Bhaskar :: Deploying GT.M based TCP services with xinetd

2,613 views

Published on

Published in: Technology
1 Comment
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • you speaks too fast
    or your audio have some problems
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
2,613
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
36
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
27
Comments
1
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Bhaskar :: Deploying GT.M based TCP services with xinetd

  1. 1. Deploying GT.M applications with xinetd K.S. Bhaskar Fidelity National Information Services. Inc. ks.bhaskar@fnis.com +1 (610) 578­4265 http://fis­gtm.com
  2. 2. GT.M philosophy • “Small is beautiful” – Applies to conceptual simplicity not to capability (GT.M  today runs the largest real time core processing system  live at any bank anywhere in the world) – An ecosystem of components where each does its job  well, and uses other components for what they do well – An enhancement or fix to a component is immediately  available to all that use it – Also the UNIX/Linux philosophy 2
  3. 3. The bazaar vs. the cathedral • So many choices – inetd / xinetd – sh / ksh / bash / csh ... – AIX / Solaris / HP­UX / Linux • Red Hat / SuSE / Ubuntu ...  • Vs. just choose one vendor to provide the whole ball of wax – Fly on auto pilot, no need to think 3
  4. 4. Simple setup • TCP port in /etc/services • Service in a file in /etc/xinetd.d • Shell script or program to provide service (Walk through example) 4
  5. 5. Benefits of xinetd – Internet superserver • Access control • Protection against denial of service attacks • Logging • Bind services to IP addresses • Simplified application server logic – Process starts with STDIN/STDOUT ($Principal)  connected to client – Only needs to implement application specific  communication – Only requires normal user privileges 5
  6. 6. Access control • Address, name, domain name of remote host • Time of access 6
  7. 7. Protection against DOS attacks via limits • Number of servers for each service • Number of process forked • Size of log files • Number of connections from a single host • System load Security is based on layers of protection – an Internet  superserver like xinetd is just one more layer. 7
  8. 8. Optional logging • For all connection attempts, successful as well as failing – Time server was started – Remote host address – Remote user id (if supported by remote server – not  likely for an attacker) • How long server ran • More 8
  9. 9. ¿¿Questions??  ¡¡Comments!! K.S. Bhaskar ks.bhaskar@fnis.com +1 (610) 578-4265 9

×