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Theme 2: State of the Art? 
Transformational Learning 
Design for Open and 
Blended Learning 
George Roberts 
Oxford Brook...
Acknowledgements 
• Richard Francis 
– Francis, R & Roberts, G. 2014. “Where Is the New 
Blended Learning? Whispering Corn...
Conundrum 
Practical Wisdom 
Activity 
Experience 
Dialogue 
Reflection 
Participation 
Community
Blended learning design 
• Activity 
– we do or make things in groups (social constructivism: Vygotsky 1934, 1962; 
Engest...
Snapping at the heels of the 
state of the art
Actually existing art 
• Closed online 
• Open online 
• Flipped 
• Blended 
• Accredited or not 
• Traditional modular 
•...
Activity 
Affective recall 
Think of a learning situation, a 
course, module, CPD workshop, etc, 
where you felt anxious, ...
Conundrum 
• Why do we still find learners, 
institutions and the curriculum in 
such tension over technology 
enhanced le...
A journey of the mind 
Through quite abstract 
spaces 
Challenge our thinking 
about technology 
enhanced learning 
The ro...
The blended learning debate has 
been locked in antagonisms 
Poly-valent, multimodal tensions: bits v. atoms, virtual v. r...
flexible, active, 
collaborative 
and 
professionally 
authentic 
pedagogies
“... an 
industrialised 
process, on a 
truly massive 
scale, made 
possible by 
new 
technology.”
the 
landscape of 
the virtual 
world has 
altered 
beyond 
recognition
It is difficult to argue that the 
physical and virtual dimensions of 
the learning experience are still 
distinct, or in ...
In practice, the pedagogical models 
have hardly changed at all
a place 
between the 
virtual and the 
real, whose 
genius loci is 
the teacher 
the main function of teaching is to 
insp...
Where change has been most evident 
• Blending the once largely distinct 
domains of “learning” and “socialising” 
• Foreg...
Have we failed? 
Pedagogically
Learners create their own 
learning environment outside, 
inside and in-despite of the 
intentions of the institution or 
...
Viceroy’s Palace 
Tavern of 
revolution
It is the ‘inter’ … the inbetween space 
– that carries the burden of the 
meaning of culture... 
And by exploring this Th...
the space of both 
community and 
identity
In this sense of liminality, 
discomfort and uncertainty, 
blended learning might be seen as 
a threshold concept
Where once the 
Internet seemed a vast 
third space, it now 
appears hegemonised 
by contingent global 
forces where 
inte...
Moves to more 
open forms of 
education have 
opened the 
sluice gates 
Physical spaces as a central 
element of learning ...
Reclaiming space for teaching through 
blended learning includes reclaiming 
technologies as intermediate tools
Summarise 
• Blended learning, itself, is a threshold concept: liminal, 
uncomfortable, uncertain and transforming 
• Each...
Blended learning design 
• Activity 
– we do or make things in groups (social constructivism: Vygotsky 1934, 1962; 
Engest...
• If all learning IS blended learning 
• AND neither the physical NOR the digital 
has primacy 
• AND each person and plac...
For us, these follow 
• Acknowledge the tension in all teaching 
• Avoid totalising syntheses of data, content or 
process...
Thank you 
George Roberts 
Richard Francis 
Oxford Brookes University 
November 2014 
groberts@brookes.ac.uk
Copyright and Takedown Notice 
If you are a rights holder and are concerned that you have found 
material on our website o...
Transformational Learning Design for Open and Blended Learning
Transformational Learning Design for Open and Blended Learning
Transformational Learning Design for Open and Blended Learning
Transformational Learning Design for Open and Blended Learning
Transformational Learning Design for Open and Blended Learning
Transformational Learning Design for Open and Blended Learning
Transformational Learning Design for Open and Blended Learning
Transformational Learning Design for Open and Blended Learning
Transformational Learning Design for Open and Blended Learning
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Transformational Learning Design for Open and Blended Learning

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#Design4Learning 2014 Conference: From blended learning to learning analytics in HE: Theme 2 - State of the art?

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Transformational Learning Design for Open and Blended Learning

  1. 1. Theme 2: State of the Art? Transformational Learning Design for Open and Blended Learning George Roberts Oxford Brookes University 27 November 2014
  2. 2. Acknowledgements • Richard Francis – Francis, R & Roberts, G. 2014. “Where Is the New Blended Learning? Whispering Corners of the Forum.” Brookes Electronic Journal of Learning and Teaching (BeJLT) 6 (1) – http://bejlt.brookes.ac.uk/paper/where-is-the-new-blended- learning-whispering-corners-of-the-forum/ • Frances Deepwell • Mary Dean • Greg Benfield
  3. 3. Conundrum Practical Wisdom Activity Experience Dialogue Reflection Participation Community
  4. 4. Blended learning design • Activity – we do or make things in groups (social constructivism: Vygotsky 1934, 1962; Engeström 2001) • Experience – self-evaluative, practitioner-centered, pragmatic (Dewey 1916) • Dialogue – We engage with language over time: synchronously, asynchronously and in many modes (Bakhtin 1981) • Reflection – Bringing experience into scholarly evidence (Brookfield 1995, Kolb 1984) • Participation – The teacher is also a learner (Warhurst 2006, Dyrness 2008) • Community – (Mathie & Cunningham 2003, McClenaghan 2000, Becher & Trowler 2001) • Outcomes
  5. 5. Snapping at the heels of the state of the art
  6. 6. Actually existing art • Closed online • Open online • Flipped • Blended • Accredited or not • Traditional modular • CPD
  7. 7. Activity Affective recall Think of a learning situation, a course, module, CPD workshop, etc, where you felt anxious, disempowered, uncertain. With a neighbour, in pairs, interview each other, 3 minutes each way: • Can you characterise the things that made you feel that way? Paintings by Theodore Zeldin
  8. 8. Conundrum • Why do we still find learners, institutions and the curriculum in such tension over technology enhanced learning (TEL), in an environment of ambiguity, anxiety, power and ideology (Morrison 2014)?
  9. 9. A journey of the mind Through quite abstract spaces Challenge our thinking about technology enhanced learning The role and place of universities in the vast virtualised spaces that we have created
  10. 10. The blended learning debate has been locked in antagonisms Poly-valent, multimodal tensions: bits v. atoms, virtual v. real, totalising grand narratives v. little local initiatives v. essentialist techno-optimism v. neo-classical or traditional Luddism v. hyper-relativist social media identity play, etc etc
  11. 11. flexible, active, collaborative and professionally authentic pedagogies
  12. 12. “... an industrialised process, on a truly massive scale, made possible by new technology.”
  13. 13. the landscape of the virtual world has altered beyond recognition
  14. 14. It is difficult to argue that the physical and virtual dimensions of the learning experience are still distinct, or in any way opposed.
  15. 15. In practice, the pedagogical models have hardly changed at all
  16. 16. a place between the virtual and the real, whose genius loci is the teacher the main function of teaching is to inspire learners to venture into unfamiliar territory
  17. 17. Where change has been most evident • Blending the once largely distinct domains of “learning” and “socialising” • Foregrounding the transactional component of the social learning space as a “one stop shop” for student services
  18. 18. Have we failed? Pedagogically
  19. 19. Learners create their own learning environment outside, inside and in-despite of the intentions of the institution or the designer.
  20. 20. Viceroy’s Palace Tavern of revolution
  21. 21. It is the ‘inter’ … the inbetween space – that carries the burden of the meaning of culture... And by exploring this Third Space, we may elude the politics of polarity and emerge as the others of our selves. (Bhabha 2004)
  22. 22. the space of both community and identity
  23. 23. In this sense of liminality, discomfort and uncertainty, blended learning might be seen as a threshold concept
  24. 24. Where once the Internet seemed a vast third space, it now appears hegemonised by contingent global forces where international competition is normalised and consumer debt a virtue
  25. 25. Moves to more open forms of education have opened the sluice gates Physical spaces as a central element of learning appear ever more fluid
  26. 26. Reclaiming space for teaching through blended learning includes reclaiming technologies as intermediate tools
  27. 27. Summarise • Blended learning, itself, is a threshold concept: liminal, uncomfortable, uncertain and transforming • Each person and context is a hybrid: utterly unique • No cultural origin is privileged • Learning occurs in the gaps: the spaces between • Learning growth is non linear • People only partly inhabit any space and do so on their own terms • All learning spaces are co-created • Social, learning, and transactional space are blending physically and digitally • The spirit of the third space is “the teacher” • Any enclosure of space requires force, power or violence
  28. 28. Blended learning design • Activity – we do or make things in groups (social constructivism: Vygotsky 1934, 1962; Engeström 2001) • Experience – self-evaluative, practitioner-centred, pragmatic (Dewey 1916) • Dialogue – We engage with language over time: synchronously, asynchronously and in many modes (Bakhtin 1981) • Reflection – Bringing experience into scholarly evidence (Brookfield 1995, Kolb 1984) • Participation – The teacher is also a learner (Warhurst 2006, Dyrness 2008) • Community – (Mathie & Cunningham 2003, McClenaghan 2000, Becher & Trowler 2001) • Outcomes
  29. 29. • If all learning IS blended learning • AND neither the physical NOR the digital has primacy • AND each person and place is unique • How do we respond?
  30. 30. For us, these follow • Acknowledge the tension in all teaching • Avoid totalising syntheses of data, content or process – even this! • Practice “bounded openness”: provide multiple ways in and out • Respect the uniqueness of each and every person. • It’s the relationship, not the gadgets or analytics
  31. 31. Thank you George Roberts Richard Francis Oxford Brookes University November 2014 groberts@brookes.ac.uk
  32. 32. Copyright and Takedown Notice If you are a rights holder and are concerned that you have found material on our website or legitimately under our name elsewhere, for which you have not given permission, or is not covered by a limitation or exception in laws of the UK or other countries (as relevant), please contact us in writing stating the following: • Your contact details • The full bibliographic details of the materials • The exact and full URL or other location where you found the material • Proof that you are the rights holder and a statement that, under penalty of perjury, you are the rights holder or are an authorised representative Upon receipt of notification the Oxford Brookes University 'Notice and Take down' procedure [LINK] is then invoked. © 2014 Oxford Brookes University, Headington Campus, Gipsy Lane, Oxford OX3 0BP, UK Tel: +44 (0)1865 74 1111

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