Next Night 5 Rob van Kranenburg

1,168 views

Published on

Published in: Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,168
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
21
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Next Night 5 Rob van Kranenburg

  1. 1. McLuhan: quot;(...) For the 'content' of a medium is like the juicy piece of meat carried by the burglar to distract the watch-dog of the mind.quot;Let's think about the burglar for a while. Sergio Basbaum
  2. 2. all kinds of output network the bags
  3. 3. 1964: The console to the Cray 2
  4. 4. 1964:The Cray 2 (with Seymour Cray)
  5. 5. The Mouse. Also there in 1964.
  6. 6. BACKSPACE
  7. 7. In 1964 the mouse was around, it still is. Mark Weiser: 1991: finally said: Let’s get all of this connectivity out of these computers we so unituitively interact with and get it out into the environment: “Hundreds of computers in a room could seem intimidating at first, just as hundreds of volts coursing through wires in the walls did at one time. But like the wires in the walls, these hundreds of computers will come to be invisible to common awareness. People will simply use them unconsciously to accomplish everyday tasks.” “Most important, ubiquitous computers will help overcome the problem of information overload. There is more information available at our fingertips during a walk in the woods than in any computer system, yet people find a walk among trees relaxing and computers frustrating. Machines that fit the human environment, instead of forcing humans to enter theirs, will make using a computer as refreshing as taking a walk in the woods.”
  8. 8. Where/What are we talking about In an ambient intelligent environment the users interact with displayed images and sound, move and manipulate (virtual) objects, perform actions in a way that attempts them to 'immerse' them in a simulated environment in which they get a feeling of 'presence'.
  9. 9. Where/What are we talking about
  10. 10. Where/What are we talking about
  11. 11. Threat 1: Hidden placement of tags •Integrated into cardboard boxes •Hidden in inaccessible location on product •Slipped between layers of paper •Sewn into clothing •Embedded in plastic •Printed onto product packaging •Seamlessly integrated into paper Set of Katherine Albrecht slides
  12. 12. A 6” tag is hard to hide. Alien/RAFSEC “C” tag
  13. 13. Or is it? Hidden: Sandwiched in cardboard 6” Alien/RAFSEC “C” tag inside a box
  14. 14. This tag (with a 17ft. read range) is easy to spot, right? Alien/RAFSEC “I” Tag
  15. 15. Not when “placed inside cap” – an inaccessible location on this flip-top product Alien/RAFSEC “I” tag in lid of Pantene shampoo bottle
  16. 16. Another big tag (4.5”) Alien/RAFSEC “S” Tag
  17. 17. “placed between layers of paper” Alien/RAFSEC “S” Tag in Bag
  18. 18. Tags can be sewn into clothing
  19. 19. Embedded in plastic
  20. 20. Printed onto product packaging quot;The vision is to move from the etched, solid metal antennas to the printed antennas.quot; quot;Since radio waves travel through most packaging materials, packagers...could print the antenna…inside of the box. They could laminate it inside the package, or print it on the outside and print over it.quot; – Dan Lawrence, Flint Ink
  21. 21. Tiny chips could be very hard to spot
  22. 22. And they’re getting smaller. Hitachi’s mu-chip contrasted with grains of rice
  23. 23. They can be integrated into paper Inkode’s “chipless tag”: Closeup of Inkode metal fibers embedded in paper
  24. 24. An act of dying is any transformation. End of katherine’s slides
  25. 25. ‘Ephemeralisation’ was Buckminster Fuller’s term for describing the way that a technology becomes subsumed in the society that uses it. The pencil, the gramophone, the telephone, the cd player, technology that was around when we grew up, is not technology to us, it is simply another layer of connectivity.
  26. 26. 70% of youth aged 16-25 states that the mobile phone is a very important part of their lovelife 24% uses sms to make a pass at someone, 24% to dump their lover. For 69% the mobile phone is an important instrument to tell others that you like them. (TNS NIPO, easyMobile.nl Bron: Dorpsgekken.nl, 02-16/19:25)
  27. 27. “The most profound technologies are those that disappear. They weave themselves into the fabric of everyday life until they are indistinguishable from it.” (Mark Weiser)
  28. 28. So a few assumptions
  29. 29. AI makes us more human Kate Fox: “The space age technology of mobile phones has allowed us to return to the more natural and humane communications patterns of pre-industrial society, when we lived in small, stable communities, and enjoyed frequent ‘grooming talk, with a tightly integrated social network”
  30. 30. Fear is scripted • Maartje Fliervoet • NY Blackout
  31. 31. People are information spaces We must investigate the possibility that ambient intelligence generates authentically new situations and experiences in which an analogue notion of privacy is no longer tenable. In a mediated environment – where everything is connected to everything - it is no longer clear what is being mediated, and what mediates. In an ambient environment buildings, cars and people can be defined as information spaces. What is the autonomy of the individual in such an environment? It has autonomies, not autonomy. It has privacies, not privacy.
  32. 32. “The fact is that our social future will be determined by the human qualities of the activities being mediated through hundreds of millions of programmed devices, and by our ability consciously to resonate with and thereby to recognize these qualities.” [Steve Talbott]
  33. 33. The boundaries of what constitutes consumer electronics and computers are getting blurred,” says Gerard J. Kleisterlee, chief executive of Royal Philips Electronics, “As we get wireless networking in the home, everything starts to talk to everything.”
  34. 34. “Dear mr. Schechner, My name is Mark van Doorn and I work as a scientific researcher at Philips Research in the Netherlands. In particular I do computer science research in a field known as Ambient Intelligence. Ambient Intelligence (AmI) is a vision on the future of consumer electronics that refers to the presence of a digital environment that is sensitive, adaptive and responsive to the presence of people. The goal of AmI is to make people perform their daily tasks better by supporting them with interactive media applications. To give an example, when a child picks up his toothbrush, a cartoon could be projected in a bathroom mirror that invites him to brush his teeth for two minutes.  In our approach, we view AmI as a personal story that emerges out of the continuous interaction that a user/actor has with what we call an 'ambient narrative' that has been written in advance by an experience designer. An ambient narrative is basically an interactive narrative that is situated in the real-world like the script of a live action role playing game but augmented with digital interactive media (somewhat like the special effects that add to the drama in a theater play or movie).
  35. 35. “Before you can augment performances with interactive media applications, you need to have an understanding of what performances are and what it means to perform. I really enjoyed reading your book quot;Performance Studies: An Introductionquot; because it gave some basic answers to these questions in an understandable manner.  I was wondering if you might know about any specific research in performance studies that investigates the role of digital media in relation to everyday rituals or performances in professional service environments (hospitals, hotels, shopping malls and so on). Understanding how to write these kinds of ambient narratives will be a multi- disciplinary exercise that requires not only knowledge of interactive media design but also interior & product design, architecture and performances in general. I can see that this understanding becomes increasingly relevant as we move into what some call an experience economy!”
  36. 36. EXAM PLE
  37. 37. Heineken has teamed up with IBM and a shipping company to test the use of a global coding standard in simplifying customs clearance for the company's beer exports.The project, called the quot;Beer Living Labquot;, will use IBM's software to track cargo container shipments of Heineken beer from Europe to the US using satellite and cellular wireless technology. The companies will also use the coding standard created by EPCglobal to track the beer cartons. The goal is to create paperless documentation through better systeminteroperability, resulting in faster deliveries and reduced costs for international trade, IBM stated.
  38. 38. The system allows the company to skip building and maintaining a large central database with huge amounts of information. Instead all data sources held by the various players in the supply chain are linked through a common interface. According to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development,about 30 different documents are associated with a single container crossing a border, which equals roughly five billion documents annually. This test is part of a project funded by the European Commission to develop information technology for electronic government services. The project aims to help reduce security concerns and tax fraud. A unified data system would allow changes in information about product sizes, weight, name, price, classification, transport requirements and volumes to be immediately transmitted along the supply chain. For example it would allow shippers to immediately know if the amount of product stacked on a pallet had changed, or give a retailer time to adjust display space.
  39. 39. GREEN LANES
  40. 40. There is no broad critical academic and activist vision. FLAIRS Special Track May 7 - 9, 2007, Key West, Florida, USA At the 2007 FLAIRS Conference (http://www.cise.ufl .edu/~ddd/FLAIRS/flairs2007/) a Special Track will be devoted to quot;AI and Ambient Entertainmentquot;: http://hmi.cs.utwente.nl/flairs07 Final Call for Papers: quot;In future Ambient Intelligence (AmI) environments we assume intelligence embedded in the environment, its objects (furniture, mobile robots) and in its virtual, sometimes visualized agents (virtual humans). These environments support the human inhabitants or visitors of these environments in their activities and interactions by perceiving them through sensors (proximity sensors, cameras, microphones, etc.). Support can be reactive but also, and more importantly, pro-active, anticipating the needs of the inhabitants and visitors. Health, recreation, sports and playing games are among these needs. Sensors in these environments can detect and interpret bodily activity and can give multimedia feedback to invite, stimulate, guide and advise on bodily activity.quot;” An ambient intelligence home environment should be attentive, aware of the user needs, but not always aim for the most efficient solution and thereby not allowing the inhabitants a possible experience. That is, the ambient intelligent home environment should sometimes act as a dance partner.”
  41. 41. An ambient intelligence home environment should be attentive, aware of the user needs, but not always aim for the most efficient solution and thereby not allowing the inhabitants a possible experience. That is, the ambient intelligent home environment should sometimes act as a dance partner. A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance partner A dance
  42. 42. But it takes two to tango
  43. 43. “Johnny Q. Consumer walks into a national chain store, picks up diapers, pays in cash. He does not walk alone.One store camera captures his face, while another network of cameras traces his stroll through the aisles. The pressure-sensitive floor panels note how he lingers and nervously shifts his feet while browsing in the diaper section. At the store's national headquarters, perhaps a thousand miles away, a machine quietly notes in Johnny's file that he may be a new father. That bit of data goes into an algorithm that a few days later cross-references birth records and finds that, indeed, Johnny has just become the proud father of twins. If you can't shop anonymously at your local retail giant, then privacy as we know it is dead. quot;The originator of the pressure-sensitive magic carpet and Doppler radar upper-body-movement detector, MIT Media Lab researcher Joe Paradisso, said his inspiration had nothing to do with consumerism.quot;I was thinking of music. I never thought about this for retail at all,quot; said Paradisso, who has designed performance spaces where footsteps trigger bass or percussive sounds and torso, head and arm movements elicit higher, quot;twinklingquot; notes.But Paradisso sees how sensitive floor tiles or carpets can provide quot;robust dataquot; for retailers. quot;Systems have to work together because they all have their weaknesses,quot; Paradisso said. In other words, given help from facial-recognition software, floor sensors would do a much better job of discreetly building a database on a particular customer.Still, just because they might have this technology, should marketers use it?” (Mark Baard, Wired)
  44. 44. Gait recognition “Visual artists Paul Kaiser, Shelley Eshkar, and Michael Girard and composer Curtis Bahn collaborated with Trisha Brown to create image and sound palettes and to define the interrelationships among movement, sound, and image. For example, when a certain pattern between dancers is recognized, digital graphics develop quot;branchesquot; that reach between the dancers to connect them. Such graphics patterns, explains Downey, have established triggers but then move and morph according to complex AI algorithms, creating abstract correlations to the movement. The movement was captured by 16 near-infrared motion-capture cameras from Motion Analysis Corp. To write the AI code, Downey created a Java-based graphical programming environment using the MIT Media Lab tool kit he's helped develop over the last six years. The program runs on a prerelease version of Mac OS X Tiger on two Mac G5s, with another Mac G5 for backup.In addition to incubating some very cool art, the ASU program aims to improve the accuracy of motion detection. The Interdisciplinary Research Environment for Motion Analysis (IREMA) integrates researchers from 10 disciplines via a five-year Research Infrastructure grant from the National Science Foundation. IREMA students have founded a company called Motion Ease to develop products for the sporting equipment and security industries, as well as for improving gait recognition, movement rehabilitation, and assistance for blindness. Motion-capture lessons learned via Motion-e likely will enhance both the quot;realquot; world and the digital realms.” Real-Time Motion-E Capture Makes Dance A Digital Art Mark David ED Online May 12, 2005
  45. 45. Nokia and gestures Wibree technology (extnsion of bluetooth) will enable a new breed of applications to emerge that will work with the mobile phone In the immediate future, Iannucci believes gestural and tactile interfaces will be the next big thing in mobile phones technology that makes the phone more intuitive to use.The next step forward, in his opinion, is speech. 'Gesture and tactile feedback are really intriguing areas and a companion to the touchscreen idea. However we think that speech-based interfaces will blossom on phones over the next few years as that technology is quite mature now.'As part of this process to bind the mobile phone ever closer to our everyday life Nokia is also working on a project called SharMe, a collaborative research project with a number of Finnish universities. This ambitious project aims to develop intelligent software that would allow the mobile to automatically record events around the user's life, including photos, sound and health readings to create a real-time journal of their life and memories requiring minimum conscious input from the user. Looking even further into the future is Nokia's recent collaboration with Cambridge University to explore the possibilities afforded by advances in nanotechnology. The move is a step away from Nokia's traditional focus on applications and towards technology creation, which Iannucci described as a real priority for the company. Mobile magician: 08 May 2007, Source: The Engineer
  46. 46. Implementing digital connecitivity in an analogue environment without a design for all the senses , without a concept of corporal literacy, leads to information overload. In a ubiquitous computing environment the new intelligence is extelligence, quot;knowledge and tools that are outside people's headsquot; (Stewart and Cohen, 1997) In a ubiquitous computing environment the user has to be not only textually and visually literate, both also have corporal literacy, that is an awareness of extelligence and a working knowledge of all the senses.
  47. 47. In an information-rich, digitally connected world, where much of the knowledge and tools that we make use of are outside our heads (our 'extelligence', see Stewart and Cohen, 1997) there will be a need to develop new communication 'senses' that allow us to manage and make use of the enormous amount of information we will be confronted by. This will lead to the development and adoption of new and different types of human-computer interfaces and different ways of communicating with technology.
  48. 48. Can you envisage a practical based research field that does consultancy for Philips and Nokia, advises local governments on public spaces, that takes full advantages of open source soft and hardware to prototype its own applications for these ambient narratives and that most of a invests ll these new everyday environments where we walk, talk and meet each other with the reasons why we do what do - love and shame, instead of fear, distrust and plain greed?
  49. 49. I can!

×