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Eyjafjallajökull Icelandic Eruption 2010

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Eyjafjallajökull Icelandic Eruption 2010

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A case study on the Eyjafjallajökull Icelandic Eruption of 2010. Suitable for GCSE, AS Level, A Level Geography and beyond. Complete with stunning images.

A case study on the Eyjafjallajökull Icelandic Eruption of 2010. Suitable for GCSE, AS Level, A Level Geography and beyond. Complete with stunning images.

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Eyjafjallajökull Icelandic Eruption 2010

  1. 1. Eyjafjallajökull Case Study
  2. 2. About the Volcano... • Eyjafjallajökull is the name of the glacier that sits on top of the volcano, meaning “Island Mountain Glacier”. • The volcano is actually called Eyjafjoll. • The caldera at the top of the volcano is 2.5km wide. • The volcano is 1,666m tall.
  3. 3. Location... • The volcano is on the island of Iceland, which is part of Europe and situated immediately South of the Arctic Circle. • Iceland is located on the North American plate (Moving West) and the Eurasian plate (Moving East), creating a divergent plate boundary which move apart at 1-5cm every year. • The famous Mid-Atlantic Ridge runs through the island.
  4. 4. The Eruption... • The volcano began to erupt on the 20th of March, and the main eruption occurred on the 19th of April. • It was a fissure eruption, with the lava flow more dominant on the West side but also on the East. • An ash plume rising 11,000m into the air resulted from the eruption. • The ash was fine grained, with 24% of it under 10µm which is the same as an aerosol. • The ash was distributed by high velocity jet streams above Iceland.
  5. 5. Local Icelandic Effects... • The 150m thick ice cap melted which caused major flooding to Iceland and 700 people were evacuated. • It destroyed parts of the main Route 1 road. Other roads were bulldozed to allow the flash flood water to reach the sea. • Fine ash silted the rivers caused blockages a year on. • The government paid to dredge rivers or allow them to flood and create a new path. • 20 farms were destroyed by the flooding and the ash.
  6. 6. Worldwide Effects... • The fine grain ash posed a problem to airplanes as it can enter engines or turn into a glassy substance due to the heat of the jet engine. • Britain had fine anticyclonic weather when the ash cloud existed meaning that winds dispersed the ash clouds better.
  7. 7. Secondary Worldwide Effects... • Airspace closed across Europe, with at least 17,000 flights a day being cancelled, with 6 flightless days. Overall 95,000 flights were cancelled. • This cost airlines more than $200 million a day and was estimated that $2 billion was lost overall. • Shares in Air Travel and Tourism Agencies dropped by 4%. Less fuel was needed and so 1.87million barrels were not in demand causing a loss of money in the oil industry. • It was estimated that London lost £102 million of tourist income which caused a knock on effect for workers travelling and businesses.
  8. 8. Management... • Iceland was prepared for this eruption because the first small eruption occurred on the 20th March and they were prepared for larger eruptions. • High tech equipment was used to predict the further eruptions. • Iceland had a good warning system with texts being sent to residents with a 30 minute warning. • The emergency services were well prepared.

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