OEEDU5003 Connecting
with Nature
Week three
Ways of seeing, ways of knowing.
Contains complex ideas.
Seeing and understanding our
relationship to nature is cultural,
historical and personal
“landscape is comprised of not on...
The
values we
see in
nature
therefore
depend
on our
capacity
to ‘see’.
Our culture and experience provides
the underlying essence or
interpretative framework we use to
make sense of what we see.
Old or
young?
Nice
flower?
clockwise = right brain
anticlockwise = left brain
Left
•uses logic,
•detail oriented,
•facts rule
•words and language,
•p...
Our shared history influences our
values and how we see nature today…
…a potted history of Australian
culture & nature in ...
• European ancestry
• Middle ages, enlightenment = shift in HNR
• Descartes (1596-1650) ‘I think therefore I
am’ – separat...
• Industrialisation
• Specialisation
• Urban development
• Mechanical time
• Wages - ‘the economy’
• The rise of science, ...
So today we ‘see’ nature through eyes shaped by
white anglo-saxon history, culture and
experience. Informed by science and...
Outdoor activity
gives us ‘Expert
eyes’, but also
blind us?
Nicholas Chevalier Mt Arapiles 1863
‘Sublime’
Romanticism and Luddites
In Britain, romanticism was a
reaction to industrialisation
(increasing alienation from nature
an...
Romanticism and Luddites
Romanticism = a turning back to
aesthetics and love of nature. (art,
poetry, literature, architec...
Poetry and art as a window in
the world.
Ye mountains! thine, O nature! Thou has fed
My lofty speculations; and in thee,
F...
Waterhouse (1849-1917)
Men as victims of nature.
Waterhouse (1849-1917)
Women as nymphs or part of nature (mythology).
How people saw
landscape?
Artist’s impressions often reflected
worldviews - ways of seeing nature.
Constable was one of the
first artists to try and
paint nature as he saw it.
"When I sit down to make a
sketch from nature...
Constable was one of the
first artists to try and
paint nature as he saw it.
An attempt at innocent eyes? –
but how nature...
European artists in Australia
– Glover - born England 1767 Paintings from
1840.
– Buvalot - born Switzland 1814 - arrived
...
Glover - born England 1767
Arrived in Aus. Age 64
Painting from 1840
Glover
Glover
Buvalot - born Switzland 1814
arrived Melbourne 1865
painting from 1866
Von Guerard 1860s
Kosciusko expedition as
scientific artist
Withers 1912
Streeton - born Australia 1867
(paintings from 1890)
Streeton
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Lect 3 - Connecting with nature - ways of seeing, ways of knowing 2013

1,003 views

Published on

Is there such a thing as innocent eyes? How do we see, and therefore know nature?

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,003
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
671
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
3
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • portrayed the might of nature compared with the efforts of humans. This was an important theme of the sublime, the aesthetic doctrine concerned with the awe-inspiring, indifferent and immeasurable vastness of creation, made manifest in the paintings of J.M.W. Turner. The new animals, the cattle, are small in the foreground while the surveying party’s camp is all but obscured under the trees
  • Wordsworth was a defining member of the English Romantic Movement. Like other Romantics, Wordsworth’s personality and poetry were deeply influenced by his love of nature, especially by the sights and scenes of the Lake Country, in which he spent most of his mature life
  • Lect 3 - Connecting with nature - ways of seeing, ways of knowing 2013

    1. 1. OEEDU5003 Connecting with Nature Week three Ways of seeing, ways of knowing.
    2. 2. Contains complex ideas.
    3. 3. Seeing and understanding our relationship to nature is cultural, historical and personal “landscape is comprised of not only what lies before our eyes but what lies within our heads.” (Meinig, 1979)
    4. 4. The values we see in nature therefore depend on our capacity to ‘see’.
    5. 5. Our culture and experience provides the underlying essence or interpretative framework we use to make sense of what we see.
    6. 6. Old or young?
    7. 7. Nice flower?
    8. 8. clockwise = right brain anticlockwise = left brain Left •uses logic, •detail oriented, •facts rule •words and language, •present and past, •math and science, •can comprehend, •acknowledges •order/pattern perception, •knows object name, •reality based, •forms strategies, •practical, •safe Right •uses feeling, •"big picture" oriented •imagination rules, •philosophy & religion, •can "get it" (i.e. meaning), •believes, •appreciates, •spatial perception, •knows object function, •fantasy based, •presents possibilities, •impetuous, •risk taking Clockwise or Anti-Clockwise?
    9. 9. Our shared history influences our values and how we see nature today… …a potted history of Australian culture & nature in 2 slides!!!
    10. 10. • European ancestry • Middle ages, enlightenment = shift in HNR • Descartes (1596-1650) ‘I think therefore I am’ – separation of mind and body, humans and nature. ‘Conquest of nature’ • An agricultural shift (enclosure) to urban living (industrial revolution).
    11. 11. • Industrialisation • Specialisation • Urban development • Mechanical time • Wages - ‘the economy’ • The rise of science, the fall of mystery • Separation of church, state and science • Darwinism (Neanderthal,1856) • The birth of consumerism/ advertising & work to for ‘better lives’ (reduce hrs of work to reduce consumption growth)
    12. 12. So today we ‘see’ nature through eyes shaped by white anglo-saxon history, culture and experience. Informed by science and moderated by urban living.
    13. 13. Outdoor activity gives us ‘Expert eyes’, but also blind us?
    14. 14. Nicholas Chevalier Mt Arapiles 1863 ‘Sublime’
    15. 15. Romanticism and Luddites In Britain, romanticism was a reaction to industrialisation (increasing alienation from nature and the slow death of subsistence community based enterprise).
    16. 16. Romanticism and Luddites Romanticism = a turning back to aesthetics and love of nature. (art, poetry, literature, architecture.) The sublime.
    17. 17. Poetry and art as a window in the world. Ye mountains! thine, O nature! Thou has fed My lofty speculations; and in thee, For this uneasy heart of ours, I find A never-failing principle of joy And purest passion. Wordsworth 1797 Lyrical Ballads
    18. 18. Waterhouse (1849-1917) Men as victims of nature.
    19. 19. Waterhouse (1849-1917) Women as nymphs or part of nature (mythology).
    20. 20. How people saw landscape? Artist’s impressions often reflected worldviews - ways of seeing nature.
    21. 21. Constable was one of the first artists to try and paint nature as he saw it. "When I sit down to make a sketch from nature, the first thing I try to do is to forget that I have ever seen a picture".
    22. 22. Constable was one of the first artists to try and paint nature as he saw it. An attempt at innocent eyes? – but how nature is seen and what is attended to, is culturally mediated.
    23. 23. European artists in Australia – Glover - born England 1767 Paintings from 1840. – Buvalot - born Switzland 1814 - arrived Melbourne 1865 (painting from 1866) – Streeton - born Australia 1867 (paintings from 1890)
    24. 24. Glover - born England 1767 Arrived in Aus. Age 64 Painting from 1840
    25. 25. Glover
    26. 26. Glover
    27. 27. Buvalot - born Switzland 1814 arrived Melbourne 1865 painting from 1866
    28. 28. Von Guerard 1860s Kosciusko expedition as scientific artist
    29. 29. Withers 1912
    30. 30. Streeton - born Australia 1867 (paintings from 1890)
    31. 31. Streeton

    ×