Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

A2 CAMBRIDGE GEOGRAPHY: GLOBAL INTERDEPENDENCE - THE MANAGEMENT OF A TOURIST DESTINATION - JAMAICA

187 views

Published on

A2 CAMBRIDGE GEOGRAPHY: GLOBAL INTERDEPENDENCE - THE MANAGEMENT OF A TOURIST DESTINATION - JAMAICA

Published in: Education
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

A2 CAMBRIDGE GEOGRAPHY: GLOBAL INTERDEPENDENCE - THE MANAGEMENT OF A TOURIST DESTINATION - JAMAICA

  1. 1. A2GEOGRAPHY GLOBALINTERDEPENDENCE 13.4 THEMANAGEMENTOF ATOURISTDESTINATIONJAMAICA
  2. 2. WHAT IS A TOURIST ATTRACTION? A tourist attraction is a place where tourists visit, for its natural or cultural value, historical significance, natural or built beauty, offering leisure and amusement. Natural beauty such as beaches, tropical island resorts with coral reefs, national parks, mountains, deserts and forests, are examples of traditional tourist attractions. Cultural tourist attractions include historical places, monuments, ancient temples, zoos, museums and art galleries, botanical gardens, buildings and structures like castles or bridges, theme parks and carnivals, living history museums, historic trains and cultural events. Many tourist attractions are also landmarks.
  3. 3. TOURISM IN JAMAICA – THE BEGINNING Christopher Columbus - on his inaugural voyage to Jamaica - was struck by the island’s beauty. These natural attributes proved to be invaluable assets when in 1891 the government sought to explore the “economic potential of the colony.” The decision to stage an “International Exhibition” in Jamaica during that year fuelled the idea that “the Exhibition would bring many to Jamaica for the first time who would make known the advantages of Jamaica as a winter resort to others and thus lay the foundation for a steady and increasing flow of tourists to the island.” This signalled the “beginning of government’s commitment” to the development of the tourist industry.
  4. 4. Source: http://www.jtbonline.org/tourism-in-jamaica/
  5. 5. JAMAICA’S HISTORICAL HOTELS
  6. 6. TOURISM IN JAMAICA – THE BEGINNING Jamaica is the third largest of the Caribbean islands. Tourism (Figure 13.12 on next slide) originated in the latter part of the nineteenth century when a limited number of affluent people arrived to avoid the cold winters in the UK and North America. The first tourist hotels were built in Montego Bay and Port Antonio.
  7. 7. TOURISM IN JAMAICA – POTENTIAL DESTINATION Advances in transportation made Jamaica a potential destination for an increasing number of people. In 2005 a total of 2,614,506 visited Jamaica. This comprised: 1,386,996 foreign nationals, 91,667 non-resident Jamaicans and 1,135,843 cruise passengers. The high or ‘winter’ season runs from mid-December to mid-April. The rainy season extends from May to November. About 25% of hotel workers are laid off during the off-season.
  8. 8. TOURISM IN JAMAICA – GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT Jamaica is an example of a tourist area where there has been clear evidence of growth and development. As the industry has expanded, its linkages with other industries have developed as well. Tourism has become an increasingly vital part of Jamaica’s economy in recent decades (Table 13.2). In 2007 the direct contribution to GDP was almost $1.2 billion; with all the indirect benefits added the figure was $3.8 billion. The contribution of tourism to total employment has also risen substantially.
  9. 9. JAMAICANISATION During the 1970s the Jamaican government introduced ‘Jamaicanisation’ policies designed to attract much-needed foreign investment in tourism. Policies included comparatively high wages and special industry taxes that went directly into social development, health care and education. Jamaica has been determined to learn from the ‘mistakes’ of other countries and ensure that the population will gain real benefits from the growth of tourism.
  10. 10. GLOSSARY Growth (of tourism) refers to the increase in numbers of tourists. Development (of tourism) refers to the expansion of tourism activities such as adventure tourism and ecotourism.
  11. 11. ATTRACTIONS Jamaica’s north coast, with its pleasant weather and white-sand beaches, is the centre of the island’s tourist industry. The main resorts are Montego Bay, Ocho Rios and Port Antonio, although many tourists also visit the capital city, Kingston. While sun and sand are the main attractions, the island also has other attributes including dolphin parks, nature reserves, museums and galleries. There are excellent facilities for a range of sports. Jamaica’s cuisine is an attraction for many visitors. There are many festivals and entertainment events during the year, often featuring Jamaica’s native music, reggae.
  12. 12. NATIONAL PARKS Figure 13.12 shows the location of Jamaica’s three national parks. A further six sites have been identified for future protection. The Jamaican government sees the designation of the parks as a positive environmental impact of tourism. Entry fees to the national parks pay for conservation. The two marine parks are attempting to conserve the coral reef environments off the west coast of Jamaica. They are at risk of damage from overfishing, industrial pollution and mass tourism.
  13. 13. ECOTOURISM Ecotourism is a developing sector of the industry with, for example, raft trips on the Rio Grande river increasing in popularity. Tourists are taken downstream in very small groups. The rafts, which rely solely on manpower, leave singly with a significant time gap between them to minimise any disturbance to the peace of the forest. Ecotourism is seen as the most sustainable form of tourist activity. Considerable efforts are being made to promote community tourism so that more money filters down to the local population and small communities. Community tourism is seen as an important aspect of ‘pro-poor tourism’.
  14. 14. COMMUNITY TOURISM Community tourism fosters opportunities at the community level for local people. Part of the tourist income gained is set aside for projects that provide benefits to the community as a whole. Pro-poor tourism results in increased net benefits for poor people.

×