JOB ROLES WITHIN TV
CAMERA OPERATOR (Studio/Outside)
What is the job?
Studio/Outside Broadcast Camera Operator is a role within television cam...
SCRIPT SUPERVISOR
What is the job?
Script Supervisors work as part of the Camera Department on Television Dramas. They ens...
MAKE UP AND HAIR ARTIST
What is the job?
Make-up and Hair Artists work on feature films, in television, on commercials, po...
DIRECTOR
What is the job?
Directors are responsible for the look and sound of a production and its technical standards, as...
RESEARCHER
What is the job?
Researchers originate or develop program ideas. They are fact checkers and the ‘brief’ writers...
GAFFER
What is the job?
Gaffers work on all genres of television programming, including multi-camera and single camera sho...
BOOM OPERATOR
What is the job?
Good, clear sound is vital to TV productions, and Boom Operators play an important role wit...
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Jobs in tv

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Jobs in tv

  1. 1. JOB ROLES WITHIN TV
  2. 2. CAMERA OPERATOR (Studio/Outside) What is the job? Studio/Outside Broadcast Camera Operator is a role within television camera departments. Their responsibilities vary depending on the type of production, but they usually cover all types of outside-broadcast and studio-based programmes. Camera Operators ensure that all the cameras and associated equipment are ready for the required set-up. They must be able to multi-task, to watch, listen, take instructions from the director and think on their feet while carrying out complex tasks. They may have to supervise Assistants to move the camera and may work closely with performers, giving them constructive advice. Key Skills… -ability to carry out instructions with great accuracy and attention to detail -ability to frame and compose shots and perform camera moves with precision and speed -in-depth knowledge of the principles of camera work -good IT skills -knowledge of the relevant electronics -excellent communication, interpersonal and diplomatic skills -good colour vision, and excellent hand-to-eye co-ordination -physical stamina for working long hours and moving heavy equipment -knowledge of the requirements of the relevant Health and Safety legislation and procedures Training/Qualifications… No specific qualifications are required to work in this role. Camera Operators usually learn most of their practical skills through hands-on experience on the job, but as technology changes, professional development is vital. BBC Training and Development and the National Film and Television School are among the training providers offering industry recognised short courses.
  3. 3. SCRIPT SUPERVISOR What is the job? Script Supervisors work as part of the Camera Department on Television Dramas. They ensure that everything makes continuous verbal and visual sense. This means keeping detailed records of dialogue, action, costumes, props and set design which will make the editing of the scenes a lot easier. Script Supervisors closely observe every shot filmed, and take detailed notes. They are involved during pre–production and principal photography in long hours (12–14 hours a day), and some foreign travel may be required. During pre–production they check the script for any errors or inconsistencies, prepare estimated running times, and break down the script according to production requirements. They develop story synopses and character breakdowns, check the shooting schedule, attend pre–production meetings, and during rehearsals they record detailed timings which inform the shooting schedule. They work closely with Directors to solve any potential problems. Key Skills… -attention to detail -to collaborate, and to work as part of a team -sensitivity when working with artists and crew -ability to trouble shoot and respond quickly to changing circumstances -good organisational skills -ability to stay calm in difficult situations -a practical approach to work Training/Qualifications… Although no formal qualifications are required to become a Script Supervisor, some film schools and training courses offer a good basic grounding in the skills and knowledge required. Knowledge of grammar of film making and of editing, as well as relevant industry experience is essential. A full driving licence is also useful.
  4. 4. MAKE UP AND HAIR ARTIST What is the job? Make-up and Hair Artists work on feature films, in television, on commercials, pop promos, productions, entertainment programmes, documentary dramas, etc. Make-up and Hair are key elements in the overall design of films or television productions, and Make-up and Hair Artists must be experienced in using a wide variety of professional make-up and hair products in order to create looks that meet production requirements. They also work with wigs, and facial and false hair. Make-up and Hair Artists are employed throughout pre-production and production and their hours are long and the job can involve long periods working away from home. They make appointments for actors to wig fittings, facial hair fittings, prosthetic castings, optician and dental appointments, ensuring that actors are comfortable with their look, and check for any allergies. Key Skills… -hairdressing skills including: cutting, waving, straightening, non permanent colouring, setting, applying extensions, braiding, shaving; wig setting and dressing; and applying, dressing and applying facial hair -make-up skills including: straight corrective; ageing face, hands and neck; contouring effects; and some specialised techniques such as creating tattoos and body-painting -excellent organisational skills -good presentation skills -ability to work effectively as part of a team Training/Qualifications… All Make-up and Hair Artists should have achieved at least a Level 2 vocational qualification or equivalent in Media Makeup, and a level 2-3 NVQ in Hairdressing or the equivalent of two years experience. Experience of working in a salon, theatre, or wig makers is also helpful. At all levels, personality and the right attitude are extremely important. A full EU driving licence is essential.
  5. 5. DIRECTOR What is the job? Directors are responsible for the look and sound of a production and its technical standards, as well as ensuring that the final programme matches the original concept. Directors work closely with all Heads of Department, including Designers, Camera, Sound, Lighting and Choreographers and they work across all genres, including news, sport, documentaries, current affairs, light entertainment, children's programmes, situation comedies, soaps or serial dramas, or one-off dramas. Directors may be employed by broadcasters, or work on a freelance basis. They must have a clear creative vision of the project and what materials are required to achieve it. They must also prepare a shooting schedule which provides the required footage within budget and to deadlines. Key Skills… -ability to think visually -precise attention to detail -high stress tolerance and stamina -knowledge of the entire production process -excellent verbal and written communication skills -ability to lead a team and to motivate actors and crew members -problem solving skills -budgeting and financial skills Training/Qualifications… Although no specific qualifications are required for the role of Director, a degree in a media related, drama or specialist subject may provide some useful background information. Wide experience in and knowledge of the production process is essential. Successful completion of specialist training or courses in single and multi-camera directing is required.
  6. 6. RESEARCHER What is the job? Researchers originate or develop program ideas. They are fact checkers and the ‘brief’ writers for on screen presenters, and they present their findings to decision makers. Researchers must understand relevant legislation and regulations, ensuring that legal and copyright requirements are met. They may be employed by broadcasters, or work on a freelance basis. Researchers may contribute to the development of the scripts and may brief others who write so that they can deliver what is required. They may also be asked to check final written materials for accuracy and some may also be required to prepare production materials for external use, including fact sheets, books and booklets, publicity material such as production billings, press releases, related websites, and text pages. Key Skills… -excellent verbal and written communication skills -excellent presentation skills -ability to think visually -problem solving skills -advanced IT skills -sensitivity when working with writers, producers, actors, presenters, other contributors and crew members -current knowledge of the relevant legislation, regulations, and associated procedures, including Copyright, Data Protection -knowledge of the health and safety requirements Training/Qualifications… Although no specific educational or training qualifications are required for the role of Researcher, a degree in a media related, drama or specialist subject may provide some useful background information. Experience in pre-production and production processes is required.
  7. 7. GAFFER What is the job? Gaffers work on all genres of television programming, including multi-camera and single camera shoots, in studios and on locations. They report to the Lighting Director, Director of Photography, the Lighting Company or the Production Company. They are responsible for all the practical aspects of lighting sets and locations and they collaborate closely with Lighting Directors. Gaffers may be employees of broadcasters or of lighting facilities companies or they may work as freelances. They must produce a list of the required equipment, e.g. lamps, cables, generators, and request quotations from Lighting Companies. If the quotations are over budget for the production, Gaffers may solutions during discussions with Lighting Directors or Production personnel. Key Skills… -a wide knowledge of television lighting and associated equipment -an understanding of all aspects of television production -excellent IT skills -good problem solving skills -good communication and team skills -patience, self-discipline and reliability -ability to concentrate for long periods of time and to pay attention to detail -knowledge of the Health and Safety requirements Training/Qualifications… Creative Skillset has developed a National Vocational Qualification at Level 4 for Gaffers which is awarded by City and Guilds and assessed by FT2. Gaffers must be fully qualified electricians, with relevant City and Guilds or Electrical Engineering qualifications, OND or HND.
  8. 8. BOOM OPERATOR What is the job? Good, clear sound is vital to TV productions, and Boom Operators play an important role within the production process, working under the direction of the Sound Supervisor/Production Mixer to achieve the best quality sound recording. Jobs in sound are usually split into two sections: production sound and post–production sound. Boom Operators work in production sound and they can get work through personal contacts, on the basis of their reputation, or as part of a regular crew. Boom Operators are often expected to work long hours which may involve long periods away from home. The job is not only about positioning microphones or following the instructions, it also involves accurately hearing sound, knowing what the camera is shooting and understanding camera lenses and focal lengths. Key Skills… -excellent hearing, concentration and attention to detail -knowledge of microphone characteristics, lighting techniques and camera angles -good hand/eye co–ordination; -physical strength and excellent balance -good memory for dialogue -good communication and team skills -sensitivity when working with artistes and crew members -willingness to work long and irregular hours Training/Qualifications… Although there are no formal entry requirements for Boom Operators, there are Courses are available throughout the UK, including City & Guilds qualifications, BTEC National Certificates and Diplomas, Foundation degrees and first degrees, and postgraduate degrees and diplomas. Relevant subjects include audio and recording technology, sound engineering, music technology, film and TV production, and media production (sound recording).

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