark. Hatching: is a series of lines (called a set) drawn closely together to give the illusion of values. Light source: The direction from which a dominant light originates. The placement of this light source affects every aspect of a drawing. The light source tells you where to draw all the light values and shadows. Outline drawings (also called contour or line drawings): are comprised of lines which follow the contours of the various components of a drawing subject and define the outlines of its forms. Primary colors: are the fundamental colors or pigments of red, yellow, and blue. Secondary colors: are the pigments or colors, orange, green, and purple created by combining any two of the primary colors. Red and yellow make orange, yellow and blue make green, and red and blue make purple. Shading: refers to the various values that make drawings look three-dimensional. Shadows: are the areas on an object that receive little or no light. Shape: refers to the outward outline of a form. Basic shapes include circles, squares and triangles. Values: are the different shades of color created when you draw by varying both the density of the shading lines, and the pressure used in holding your pencils. PART ONE: DRAWING THE OUTLINE Throughout this section you place your rosebud within your drawing space and draw a detailed outline in preparation for adding shading. LESSON Y1-1: CHOOSING A FORMAT AND DRAWING SUPPLIES I used a very dark gray drawing paper with a slightly textured surface. You can use any dark colored drawing paper, but keep in mind that the color of your paper will show through the colored pencils in some places.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web site http://www.finearteducation.com or http://www.drawspace.com
  4. 4. -4- Draw a rectangular vertical (sometimes called a portrait format) drawing format. Mine is 3 by 4 inches, but you may choose any size you wish, such as 4.5 by 6 inches, 6 by 8 inches, or 9 by 12 inches. You need only one colored pencil for the first part of this project. Choose a yellow close in color to Illustration 1-02. ILLUSTRATION 1-02 LESSON Y1-2: OUTLINING A ROSEBUD Find a quiet place where you will be uninterrupted for a while, sharpen your yellow pencil and get ready to draw! ILLUSTRATION 1-03 ILLUSTRATION 1-04 1. Very lightly draw a simple outline of a rosebud, as in Illustration 1-03. The rosebud is at an angle within your drawing space, tilted towards the right. Observe the curve of the stem.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web site http://www.finearteducation.com or http://www.drawspace.com
  5. 5. -5- 2. Pressing a little harder with your yellow pencil, go over your outline. Refer to Illustration 1-04 and refine the shape of your rosebud by adding a few more details with curved lines. ILLUSTRATION 1-05 ILLUSTRATION 1-06 3. As in Illustration 1-05, outline more petals in the center cluster. 4. Add a curved line from the center cluster down to the bottom of the rosebud. This curved line is not in the center, but rather closer to the left. 5. Refer to Illustration 1-06 and draw the outline of a thin leaf close to the bottom of your drawing space on the right. Observe how the leaf begins at the base of the rosebud, curves downward, and then curves toward the right and upwards.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web site http://www.finearteducation.com or http://www.drawspace.com
  6. 6. -6- ILLUSTRATION 1-07 6. Add another leaf under the rosebud on the left, as in Illustration 1-07. Observe how the leaf begins at the base of the rosebud and curves upward towards the left. 7. Outline the stem more distinctly. 8. Draw more small petals in the very center of the cluster.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web site http://www.finearteducation.com or http://www.drawspace.com
  7. 7. -7- PART TWO: COMING OUT OF THE DARK In this section you add shading to the petals, leaves and stem of the rosebud. LESSON Y1-3: LAYING DOWN SOME FOUNDATION COLORS Use your yellow and purple pencils to add the basic forms to the rosebud (as in Illustration 1-08). Practice drawing graduated value scales before you begin. ILLUSTRATION 1-08 YELLOW PURPLE ILLUSTRATION 1-09 9. Use your purple pencil to add shading to the shadow sections (the dark values) of each petal as shown in Illustration 1-09. The light source is from the right in this drawing.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web site http://www.finearteducation.com or http://www.drawspace.com
  8. 8. -8- ILLUSTRATION 1-10 10. Pressing lightly with your yellow pencil, completely color in each petal, including the purple sections. This is called overlapping or dry-mixing colors. LESSON Y1-4: SHADING THE ROSEBUD In addition to yellow, you will need a white pencil for adding highlights to the rosebud.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web site http://www.finearteducation.com or http://www.drawspace.com
  9. 9. -9- ILLUSTRATION 1-11 5. Use your white pencil to add light values to the tips and edges of the petals that are not in shadow (as in Illustration 1-11). You may need to press fairly hard on your pencil to get really light values. 6. Add an oval-shaped primary highlight on the largest petal with white.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web site http://www.finearteducation.com or http://www.drawspace.com
  10. 10. - 10 - ILLUSTRATION 1-12 7. With your yellow pencil, completely color in each petal again, including the purple sections, but excluding some of the white sections. Leave the center sections of the highlights white, as in Illustration 1-12.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web site http://www.finearteducation.com or http://www.drawspace.com
  11. 11. - 11 - LESSON Y1-5: SHADING THE STEM AND LEAVES In this section you add shading to the leaves and stem of your rosebud with the two colors shown in Illustration 1-13. ILLUSTRATION 1-13 YELLOW MEDIUM BLUE ILLUSTRATION 1-14 8. Shade in the leaves and stem with blue, as in Illustration 1-14. Observe that the right side of the stem stays the color of the paper for now so yellow can be added later.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web site http://www.finearteducation.com or http://www.drawspace.com
  12. 12. - 12 - ILLUSTRATION 1-15 11. Use your yellow pencil to add graduated shading to the light sections of each leaf and the stem. The light source is from the right in this drawing. Refer to Illustration 1-15 and take note that the lighter shading is on the right of the rosebud, leaves and stem.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web site http://www.finearteducation.com or http://www.drawspace.com
  13. 13. - 13 - PART THREE: ADDING FINAL TOUCHES In this part, you mix colors together to enhance light and shadow areas, and then darken the shadows with your black pencil. LESSON Y1-6: GUIDELINES FOR COLORS IN SHADOWS While many complex formulas exist for drawing (or painting) shadows, I prefer to use a method that is effective and easy to remember. Inherent in all shadows, no matter how dark, are the following three simple components:  BLUE: Blue is a very cool color and is considered the color of darkness. Believable shadows must have blue in their color mixture.  THE COLOR OF THE SUBJECT: The darkest values of the actual colors of the subjects add realism to the colors of their shadows. In a drawing of a red rose this would be a very dark red. A dark yellow would be in the shadow of a yellow banana. In a drawing of a blue ball, dark values of blue would be in the mixture of the color of its shadow.  THE COMPLEMENTARY COLOR OF THE SUBJECT’S ACTUAL COLOR: Pairs of complementary colors are opposite one another on the color wheel, such as red/green, yellow/purple, and blue/orange. As examples, consider the application of the above three components to the shadow colors of a red rose, a banana, and a blue ball: SUBJECT MIX THESE COLORS INTO THE SHADOW RED ROSE BLUE DARK RED GREEN BANANA BLUE DARK YELLOW PURPLE BLUE BALL BLUE DARK BLUE ORANGE LESSON Y1-7: SHADING MEDIUM AND DARK VALUES You need all five colored pencils, as in Illustration 1-16, to complete your drawing of the golden rosebud. ILLUSTRATION 1-16 YELLOW ORANGE / RED MEDIUM BLUE PURPLE BLACKCopyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web site http://www.finearteducation.com or http://www.drawspace.com
  14. 14. - 14 - ILLUSTRATION 1-17 12. Add a little blue and red to the shadow areas of the rosebud. Refer to Illustration 1-17. These colors make the shadow areas cooler, and the darker yellow areas more golden. 13. Pressing fairly hard with your yellow pencil, completely color in all sections of the rosebud except the white areas. This process, called burnishing, smoothly blends your colors. Yellow makes the brighter colors more vibrant.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web site http://www.finearteducation.com or http://www.drawspace.com
  15. 15. - 15 - ILLUSTRATION 1-18 14. Add some red and purple shading to the shadow sections of the leaves and stem as in Illustration 1-18. 15. Burnish the leaves and stem with yellow.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web site http://www.finearteducation.com or http://www.drawspace.com
  16. 16. - 16 - ILLUSTRATION 1-19 16. Use your black pencil to add some hatching lines in the background. My hatching lines are diagonal from the lower left to the upper right. 17. Add a little black to the very darkest shadow areas of the rosebud, leaves, and stem as in Illustration 1-19. Black should be used very sparingly. Remember less is more!Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web site http://www.finearteducation.com or http://www.drawspace.com
  17. 17. - 17 - BRENDA HODDINOTT - BIOGRAPHY As a self-educated teacher, visual artist, portraitist, forensic artist, and illustrator, Brenda Hoddinott utilizes diverse art media including graphite, technical pen, colored pencil, chalk pastel, charcoal, conté crayon, and oil paints. My philosophy on teaching art is to focus primarily on the enjoyment aspects while gently introducing the technical and academic. Hence, in creating a passion for the subject matter, the quest for knowledge also becomes enjoyable. >Brenda Hoddinott< Born in St. John’s, Newfoundland, Brenda grew up in the small town of Corner Brook. She developed strong technical competencies with a personal commitment to self directed learning, and the aid of assorted “Learn to Draw” books. During Brenda’s twenty-five year career as a self-educated civilian forensic artist, numerous criminal investigation departments have employed Brenda’s skills, including Royal Canadian Mounted Police and municipal police departments. In 1992, Brenda was honored with a commendation from the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, and in 1994, she was awarded a Certificate of Membership from “Forensic Artists International”. Her home-based art career included graphic design, and teaching recreational drawing and painting classes. As supervisor of her community’s recreational art department, Brenda hired and trained teachers, and designed curriculum for several children’s art programs. In 1998, Brenda chose to end her eighteen-year career as an art educator in order to devote more time to writing, drawing, painting, and developing her websites. Drawspace http://www.drawspace.com incorporates her unique style and innovative approach to curriculum development. This site offers downloadable and printable drawing classes for students of all abilities from the age of eight through adult. Students of all ages, levels and abilities have praised the simple step-by-step instructional approach. This site is respected as a resource for fine art educators, home schooling programs, and educational facilities throughout the world. LEARN-TO-DRAW BOOKS BY BRENDA HODDINOTT Drawing for Dummies (2003): Wiley Publishing, Inc., New, York, NY, this 336 page book is available on various websites and in major bookstores internationally. The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Drawing People (2004): Winner of the Alpha-Penguin Book of the Year Award 2004, Alpha - Pearson Education – Macmillan, Indianapolis, IN, this 360 page book is available on various websites and in major bookstores internationally.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web site http://www.finearteducation.com or http://www.drawspace.com
  18. 18. Brenda Hoddinott Y-02 ADVANCED: CREATING IN COLORIn this fun project, you use colored pencils to draw an adorable puppy. You focus on identifyingThis lesson includes the following eight sections:and rendering the light and shadow areas of various textures, forms, and colors.  Introduction  Suggested Supplies  Planning and Outlining  Adding Wobby’s Fur  Shading Eyes and Nose  Shading a Rainbow  Adding Final Touches  Challenge This lesson is recommended for artists with good drawing skills and a basic understanding of color theory, as well as advanced students of home schooling, academic and recreational fine art educators. 15 PAGES – 18 ILLUSTRATIONS Published by Drawspace.com, Halifax, NS, Canada – 2004 (Revised - July, 2009)
  19. 19. 2Wobby is “painted” with primary and secondary colored pencils. Because his face looked soINTRODUCTIONsad in my preliminary sketch, I chose to use mostly blue for his fur.To keep the drawing bright, I used other primary colors for this puppy, yellow for theinsides of his ears and the under pads of his paws, and red (almost pink) for his nose. Ichose stripes of both primary and secondary colors for his rainbow ribbon (bow). Burnishing is the application of a layer(s) of color (or white) over another by applying pressure to a pencil to blend colors together. Burnishing colored pencils can also be done with a tortillon or a firm plastic eraser. Cast shadow is a dark area on a surface, adjacent to where the light is blocked by an object. Contour drawings (also called line drawings) are comprised of lines which follow the contours of the various components of a drawing subject and define the outlines of its forms. Contrast measures the degree of difference between the light and dark values within shading, and creates the illusion of three-dimensions in a drawing. Foreshortening refers to the visual distortion of a person or object, when viewed at extreme angles. As the angle of viewing becomes more extreme the level of distortion becomes more pronounced. Graduated shading (also known as a graduation or graduated values) is a continuous progression of graduated values from dark to light or from light to dark. Grid is a framework of vertical and horizontal reference squares on an image and/or drawing paper, used by artists to either enlarge or reduce the size of the original image. Hatching is a series of lines drawn closely together to give the illusion of values. Light source is the direction from which a dominant light originates. Overlapping refers to the position of an object when it visually appears to be in front of another object. Perspective is the rendering of a three dimensional object or space within a two-dimensional drawing space. Shadows are the areas on an object that receive little or no light. Texture is the surface detail of an object, as defined in a drawing with various shading techniques. The senses of touch and sight help identify the surface texture of drawing subjects.  Heavy drawing paper or mat board, preferably a light color.SUGGESTED SUPPLIES  Sandpaper block or fine sandpaper to keep your pencils sharp.  Ruler (if you decide to use a grid).  HB graphite pencil.  Vinyl eraser.  24 colored pencils similar to the following:Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this document belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail brenda@drawspace.com Web site http://www.drawspace.com
  20. 20. 3 FIGURE 201 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 1 Orange 13 White 2 Light orange 14 Light gray 3 Yellow 15 Dark gray 4 Dark ochre 16 Dark brown 5 Dark green 17 Medium brown 6 Light green 18 Rust 7 Light sky blue 19 Pink 8 Medium blue 20 Light purple 9 Sapphire blue 21 Light red 10 Dark blue 22 Mauve 11 Dark violet 23 Dark red 12 Black 24 Medium red FIGURE 202In this section you plan your drawing andPLANNING AND OUTLININGoutline Wobby within your drawing space.My drawing surface is lightly textured acid-free mat board. Draw freehand if you wish –however, if you prefer using a grid, I addedone. My drawing is 4 by 5 inches (4 squaresacross by 5 squares down), which is quitetiny. You can do a larger drawing by simplyusing larger squares.1) Draw your grid lines VERY lightly, Don’t press too hard with your pencil or preferably with an HB pencil. your lines won’t erase later. Add numbers along the top and letters down the side (Figure 201).Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this document belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail brenda@drawspace.com Web site http://www.drawspace.com
  21. 21. 42) Sketch the basic outlines of the head, ears, body, and tail very lightly with your Begin with an HB pencil (Figures 203 to 205). outline of Wobby’s head FIGURE 203 and ears. Don’t forget the tuffs of fur on the top of his head! Outline the various parts of his eyes. Check out the close- up in Figure 204. Add his nose, chubby cheeks, tail, and ears. Outline his bow and the rose (optional). Refer to the close-up view in Figure 205. To keep the drawing a little simpler, feel free to leave out the rose. Add his body, legs, and paws (one of his FIGURE 204 back paws seems to be hidden behind his belly, but don’t worry, you add it later). When you’ve finished drawing the outlines, take a moment to carefully check that everything is in the correct place.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this document belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail brenda@drawspace.com Web site http://www.drawspace.com
  22. 22. 5 FIGURE 205 3) Erase the grid lines and redraw any sections that were Use the edge of your vinyl eraser to accidentally erased. erase the lines, and then very lightly brush away the eraser crumbs with a clean soft paintbrush. FIGURE 206Finally, useyourkneadederaser togently patthe paper’ssurface; itwill pick upanyremainingerasercrumbs.4) Use your kneaded eraser to lighten all your pencil lines until you can barely see them.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this document belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail brenda@drawspace.com Web site http://www.drawspace.com
  23. 23. 6In this section, you add colors to the fur. Use a sandpaper block or fine sandpaper to keepADDING WOBBY’S FURyour pencil points very sharp.If your goal is to create realistic-looking fur, make sure that each hatching line is drawn inthe direction in which the fur appears to “grow”. Use short, slightly curved, hatching lines to define the three-dimensional shapes of5) Use pencil 10 (dark blue) to create the darkest values. various parts of Wobby’s body. The light FIGURE 207 source is from the left front, so the shading is lighter on the left. Don’t miss the dark shadowed sections of his belly and neck; under his brows and bow; and on the side of his nose. The darkest shading is in the areas that are farthest away from the light source. The hatching lines are short, but of slightly different lengths. The light color of my drawing surface shows through in the light areas.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this document belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail brenda@drawspace.com Web site http://www.drawspace.com
  24. 24. 7 Dark shading, in such places as the flaps under the ears and the creases of the stitching, creates the illusion of depth. Some of your colors may be different than mine. Therefore test your 9 (sapphire blue)6) Select two middle values of blue. and 8 (medium blue) pencils (or two similar colors) and determine which is lighter and which is darker.7) Add FIGURE 208 medium values to Wobby’s Work from fur. the darkest colors toward the lightest to create a strong contrast in values. With the darker of pencils 8 and 9, add medium values that graduate toward the light sections. Use the lighter of the two blue pencils to add more fur to the sections of Wobby that are closer to the light source.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this document belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail brenda@drawspace.com Web site http://www.drawspace.com
  25. 25. 88) Add the lightest values in sections that are closest to and in direct exposure of the light source. FIGURE 209 Use your 13 (white) and 7 (light sky blue) pencils to add the light values to the fur. Pencil 7 (light sky blue) works well to graduate medium values towards the lightest sections. Hatching a few lines with a white pencil can make some of the light areas even lighter.9) Draw the yellow fur on his paws and the insides of his ears. You need the following pencils for drawing yellow fur: 2 (yellow), 4 (dark ochre), 13 (white), 16 (dark brown), 17 (medium brown), and 18 (rust).Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this document belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail brenda@drawspace.com Web site http://www.drawspace.com
  26. 26. 9 Begin shading the darkest yellow sections with pencils 16 and 17. Use VERY few dark shading lines. The fur needs to look yellow – not yucky brown! Also, add the middle values very sparingly with pencils 4 and 18. FIGURE 209 Use lots of 3 (yellow) to shade the light values. In the lightest areas, leave some sections of your drawing surface showing between your hatching lines. Use your 13 (white) to add some very light areas to the lightest sections of the yellow fur. The yellow fur is lighter on the left side of the drawing and is very dark in the shadow areas such as his back foot and under the upper section of the flap of his right ear.Wobby’s personality is illustrated by your handling of the shading of his eyes and nose.SHADING EYES AND NOSERemember, you have a certified artistic license to use your creativity and make any changesyou wish, including the colors of his eyes and (or) nose. Use a sandpaper block or finesandpaper to keep your pencil points sharp. But, remember - don’t press too hard withyour pencils unless you are burnishing!Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this document belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail brenda@drawspace.com Web site http://www.drawspace.com
  27. 27. 10  Irises: 5 (dark green), 3 (yellow), 16 (dark brown), and 18 (rust).10) Select the following colors for shading Wobby’s eyes:  Pupils: 12 (black).  Lower eyelid: 14 (light gray) and 15 (dark gray).  Highlights: 13 (white). FIGURE 210  The iris is darker at the top and on11) Note the following in Figure 210: the side where the large highlight is.  The lower eyelid is a dark gray.  A large highlight is on the upper left and a small one is on the lower right.  The lightest value of the iris is around the smaller highlight (on the lower right). Refer to Figures 210 and 211.12) Add shading to Wobby’s eyes. First of all, fill in the two large and two small highlights with your white pencil. The larger highlights are a little below the tops of the irises because the upper sections are in the shadows of the brows. With your 16 and 12 pencils, outline the circular perimeter of the irises. Shade in the upper section of the iris with your 16 pencil. Add shading to the lower sections of the irises with an 18 for the sections on the left, and a 5 for the sections on the right. Use your 3 pencil to burnish (blend) these two colors and 17 together so the iris seems shiny. Outline the lower edge of the rim of each eye with your 12 pencil. Use a 15 to shade in the rim of the eye. Burnish the center of FIGURE 211 the rim (or eyelid) with 14 to make it look shiny. Shade in the pupil with your 12 pencil.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this document belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail brenda@drawspace.com Web site http://www.drawspace.com
  28. 28. 11Compare your drawing of Wobby’s eyes to mine and make sure you’ve forgotten nothing.Touch up any areas you are not happy with.Time to add shading to his nose! The technique of burnishing your shading also works wellto help create its shiny texture.  12 (black): the darkest values on the inside of the nostrils, and for the darkest13) Sharpen the following colored pencils for his nose: shadow section of the fur on the lower right.  15 (dark gray): the outline of the left perimeter of the nose and the shading of the shadow sections of his nose on the right.  23 (dark red): the dark values on his nose.  21 (light red): the medium values.  19 (pink): the light values. Refer to Figure 212.14) Add shading to Wobby’s nose. Fill in the four highlights on the nose with your white pencil. Two circular highlights (a big and a small) are located on the top of the nose, and two small oval highlights are on the lower sections of the nose Take note of the reflected light sections on the left and bottom section of the nose and remember to leave them very light. Also remember to leave the highlights white. Add shading to the dark section of fur (the shadow created by the nose) in the lower right. Burnish the entire nose FIGURE 212 except for the highlights. Use 13 to burnish the light values, 19 to burnish the middle values, and 23 for the darker sections.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this document belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail brenda@drawspace.com Web site http://www.drawspace.com
  29. 29. 12Graduations are the primary ingredient in realistic shading. Some individual stripes of theSHADING A RAINBOWribbon have more than one value of a specific color, requiring a graduation from one valueto the next. The goal is to keep the transition between the different values flowing smoothlyinto one another.For each color you use a light, a medium, and a dark value. The first number in the listbelow represents the pencil I used for the darkest value, the second number the medium,and the third the lightest value:  Purple: 11, 22, and 20  Blue: 10, 8. and 7 FIGURE 213  Green: 12, 5, and 6  Yellow: 16, 4, and 3  Orange: 16, 1, and 2  Red: 16, 23, and 2415) Very lightly draw lines on the ribbon to identify the location of each As a ribbon curves in stripe. different directions some sections are closer to the viewer than others. Foreshortening creates the illusion that some stripes appear to be wide and others are narrow.16) Shade the rainbow Refer to Figures 213 to ribbon. 215. Use three different values of each color. You may need to apply a lot of pressure with your pencil to make the dark values. If the light colors are not quite light enough, you can burnish them with white. Each color in the bow is lighter on the left side of the drawing, closer to the light source. Take note that there are very few light values used for the sections of the ribbon on the right and under his chin.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this document belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail brenda@drawspace.com Web site http://www.drawspace.com
  30. 30. 13 Keep in mind that the rose is optional. You can draw it as is, leave it out, change the17) Add shading to the rose (if you have included it in your drawing). color, or replace it with something else such as a nametag or dog biscuit. Use your imagination! FIGURE 214 FIGURE 215 FIGURE 216In this section, you add Wobby’s other backADDING FINAL TOUCHESpaw, and some shading with horizontalhatching lines to create a cast shadow.With a tiny section of a fourth paw showingunder Wobby’s belly, he seems to be sittingmore firmly on the ground.Cast shadows give the illusion of weight bymaking it appear that the subject of yourdrawing is sitting on a surface.18) First outline and then shade in a tiny section of his right back paw (Figure Use the same colors as used for his 216). other four paws.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this document belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail brenda@drawspace.com Web site http://www.drawspace.com
  31. 31. 1419) Add shading to the FIGURE 217 cast shadow using lots First, lightly draw a few of different colors. parallel horizontal lines as guides. The shading of the cast shadow is darker closer to him and becomes gradually lighter as it moves outward.Take a few minutes to checkover your drawing, from thetop of his fluffy blue head FIGURE 218down to the yellow bottomsof his paws. Touch up anyareas that you are notcompletely happy with.If you wish you can outlinevarious sections of yourdrawing with freshlysharpened, dark coloredpencils.Sign your name and puttoday’s date on the back ofyour drawing!There are only three ways toimprove your drawing skills -practice, practice and morepractice!Grab more paper, and drawCHALLENGEsome more!Use your imagination andcolored pencils to drawanother cartoon animal.Maybe you could draw acartoon of an animal youknow well – such as your petor one belonging to someoneyou know.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this document belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail brenda@drawspace.com Web site http://www.drawspace.com
  32. 32. 15 As a self-educated teacher, visual artist, portraitist, forensic BRENDA HODDINOTT artist (retired), and illustrator, Brenda Hoddinott utilizes diverse art media including her favorites: graphite and paint. Brenda is the author of Drawing for Dummies (Wiley Publishing, Inc., New York, NY) and The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Drawing People (Winner of the Alpha-Penguin Book of the Year Award 2004, Alpha - Pearson Education – Macmillan, Indianapolis, IN). She is currently writing two books on classical drawing. My philosophy on teaching art is to focus primarily on the enjoyment aspects while gently introducing the technical and academic. Hence, in creating a passion for the subject matter, the quest for knowledge also becomes enjoyable. >Brenda Hoddinott<Born in St. John’s, Newfoundland, Brenda grew up in the small town of Corner Brook. Shedeveloped strong drawing and painting skills through self-directed learning.During her twenty-five year career as a self-educated civilian forensic artist, variouscriminal investigation departments have employed Brenda’s skills, including the RoyalCanadian Mounted Police. In 1992, Brenda was honored with a commendation from theRoyal Canadian Mounted Police, and in 1994, she was awarded a Certificate of Membershipfrom “Forensic Artists International”.In 2003, Brenda retired from her careers as a forensic artist and teacher to work full timewriting books and developing her website (Drawspace.com). This site is respected as aresource for fine art educators, home schooling programs, and educational facilitiesthroughout the world.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this document belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail brenda@drawspace.com Web site http://www.drawspace.com
  33. 33. DESIGNING A OF A GREASE MONKEY Brenda HoddinottY-O3 ADVANCED: CREATING IN COLORWith so many tattoo designs readily available,designing your very own personalized tattoo isnot for the faint of heart.This heavily illustrated diary demonstrates the process of designing an original tattoo of a greasemonkey, from its initial concept through to its final completion.This article is divided into the following three sections: THINKING WITH PAPER AND A PENCIL: As an artist, I prefer to think on paper; hence I begin to sketch a few ideas. Objects that I have not drawn previously are researched, and a final line drawing is prepared for shading. ADDING COLOR TO A MONKEY FACE: I first choose the colors I want to use and then add shading to the hair, face, ears, fur and eyes. My favorite medium for this type of drawing is colored pencils, which work well for coloring both big sections and tiny intricate details. SHADING A TIRE, WRENCH, FUR, AND CLOTHING: I add shading to the rest of the drawing, outline the basic shapes neatly in pen, and add a few final touches. The orange tones of his face and fur will contrast beautifully with the bright blue overalls.Suggested supplies: An HB mechanical pencil is used for the initial sketch. Colored pencils workwell for adding shading. The thin black outlines are drawn with Micron pens. 11 PAGES – 25 ILLUSTRATIONSThis article is recommended for adults with good drawing skills, a basic understanding of color, and experience usingcolored pencils. The curriculum is easily implemented into instructional programs for home schooling, academic and recreational learning environments. Published by Hoddinott Fine Art Publishers, Halifax, NS, Canada – 2007
  34. 34. 2 THINKING WITH PAPER AND A PENCIL About a month before my daughter, Heidi, got married, she called me with a request, “Can you design a tattoo for Chris; he would love to have a tattoo as my wedding gift to him”. Chris works as a mechanic for large working vehicles, such as tractors and large dump trucks. When Heidi suggested designing a grease monkey tattoo, ideas began floating around in my mind. As an artist, I prefer to think on paper; so, I begin to sketch a few ideas. Naturally, my initial thought was to draw a monkey. Never having drawn a monkey before, my first research project was to look on the Internet to find photos. With a basic concept of the shape of the face and ears, the rough sketch in Figure 301 escaped being thrown in the trash. This was getting close to what I envisioned, but not close enough. He looks like he is leaning on a barbell or a dog bone, rather than a wrench! Figure 301: The sketch that passed the first cuts. Time to research a little more and find out what a more realistic wrench looks like. By placing tracing paper over my rough sketch, I could easily refine the sketch and add a few extra details. I also decided to give him overalls and a facial expression that was a little less “cute and adorable” and more “manly”. Figure 302 shows a little more refined sketch of a monkey with a wrench. Figure 302: My first line drawing demonstrates my ideas a little more clearly. At this point, I showed the design concept to Heidi to get her ideas. She suggested that I have him leaning against a tire and holding a wrench. Ah ha! Perfect! Chris loves pretty much everything with tires and a motor, and they have a garage behind their home, even bigger than their house. The garage is always filled with “toys”, such as all terrain vehicles, mud-runners, motorcycles, cars, and trucks; all in various states of restoration.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  35. 35. 3 Compared to a motor, drawing a tire should be a piece of cake! Back to the drawing board! I used tracing paper to redraw the sections of the sketch that I wanted to change, such as replacing the oversized wrench with a tire. I moved his right hand up a little so it rested on top of the tire. The left hand held a wrench that is drawn with perspective so its end appears to be farther back than the front. When I was happy with the changes, I used Photoshop to overlay the new parts of the sketch onto the old Figure 303: The sketch. If you are not familiar with sketch is now Photoshop, you can easily erase the ready to be parts you don’t like and redraw new transformed into sections. a more detailed line drawing. If you are designing a tattoo for someone other than yourself, you really should show your design to the individual at this stage, before you get into the shading. He or she may also have ideas. When drawing a tattoo design, you have to keep in mind that the design needs to be kept as simple as possible. Even though the primary tool of a tattoo artist is a needle, extremely intricate details are more difficult to draw on the uneven surface of human flesh than on smooth paper. Also, keep in mind that tattoos can vary in size depending on what part of the body becomes the artist’s canvas. The actual tattoo may be smaller or larger than the drawing. Hence, you need to add enough details to work well for a larger tattoo, but also make sure that it is easy to simplify for a smaller tattoo. Heidi suggested that I have a red hankie hanging out of his pocket. She also sent me a photo of a tire. In addition to Heidi’s suggestions, I added larger eyes, a furry perimeter around his head and arms, a tail, (I almost forgot the tail!), and work boots. The final line drawing in Figure 304 is illustrated the same size as my actual drawing.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  36. 36. 4 Colored pencils are very difficult to erase, so I need to be sure that my outline is accurate. I’ve added a lot more details, so as to make life easier when I get to the shading. Take note of the shapes of the tire’s tread, the handkerchief hanging out of his pocket, the various parts of the rim of the tire, the seams of his overalls, the pupils, irises, and highlights of his eyes, Figure 304: The final and the addition of work line drawing is boots (instead of blobs complete and ready to where his feet belong). be colored. ADDING COLOR TO A MONKEY FACE In this section, I first choose colors and then add shading to the hair, face, ears, fur and eyes. My favorite medium for this type of drawing is colored pencils. I have tons of different colors to choose from, and colored pencils work well for both big sections and tiny details. The thin black outlines are drawn with a Micron 03 pen. The ink doesn’t fade and is archival; the tip doesn’t go blunt easily, and provides consistent line width. The paper is smooth and works well for both colored pencil and pen (Make sure you test your pencils and pen on the paper before you begin).Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  37. 37. 5 Defining light and shadow is more than simply using light colors for light areas and dark for the shadows. Hue must also be considered in terms of warm and cold colors. Any cool color, such as blue can be mixed with the other colors for shadows. Yellow mixed with the other colors helps create the illusion of light, and is a fantastic choice for warming the lightest values. Also, complementary colors will be utilized in the final stages of the drawing to further enhance the contrast between light and shadow. I begin by choosing a few shadow colors that will work well to darken all other colors. Most of the colors in this drawing will be oranges. Hence, blue, being the complement of orange, is a great choice for the overalls. Figure 305: Shadow colors include a bluish gray, a medium blue, a light blue, and black (which will be used VERY sparingly). Then I pick out a few skin colors that are easily darkened with the shadow colors. Yellow will be used only in the highlight areas to really bring out the illusion of light. Figure 306: Skin colors include light and dark flesh colors, a warm brown and a pale yellow. Chris is a redhead with blue eyes and a fair, pinkish complexion; hence, I’ll take this into consideration when choosing my colors. I want Chris’s red hair to stand out strongly. Hence my choices for his hair are the brightest I could find. The rest of his “fur” will be more subdued. Figure 307: The hair colors are very bright; red, orange, yellow, and a light flesh to tone down a few sections. I’ve already decided on an imaginary light source from the upper right front. The key, to making this cartoon look three dimensional, is to use this light source to navigate me through the placement of light and shadows. Now for the fun part! I begin with the ear on the left, partially because it’s not an important feature if I mess up. In addition, this section is in the upper left, so I won’t be smudging my drawing as I work from the upper left downward (if you’re left handed, work from the upper right downward). I made the hair style as close to Chris’s as a simple cartoon allows. Of course, I exaggerated the cowlicks! In addition, I added a few lines of darker color to show the direction in which his hair grows. Figure 308: The skin tones are burnished with a white pencil in the light sections, and the hair is burnished with bright yellow.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  38. 38. 6 The fur on his face, arms, and hands is made up of the following four colors along with a few of the shadow colors from Figure 305. Figure 309: The colors for the fur are not as bright as those for the hair. The eyes are shaded with two blues (Figure 310); a little dark gray is added in the shadow sections under the brow. The whites of the eyes are light blue, but will be a little darker in the final drawing. Figure 310: The blue eyes contrast sharply against the bright orange hair. Outlines in pen should be added after the shading is complete in each section. If you add colored pencil over the ink, the ink becomes dull. In addition, if the ink is not quite dry when you touch it with a colored pencil, it may smudge and ruin your drawing. The sections of fur on the right and left have shadow colors added to darken and tone down the brightness. The ears and nose are slightly pinker than the skin around his eyes and face. If you outline everything, your drawing becomes disjointed and cluttered. You can create lots of forms with the colored pencils alone. For example, only the outside edge of the ear on the right is outlined. Figure 311: This handsome monkey is actually beginning to look like my son-in-law! SHADING A TIRE, WRENCH, FUR, AND CLOTHING In this section, I complete the drawing by shading the clothing, tire, handkerchief, and wrench. The orange tones of his face and fur will contrast beautifully with the bright blue overalls. Blue and orange are complementary colors (as are red and green, or yellow and purple). When placed beside one another each looks brighter. To give you an idea of how I shade around a form, the lower section of the arm is incomplete (Figure 312). You can now compare the bright orange hair to the dull colors of the fur. The bright colors bring the viewer’s eye toward the upper section of the drawing.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com

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