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Genealogy Lookups 101<br />How to get started<br />as a Genlighten Lookup Provider<br />
We’re Genlighten.com<br />
We help genealogy enthusiasts<br />
Find the offline records they want<br />
Through a network of lookup providers<br />
We hope you’ll consider<br />
Becoming one of our providers<br />
And offering lookups through our site<br />
But first, you’ve probably got questions<br />
Like…<br />
What kind of lookups could I offer?<br />
 How much should I charge?<br />
What kind of money can I make?<br />
And what qualifications do I need?<br />
Let’s start with the last question first<br />
You needn’t be an expert genealogist<br />
To be an effective lookup provider<br />
You basically just need three things<br />
Access to nearby genealogical archives<br />
Familiarity with common record types<br />
And basic library research skills<br />
Beyond that, it helps if you are<br />
Detail-oriented and persistent<br />
Confident using a digital scanner <br />
Customer service-oriented<br />
And friendly!<br />
It also helps if you have<br />
Experience researching your own roots<br />
Still interested? Sound like you?<br />
Cool! Let’s tackle your other questions<br />
1) What lookups could I offer?<br />
It depends on what you have access to<br />
Start by doing your homework<br />
Find out what repositories are near you<br />
Look for county courthouses<br />
Historical societies<br />
Libraries<br />
LDS Family History Centers™<br />
And government archives<br />
Research their collections online<br />
Visit them in person<br />
Find out how much copies cost<br />
And how long it takes to get there<br />
If a nearby repository offers access to<br />
Birth, marriage or death certificates<br />
Create lookups for those records first<br />
Other possibilities for lookups include<br />
Newspaper obituaries<br />
Cemetery photos<br />
Wills and probate records<br />
Land records<br />
Church records<br />
And city directories<br />
Focus on records unique to your area<br />
And avoid ones that are already online<br />
Unless you can do them for less offline<br />
On to your next question<br />
2) How much should I charge?<br />
Start by figuring out your expenses<br />
Consider transportation costs<br />
Copying and other archive fees<br />
And Genlighten’s commission<br />15%<br />
Look at what other providers charge<br />
Maybe look at competitive services, too<br />
Charge enough so it’s worth it to you<br />
To make frequent trips to the repository<br />
Rapid lookup response time<br />
Leads to satisfied customers<br />
Which leads to more satisfied customers<br />
Finally, don’t sell yourself short<br />
Price for the unique value you offer<br />
If you’re still not sure…<br />
Just go with $10 for now<br />
You can always change your price later<br />
OK, next up… <br />
3) What kind of money can I make?<br />
Let’s look at two different providers<br />Gina<br />Kurt<br />
Gina lives near the NJ State Archives<br />
She does birth, marriage & death lookups<br />
She visits the Archives once a week<br />
It takes her 30 minutes each way<br />
She charges $12 per record<br />
And gets 8 lookup requests per week<br />
At the archives, it takes her 1.5 hours<br />
To find the records her clients asked for<br />
And make high-quality copies<br />
Back home, she scans the paper copies<br />
And tweaks the resulting digital images<br />
Then uploads them to Genlighten<br />
Considering her expenses and her time<br />
Gina makes about $25 per hour<br />
Or about $300 per month<br />
Next, consider Kurt<br />
He volunteers twice a month<br />
At his local historical society<br />
On Genlighten, Kurt offers to search<br />
The society’s record collections<br />
For a single individual<br />
Given their name and a year range<br />
He charges $25 for a successful search<br />
But only $15 if he finds nothing<br />
He gets just two requests per week<br />
So he does them after he’s done<br />
With his volunteer shift<br />
Kurt does ~$80 of lookups each time<br />
That works out to about $120 per month<br />
For roughly six hours work<br />
So… your mileage may vary<br />
But you can probably earn $20-$25/hour<br />
OK, you’ve told me what I can make<br />
So how does Genlighten make money?<br />
Our providers pay us a commission<br />15%<br />
And our clients pay a handling fee<br />10%<br />
But that’s it… no subscription/listing fees<br />Subscriptions<br />Listing Fees<br />
OK, I’m interested. How do I get started?<br />
Go to www.genlighten.com<br />
Register for the site<br />
Fill out your profile<br />
Including a nice picture<br />
Ponder what lookups to offer<br />
Then create your first lookup offering<br />
Start with a brief but specific headline<br />
Add a detailed description<br />
Describe the records you’ll look up<br />
The repository you’ll visit<br />
The process you’ll go through<br />
And your typical turnaround time<br />
Set “found” and “not found” prices<br />
Give the client specific instructions<br />
Describing the data you need from them<br />
Preview and edit as needed<br />
Click “Finalize” and you’re done!<br />
So that’s “Genealogy Lookups 101”<br />
If you have any more questions<br />
Just e-mail us… or give us a call!<br />E-mail:	 dean@genlighten.com<br />Phone:	 (888) 845-9990<br />
Thanks from the Genlighten team!<br />Justin Ball,Co-founder/CTO<br />Dean Richardson, Co-founder/CEO<br />Cynthia Richard...
Happy Lookup-ing!<br />
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Genealogy Lookups 101

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Are you interested in genealogy research as a flexible part-time job? Would you like to earn extra income by retrieving and digitizing historical documents on demand from local repositories? This fast-paced presentation shows you how.

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Genealogy Lookups 101

  1. 1. Genealogy Lookups 101<br />How to get started<br />as a Genlighten Lookup Provider<br />
  2. 2. We’re Genlighten.com<br />
  3. 3. We help genealogy enthusiasts<br />
  4. 4. Find the offline records they want<br />
  5. 5. Through a network of lookup providers<br />
  6. 6. We hope you’ll consider<br />
  7. 7. Becoming one of our providers<br />
  8. 8. And offering lookups through our site<br />
  9. 9. But first, you’ve probably got questions<br />
  10. 10. Like…<br />
  11. 11. What kind of lookups could I offer?<br />
  12. 12. How much should I charge?<br />
  13. 13. What kind of money can I make?<br />
  14. 14. And what qualifications do I need?<br />
  15. 15. Let’s start with the last question first<br />
  16. 16. You needn’t be an expert genealogist<br />
  17. 17. To be an effective lookup provider<br />
  18. 18. You basically just need three things<br />
  19. 19. Access to nearby genealogical archives<br />
  20. 20. Familiarity with common record types<br />
  21. 21. And basic library research skills<br />
  22. 22. Beyond that, it helps if you are<br />
  23. 23. Detail-oriented and persistent<br />
  24. 24. Confident using a digital scanner <br />
  25. 25. Customer service-oriented<br />
  26. 26. And friendly!<br />
  27. 27. It also helps if you have<br />
  28. 28. Experience researching your own roots<br />
  29. 29. Still interested? Sound like you?<br />
  30. 30. Cool! Let’s tackle your other questions<br />
  31. 31. 1) What lookups could I offer?<br />
  32. 32. It depends on what you have access to<br />
  33. 33. Start by doing your homework<br />
  34. 34. Find out what repositories are near you<br />
  35. 35. Look for county courthouses<br />
  36. 36. Historical societies<br />
  37. 37. Libraries<br />
  38. 38. LDS Family History Centers™<br />
  39. 39. And government archives<br />
  40. 40. Research their collections online<br />
  41. 41. Visit them in person<br />
  42. 42. Find out how much copies cost<br />
  43. 43. And how long it takes to get there<br />
  44. 44. If a nearby repository offers access to<br />
  45. 45. Birth, marriage or death certificates<br />
  46. 46. Create lookups for those records first<br />
  47. 47. Other possibilities for lookups include<br />
  48. 48. Newspaper obituaries<br />
  49. 49. Cemetery photos<br />
  50. 50. Wills and probate records<br />
  51. 51. Land records<br />
  52. 52. Church records<br />
  53. 53. And city directories<br />
  54. 54. Focus on records unique to your area<br />
  55. 55. And avoid ones that are already online<br />
  56. 56. Unless you can do them for less offline<br />
  57. 57. On to your next question<br />
  58. 58. 2) How much should I charge?<br />
  59. 59. Start by figuring out your expenses<br />
  60. 60. Consider transportation costs<br />
  61. 61. Copying and other archive fees<br />
  62. 62. And Genlighten’s commission<br />15%<br />
  63. 63. Look at what other providers charge<br />
  64. 64. Maybe look at competitive services, too<br />
  65. 65. Charge enough so it’s worth it to you<br />
  66. 66. To make frequent trips to the repository<br />
  67. 67. Rapid lookup response time<br />
  68. 68. Leads to satisfied customers<br />
  69. 69. Which leads to more satisfied customers<br />
  70. 70. Finally, don’t sell yourself short<br />
  71. 71. Price for the unique value you offer<br />
  72. 72. If you’re still not sure…<br />
  73. 73. Just go with $10 for now<br />
  74. 74. You can always change your price later<br />
  75. 75. OK, next up… <br />
  76. 76. 3) What kind of money can I make?<br />
  77. 77. Let’s look at two different providers<br />Gina<br />Kurt<br />
  78. 78. Gina lives near the NJ State Archives<br />
  79. 79. She does birth, marriage & death lookups<br />
  80. 80. She visits the Archives once a week<br />
  81. 81. It takes her 30 minutes each way<br />
  82. 82. She charges $12 per record<br />
  83. 83. And gets 8 lookup requests per week<br />
  84. 84. At the archives, it takes her 1.5 hours<br />
  85. 85. To find the records her clients asked for<br />
  86. 86. And make high-quality copies<br />
  87. 87. Back home, she scans the paper copies<br />
  88. 88. And tweaks the resulting digital images<br />
  89. 89. Then uploads them to Genlighten<br />
  90. 90. Considering her expenses and her time<br />
  91. 91. Gina makes about $25 per hour<br />
  92. 92. Or about $300 per month<br />
  93. 93. Next, consider Kurt<br />
  94. 94. He volunteers twice a month<br />
  95. 95. At his local historical society<br />
  96. 96. On Genlighten, Kurt offers to search<br />
  97. 97. The society’s record collections<br />
  98. 98. For a single individual<br />
  99. 99. Given their name and a year range<br />
  100. 100. He charges $25 for a successful search<br />
  101. 101. But only $15 if he finds nothing<br />
  102. 102. He gets just two requests per week<br />
  103. 103. So he does them after he’s done<br />
  104. 104. With his volunteer shift<br />
  105. 105. Kurt does ~$80 of lookups each time<br />
  106. 106. That works out to about $120 per month<br />
  107. 107. For roughly six hours work<br />
  108. 108. So… your mileage may vary<br />
  109. 109. But you can probably earn $20-$25/hour<br />
  110. 110. OK, you’ve told me what I can make<br />
  111. 111. So how does Genlighten make money?<br />
  112. 112. Our providers pay us a commission<br />15%<br />
  113. 113. And our clients pay a handling fee<br />10%<br />
  114. 114. But that’s it… no subscription/listing fees<br />Subscriptions<br />Listing Fees<br />
  115. 115. OK, I’m interested. How do I get started?<br />
  116. 116. Go to www.genlighten.com<br />
  117. 117. Register for the site<br />
  118. 118. Fill out your profile<br />
  119. 119. Including a nice picture<br />
  120. 120. Ponder what lookups to offer<br />
  121. 121. Then create your first lookup offering<br />
  122. 122. Start with a brief but specific headline<br />
  123. 123. Add a detailed description<br />
  124. 124. Describe the records you’ll look up<br />
  125. 125. The repository you’ll visit<br />
  126. 126. The process you’ll go through<br />
  127. 127. And your typical turnaround time<br />
  128. 128. Set “found” and “not found” prices<br />
  129. 129. Give the client specific instructions<br />
  130. 130. Describing the data you need from them<br />
  131. 131. Preview and edit as needed<br />
  132. 132. Click “Finalize” and you’re done!<br />
  133. 133. So that’s “Genealogy Lookups 101”<br />
  134. 134. If you have any more questions<br />
  135. 135. Just e-mail us… or give us a call!<br />E-mail: dean@genlighten.com<br />Phone: (888) 845-9990<br />
  136. 136. Thanks from the Genlighten team!<br />Justin Ball,Co-founder/CTO<br />Dean Richardson, Co-founder/CEO<br />Cynthia Richardson,Co-founder/Chief Lookup Officer<br />
  137. 137. Happy Lookup-ing!<br />

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