Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
Increasing sharing, expanding user base,
and estimating impact of your research data
using service tools and social media
...
Help people discover, get, and use your product!
• If people do not know about or can not find and get your product, they
...
Peer-reviewed journals – a traditional way to share and reach out to your users
• Pros:
 A sense of objectiveness and mat...
Service Tools – Free sharing & working on your behalf (even when you are sleeping)
• Slideshare.com
 Large free space wit...
Service Tools – Free sharing & working on your behalf, Cont.
• Figshare.com
 Assigned DOIs almost right away: e.g., http:...
Social media – Free sharing with a wider audience
• Web story (CICS-NC & NCEI combined with twitter & Facebook)
 http://t...
Social media – Free sharing with a wider audience, Cont.
• Twitter.com – It is a dark, endless space out there. Is anybody...
• Facebook.com – Do you want your friends to see this?
 Free sharing of pictures and posts
• Linkedin.com – Do your colle...
More Social Media Tips
• Twitter
 Keep short (<130 characters) to allow room for re-tweeting
But – note new “retweet wit...
like-minded: having similar tastes, opinions, or interests
open-minded: receptive to new ideas (welcome and willing to lis...
So Are Your Comments!
gpeng@cicsnc.org
tmaycock@cicsnc.org
Follow CICS-NC on
Twitter - @CICSNC
Facebook - https://www.face...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Service Tools and Social Media Data Sharing Use Case

509 views

Published on

What to improve sharing and expand user base of your data? This presentation provides a use case study with some of the available service tools and social media in addition to peer-reviewed data publishing.

Published in: Data & Analytics
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Service Tools and Social Media Data Sharing Use Case

  1. 1. Increasing sharing, expanding user base, and estimating impact of your research data using service tools and social media Ge Peng & Tom Maycock June 25, 2015 Version 2.0 (Based on the 5/21/2015 CICS-NC Quarterly Update presentation)
  2. 2. Help people discover, get, and use your product! • If people do not know about or can not find and get your product, they won’t be able to use it. • If people do not use your product, you won’t be able to know if it is useful. • If you are not able to demonstrate that your product is useful and useable, you may not be able to sustain or improve on it.  There are other factors that may affect discoverability, accessibility, usefulness, and usability of your product. However, they are beyond the scope of this presentation.  It is not intended to cover all service tools but only to share our experience with those that we have used.
  3. 3. Peer-reviewed journals – a traditional way to share and reach out to your users • Pros:  A sense of objectiveness and maturity due to the peer-reviewing process  Assigned persistent Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) (e.g., http://dx.doi.org/10.2481/dsj.14-049)  Analytics for some journals – views, downloads (better use indicator than viewing counts) (e.g., the Earth System Science Data Journal: http://tinyurl.com/SICdataPaperMetrics)  Tracked citation - still most respected impact indicator • Cons  Limited feedback before being published (mostly from close colleagues)  Long publication process (~ 6 months to 2 years or never!)  Reviews can be subjective (essentially by 3 people who may or may not be very objective!)  Added cost ($1500 – $3000) – many online versions are now free Google Doc – easy & free way to share with your collaborators (not in China!)  Large space  Only to people you already know  No impact metrics
  4. 4. Service Tools – Free sharing & working on your behalf (even when you are sleeping) • Slideshare.com  Large free space with control on download setting (by invitation only or public)  They are actively reaching out to relevant users and sharing related content  Sophisticated analytics, e.g., http://tinyurl.com/DSMMintro  Views, viewers, downloads, sources, traffic sources, countries, etc.  Best analytics so far but no assigned DOI and version control Based on view metrics from slideshare.com Views - Top Countries
  5. 5. Service Tools – Free sharing & working on your behalf, Cont. • Figshare.com  Assigned DOIs almost right away: e.g., http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.1211954  Limited space for the free version  Limited analytics: only viewing and sharing action counts - more capability online late this year • Github.com – Not just for source code anymore  Version control  Private sharing is not free • Tinyurl.com – making long URLs usable in a customized way (twitter: 140 characters)  How many tinyurl links can you find in this presentation?
  6. 6. Social media – Free sharing with a wider audience • Web story (CICS-NC & NCEI combined with twitter & Facebook)  http://tinyurl.com/CICSNCwebStory  http://tinyurl.com/NCEIwebStory NCEI web story CICS-NC web story Weekly view metrics graph from slideshare.com
  7. 7. Social media – Free sharing with a wider audience, Cont. • Twitter.com – It is a dark, endless space out there. Is anybody listening? Yes, #TheyAre  Several tweets from March 26, 2015 with a link to http://tinyurl.com/DSMMtemplate  Over 35% increase in viewing (from 192 to 264 as of 5/20/2015)  Using certain # tags seems to work better Social Media Tip #1:  Be selective and careful with Hashtags!  Not case sensitive.  Is it already used? #NCA2014 on Twitter
  8. 8. • Facebook.com – Do you want your friends to see this?  Free sharing of pictures and posts • Linkedin.com – Do your colleagues really care? • ResearchGate.com – They tend to work too hard on your behalf!  Frequent update on profile and publications viewing, and downloads  They should limit their e-mails to weekly updates except for publication requests • E-mail list – Reaching people interested in your work. Some tips on mailing list:  Create the list based on your stakeholders, including users  Allow people to subscribe or unsubscribe your list  Focus on providing useful information (We tend to read those with content on the subject of our interests; dislike service-only e-mails)  Be mindful about how often you send e-mails to the group (not too often) • Face-to-face – Still the most effective way to reach out to people who share your vision  Conferences and workshops (added cost), seminars, group or one-on-one meetings Communication is the key!
  9. 9. More Social Media Tips • Twitter  Keep short (<130 characters) to allow room for re-tweeting But – note new “retweet with comment” feature  Use period before username when replying  Utilize photo or image! • Facebook  Again, shorter is better (<130 characters)  < 40 characters = higher engagement rate  Photo or image! • Hashtags  Twitter: two or fewer per tweet  Facebook: one per post
  10. 10. like-minded: having similar tastes, opinions, or interests open-minded: receptive to new ideas (welcome and willing to listen to new ideas first, then decide on whether to accept or reject it) broad-minded: tolerant of a wide range of ideas, people, social behavior, etc. (even if they may not agree with others’ ideas or beliefs) “Seeking those who are like-minded; Pursuing those who are open-minded; Promoting those who are broad-minded!” - Ge Peng, 5/9/2015 Sharing is a beautiful thing! Feel free to pass it on …
  11. 11. So Are Your Comments! gpeng@cicsnc.org tmaycock@cicsnc.org Follow CICS-NC on Twitter - @CICSNC Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/cicsnc

×