The Journal, Leadership and Research topics

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The Journal, Leadership and Research topics

  1. 1. The journal, leadership and research topics OEEDU 6002 Expeditioning - Week 8
  2. 2. Why a journal?
  3. 3. Humans are storytellers who, individually and socially, lead storied lives.
  4. 4. Story is concerned with one’s place in the world and understanding of that place.
  5. 5. Every interpretation of reality is based on a unique position.
  6. 6. • You may lead or plan one someday.
  7. 7. • You may lead or plan one someday. • Gather really cool data to reflect on.
  8. 8. • You may lead or plan one someday. • Gather really cool data to reflect on. • Teachers and learners are storytellers and characters in their own and other's stories.
  9. 9. • Not merely a flow of impressions The journal
  10. 10. • Not merely a flow of impressions • Records impressions set in context The journal
  11. 11. • Not merely a flow of impressions • Records impressions set in context • A tool for analysis and reflection The journal
  12. 12. • Not merely a flow of impressions • Records impressions set in context • A tool for analysis and reflection • Objective and subjective The journal
  13. 13. • Not merely a flow of impressions • Records impressions set in context • A tool for analysis and reflection • Objective and subjective • A dialogue with oneself over time The journal
  14. 14. Logs, diaries & journals
  15. 15. Logs are factual
  16. 16. Diaries usually more personal (interpretive)
  17. 17. • Journals are a blend of logs and diaries • include the structure of the log and; • free flowing meanderings of the diary
  18. 18. • Journals are a blend of logs and diaries • include the structure of the log and; • free flowing meanderings of the diary • Quite a demanding document to keep
  19. 19. • What happened? • What are the facts? • What was my role? • What feelings and senses surrounded the events? • What did I do? Dialogue • What did I feel about what I did?
  20. 20. Maintains a dialogue • What happened? between and among • What are the facts? various dimensions of • What was my role? experience • What feelings and senses surrounded the events? • What did I do? Dialogue • What did I feel about what I did?
  21. 21. Maintains a dialogue • What happened? between and among • What are the facts? various dimensions of experience Dialogue
  22. 22. Maintains a dialogue • What happened? between and among • What are the facts? various dimensions of • What was my role? experience Dialogue
  23. 23. Maintains a dialogue • What happened? between and among • What are the facts? various dimensions of • What was my role? experience • What feelings and senses surrounded the events? Dialogue
  24. 24. Maintains a dialogue • What happened? between and among • What are the facts? various dimensions of • What was my role? experience • What feelings and senses surrounded the events? • What did I do? Dialogue
  25. 25. Maintains a dialogue • What happened? between and among • What are the facts? various dimensions of • What was my role? experience • What feelings and senses surrounded the events? • What did I do? Dialogue • What did I feel about what I did?
  26. 26. Subjective
  27. 27. Subjective Dialogue traverses back and forth between objective and subjective views
  28. 28. Subjective Dialogue traverses back and forth between objective and subjective views Objective
  29. 29. Subjective
  30. 30. Subjective We become increasingly more accepting and perhaps less judgmental.
  31. 31. Subjective We become increasingly more accepting and perhaps less judgmental. Objective
  32. 32. • Journal writing is cyclical
  33. 33. • Journal writing is cyclical • First, reflect on experiences
  34. 34. • Journal writing is cyclical • First, reflect on experiences • Then, reflect on the journal entries themselves later on.
  35. 35. • We can become more sensitive observers.
  36. 36. • We can become more sensitive observers. • More penetrating into our inquiry as to ‘what it all means’.
  37. 37. • We can become more sensitive observers. • More penetrating into our inquiry as to ‘what it all means’. • More focussed on our roles and directions
  38. 38. Observe
  39. 39. Observe Reflect
  40. 40. Observe Reflect Analyse
  41. 41. • What are you experiencing? • What is the meaning and significance of the experience? Consider
  42. 42. describe your observations e.g. signs, interactions, conditions, emotions, actions, your perceptions and feelings. Observe
  43. 43. Think about what you observe and ask questions: • What does this mean? • Why is this happening? • What patterns are there? Reflect
  44. 44. Set a task to reflect on for a day e.g. something that is happening in the community, in your connection with nature, with yourself. Write down your thoughts in your journal then answer the points under reflect. Reflect
  45. 45. Look for possible explanations and try out your ideas. Try discussing with other people. Analyse
  46. 46. Leadership
  47. 47. What makes a good outdoor leader?
  48. 48. • In two groups, come up with the key competencies of outdoor leaders
  49. 49. A competent leader is a combination of: skill, attitude, knowledge, behaviour, confidence and experience.
  50. 50. Remember these? • Autocratic: • Democratic: • Abdicratic:
  51. 51. Remember these? • Autocratic: telling / selling • Democratic: • Abdicratic:
  52. 52. Remember these? • Autocratic: telling / selling • Democratic: testing or consulting • Abdicratic:
  53. 53. Remember these? • Autocratic: telling / selling • Democratic: testing or consulting • Abdicratic: joining or delegating
  54. 54. Evolution of facilitation
  55. 55. Evolution of facilitation 1. Experience speaks for itself: learning and doing
  56. 56. Evolution of facilitation 1. Experience speaks for itself: learning and doing 2. Speaking for the experience-learning by telling
  57. 57. Evolution of facilitation 1. Experience speaks for itself: learning and doing 2. Speaking for the experience-learning by telling 3. Debriefing the experience-learning through reflection
  58. 58. Evolution of facilitation 1. Experience speaks for itself: learning and doing 2. Speaking for the experience-learning by telling 3. Debriefing the experience-learning through reflection 4. Directly frontloading the experience-direction with reflection
  59. 59. Evolution of facilitation 1. Experience speaks for itself: learning and doing 2. Speaking for the experience-learning by telling 3. Debriefing the experience-learning through reflection 4. Directly frontloading the experience-direction with reflection 5. Framing the experience-reinforcement with reflection
  60. 60. Evolution of facilitation 1. Experience speaks for itself: learning and doing 2. Speaking for the experience-learning by telling 3. Debriefing the experience-learning through reflection 4. Directly frontloading the experience-direction with reflection 5. Framing the experience-reinforcement with reflection 6. Indirectly frontloading the experience-redirection before reflection
  61. 61. How have we framed or front loaded the expedition?
  62. 62. Framing the expedition • Self-development • Leadership • Community development • Environmental / connections with nature
  63. 63. Educational goals • Self goals - group goals for expedition. - Identify fears, concerns. - Rank them over time • Identify everyone’s physical, psychological, emotional strength at the start. • Community focus: e.g. Food: group cooking / community establishment
  64. 64. Educational goals • Leadership - Move towards abdicratic style when possible • i.e. leader is part of the group - Use of questions to probe issues which eventuate.
  65. 65. Educational goals • Community focus - Food: group cooking / community establishment
  66. 66. Educational goals • Human / Nature relationships - solo experiences and reflection within journal - nightly reflections
  67. 67. Research topic
  68. 68. Research topic • Choose one aspect of the alpine environment to research. • Devise a creative method of delivering the information to the rest of the group. • The session is to be delivered during the expedition.
  69. 69. Research topic • Some possible topics are; - ecological history, early European/indigenous history, flora/fauna, geology, introduced species, history of the Alpine National Park. • Facilitate the transference of knowledge gained to the group members on leadership day.
  70. 70. The route • Which day will you lead? - create a route card for the whole day • Catering - which meal on which day? - who is to provide? - dehydrator - keep it moving around the group • Research topic - what will you choose?

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