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Feedback: it's not marking but expert teaching.

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Slides used at #TLT14 (Teaching and Learning Takeover Conference 2014) at the University of Southampton on 18th October 2014.

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Feedback: it's not marking but expert teaching.

  1. 1. Feedback: it’s not marking, it’s expert teaching David Rogers #TLT14
  2. 2. @davidErogers davidrogers.org.uk
  3. 3. How do you know that feedback is taking place in your school? What a top event! Really?
  4. 4. When was the last time you had a proper Mystery Amazing Place look at your learning environment? Write a detailed description of what you’d expect to see in this place. Hear Smell Feel Taste Touch See Image copyright of Pshychogeographer
  5. 5. Microsoft Expert educator, Google certified teacher, Marathon Runner, Adventurer, Author, Pedagogic Troublemaker, Fellow of the RGS, Dream Teacher, Dad, Husband, Welshman, Geographer, Assistant Head, Microsoft Expert educator, Google certified teacher, Marathon Runner, Adventurer, Author, Pedagogic Troublemaker, Fellow of the RGS, Dream Teacher, Dad, Husband, Welshman, Geographer, Assistant Head, Microsoft Expert educator, Google certified teacher, Marathon Runner, Adventurer, Author, Pedagogic Troublemaker, Fellow of the RGS, Dream Teacher, Dad, Husband, Welshman, Geographer, Assistant Head, Microsoft Expert educator, Google certified teacher, Marathon Runner, Adventurer, Author, Pedagogic
  6. 6. Holy Grail v Tool Shed Holy Grail photo Source via Flickr and a CC licence. Toolbox photo source via Flickr and a CC licence
  7. 7. Loads of written comments Student doesn’t engage with marking Student work is rubbish Appropriate Feedback, variety and timing Student work is better What is feedback?
  8. 8. What are pupil premium students like?
  9. 9. Poor Kid, deprived, Can’t Learn, Low Ability, Stuck There, Poor Kid, deprived, Can’t Learn, Low Ability, Stuck There, Poor Kid, deprived, Can’t Learn, Low Ability, Stuck There, Poor Kid, deprived, Can’t Learn, Low Ability, Stuck There, Poor Kid, deprived, Can’t Learn, Low Ability, Stuck There, Poor Kid, deprived, Can’t Learn, Low Ability, Stuck There, Poor Kid, deprived, Can’t Learn, Low Ability, Stuck There, Poor Kid, deprived, Can’t Learn, Low Ability, Stuck There, Poor Kid, deprived, Can’t Learn, Low Ability, Stuck There, Poor Kid, deprived, Can’t Learn, Low Ability, Stuck There, Poor Kid, deprived, Can’t Learn, Low Ability, Stuck There, Poor Kid, deprived, Can’t Learn, Low Ability, Stuck There, deprived, Can’t Learn, Low
  10. 10. When did you last look past the data?
  11. 11. The well rounded student. Where is feedback in your school aimed? Self image Experience Lessons and teaching Contacts and networks
  12. 12. Should feedback be different for Pupil Premium students? If so, how?
  13. 13. Is the most useful form of feedback from teachers to students?
  14. 14. In LP, everyone is a student and everyone is a teacher. Led by pupils; guided by professionals; focused on learning.
  15. 15. Art graphics up 32% Technology Graphics up 25% Technology Textiles up 15% Science Core up 18%
  16. 16. Do we give too much feedback to students? Is it the right type? Is it useful?
  17. 17. Talk to each other. Describe what you expect to see in the rest of this image. Draw it with your non-dominant hand. Describe it in Russian using Google Translate Draw it with your eyes closed. Describe the whole scene in 287 words.
  18. 18. Learning exhibitions
  19. 19. ‘…there was a clear tendency amongst best teachers to see the power of the humdrum, the everyday.’ Practice Perfect, Lemov, D; Woolway E; Yezzi, K p5-6 Photo Credit used through Creative Commons
  20. 20. Practices that reflect the importance of personalised education, the power of creativity and the impact of passion in the classroom. 10 10 10 Powerful Practices Powerful Practices Curriculum & language for learning The lasting measure of good teaching is what the
  21. 21. Research bursaries – putting this research in context
  22. 22. Making feedback visible @ Patcham High School Type Frequency What does it look like? Light touch Once every 4 lessons to show that work has been seen and to identify obvious communication errors. Check the quality of presentation. Green Pen: Pick up obvious errors; check presentation; level of work.  S (x3 or 5): you have spelt the word wrong and need to re-write 3 time (if it is an unfamiliar word) or 5 times (if it is a familiar word).  P: you have missed out or used a punctuation mark incorrectly.  G: your sentence does not make sense / it has not been written correctly. Feedback Sheet Once per progress check. This is a chance for students to reflect on their progress since the last Progress Check. Either: Feedback Sheets stuck inside the front cover of the exercise book filled out. or: Feedback Stamp used FFT (Feed forward time) After an assessment, at least once per progress check. This allows students time to engage with your feedback. Students will have responded to comments or made corrections / redrafted. Identify these by using Progress Purple pens / highlighter / stickers. Verbal marking On-going. This form of feedback should be a feature of every lesson. An abbreviation to show that assessment took place or feedback was given during the lesson. Student marking in Red pen. • VF: verbal feedback - green stamp • PA: peer assessment • SA: self- assessment • LM: ‘live’ whole class marking • TA: target achieved • I: independent work Learning Goal sheets accessible to students – front cover of exercise book. All feedback by teachers in green. All feedback by students in red. Progress Purple identifies Feed Forward Time Feedback effect size = 0.73
  23. 23. Making feedback visible @ Patcham High School Type Frequency What does it look like? Light touch Once every 4 lessons to show that work has been seen and to identify obvious communication errors. Check the quality of presentation. Green Pen: Pick up obvious errors; check presentation; level of work.  S (x3 or 5): you have spelt the word wrong and need to re-write 3 time (if it is an unfamiliar word) or 5 times (if it is a familiar word).  P: you have missed out or used a punctuation mark incorrectly.  G: your sentence does not make sense / it has not been written correctly. Feedback Sheet Once per progress check. This is a chance for students to reflect on their progress since the last Progress Check. Either: Feedback Sheets stuck inside the front cover of the exercise book filled out. or: Feedback Stamp used FFT (Feed forward time) After an assessment, at least once per progress check. This allows students time to engage with your feedback. Students will have responded to comments or made corrections / redrafted. Identify these by using Progress Purple pens / highlighter / stickers. Verbal marking On-going. This form of feedback should be a feature of every lesson. An abbreviation to show that assessment took place or feedback was given during the lesson. Student marking in Red pen. • VF: verbal feedback - green stamp • PA: peer assessment • SA: self- assessment • LM: ‘live’ whole class marking • TA: target achieved • I: independent work Learning Goal sheets accessible to students – front cover of exercise book. All feedback by teachers in green. All feedback by students in red. Progress Purple identifies Feed Forward Time Feedback effect size = 0.73 Teachers / Departments
  24. 24. Do we encourage young people to make mistakes? How could we be better?
  25. 25. Holy Grail v Tool Shed
  26. 26. It’s not about pens, but about the process
  27. 27. Ralph was not harmed in the making of this policy
  28. 28. Teachers need to be guerrillas.
  29. 29. Planning for feedback
  30. 30. Digital exercise books
  31. 31. Teachers will wait for permission
  32. 32. Trusting teachers
  33. 33. http://bit.ly/1ugDLlr
  34. 34. The late, great Dicky Fox.
  35. 35. Real Learning for the real world @daviderogers

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