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Old Dogs & New Tricks: What's New With Perl5 This Century

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The Perl programming language has a somewhat checkered reputation. People enjoy ranting about the supposed “read-only” nature of the language, and war stories of having to maintain horrible legacy Perl codebases are a popular feature of after-hours gatherings at programming conferences around the world. But, as Bjarne Stroustrup notes, “There are only two kinds of languages: the ones people complain about and the ones nobody uses”—and Perl also enjoys a reputation as a language that gets pulled out when you need just a bit more “oomph” on the command line than you can muster up with bash, sed, awk, and friends.
The thing that most people don’t realize is that the Perl5 community, after a brief period of reduced activity in the early 2000s, has regained velocity and organization, and has produced new stable language releases (with new features!) for the last 6 years (and counting). During that period of time, the community consensus around issues such as installation management, deployment, and other best practices has undergone significant evolution. New libraries and frameworks have been introduced and have replaced older standards that you may be familiar with. (CGI.pm? No more!) As people from the Perl community have gained experience with newer languages and frameworks, they’ve brought new ideas from those systems back into the Perl fold, either adding them to the core language or to libraries available on the CPAN. The result combines all the stability from Perl’s overarching commitment to backwards compatibility with support for the newest protocols and programming paradigms.
This talk will summarize significant new features that have been added to the core language, discuss tooling options for managing Perl installations, explain the community consensus on best practices around deployments and which competing libraries to use for particular purposes, and generally get you up to speed on how the Perl5 community thinks about development in Perl in 2017.

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Old Dogs & New Tricks: What's New With Perl5 This Century

  1. 1. Old Dogs & New Tricks: What's New with Perl5 This Century John SJ Anderson ⭐ Infinity Interactive ⭐ @genehack Ohio LinuxFest 2017 ⭐ 29 September 2017
  2. 2. Disclaimer I'mma talk pretty fast. Feel free to ask questions particularly if I'm moving too quickly
  3. 3. Hi I'm John • VP Tech, Infinity Interactive • Ex-biologist • Linux • Perl tribe • Polyglot coder • Just this guy, you know? meet me!
  4. 4. I'M JUST A CAVEMAN YOUR “MODERN PERL” FRIGHTENS AND CONFUSES ME I was inspired to write this talk by a few online friends who happen to be Perl programmers -- but they're not engaged with the community, they're just using Perl to get a job done, and there's a widening gulf between what I think is reasonable and what they're doing -- so I wanted to put together sort of an info dump to bring people up to speed. this talk is going to a wide-ranging survey of what's happened in Perl in the last decade or so.
  5. 5. Perl6 was released! but this talk is about perl5, so that's the last i'm going to talk about perl6
  6. 6. but Perl6 != Perl5 but this talk is about perl5, so that's the last i'm going to talk about perl6
  7. 7. 2001 Perl 5.6
  8. 8. 2017 Perl 5.26 But we're all the way up to 5.26 now. So let's talk about that 17 year gap...
  9. 9. We had some bad years there was a rough patch
  10. 10. 5.6.0 - 22 Mar 2000 5.8.0 - 18 Jul 2002 5.10.0 - 18 Dec 2007 5.12.0 - 12 April 2010 here's the release dates for several perl versions, starting with 5.6 (latest and greatest in 2001, remember) *mention even-odd numbering convention*
  11. 11. 5.6.0 - 22 Mar 2000 5.8.0 - 18 Jul 2002 5.10.0 - 18 Dec 2007 5.12.0 - 12 April 2010 see that five year gap there? yeah, those were not great times.
  12. 12. 5.6.0 - 22 Mar 2000 5.8.0 - 18 Jul 2002 5.10.0 - 18 Dec 2007 5.12.0 - 12 April 2010 but, starting with 5.10, which sort of brought perl 5 back to life, and then particularly, since 5.12, we've had this great thing! ...
  13. 13. Regular release cycle a regular, predictable release cycle!
  14. 14. 5.12.0 - 12 April 2010 5.14.0 - 14 May 2011 5.16.0 - 20 May 2012 5.18.0 - 18 May 2013 5.20.0 - 27 May 2014 5.22.0 - 01 Jun 2015 5.24.0 - 09 May 2016 5.26.0 - 30 May 2017 here are all the releases since 5.12. notice anything?
  15. 15. 5.12.0 - 12 April 2010 5.14.0 - 14 May 2011 5.16.0 - 20 May 2012 5.18.0 - 18 May 2013 5.20.0 - 27 May 2014 5.22.0 - 01 Jun 2015 5.24.0 - 09 May 2016 5.26.0 - 30 May 2017 see those nice regular predictable releases, happening every year like clockwork? that's pretty cool. underlying this is a regular series of dev releases (those are in odd numbered versions, e.g. 5.23 is the series of dev releases between 5.22 and 5.24), which happen on a monthly cycle
  16. 16. Perl5 pumpking credit for starting and more importantly continuing this goes to a couple of p5 pumpkings, which is what we call the person who is in charge of the Perl5 effort -- our Benevolent Dictator for the Moment, if you will
  17. 17. 5.12.0 - 12 April 2010 5.14.0 - 14 May 2011 5.16.0 - 20 May 2012 5.18.0 - 18 May 2013 5.20.0 - 27 May 2014 5.22.0 - 01 Jun 2015 5.24.0 - 09 May 2016 5.26.0 - 30 May 2017 Jesse Rik Sawyer there were three pumpkings involved in this, Jesse Vincent for 5.12 and 5.14, and then Rik Signes for 5.16 thru 5.24, then Sawyer X for 5.26 (which just came out a few months ago)
  18. 18. Regular release cycle getting back onto a regular predictable release cycle has arguably been the single greatest factor keeping Perl5 relevant and catalyzing the Perl "Renaissance" you may be hearing about
  19. 19. ❤ Jesse ❤ Rik ❤ Sawyer much respect to Jesse, Rik, and Sawyer for the work involved in this, it was *not* a trivial undertaking to start or to keep going.
  20. 20. ❤ Sawyer this is also a good time to mention that Rik retired from the pumpking role after releasing 5.24.0, and our new pumpking is Sawyer. Sawyer is great and as you can see from this picture, he *really* loves hugs, so be sure to give him one when you see him at a conference.
  21. 21. Modern Perl modernperlbooks.com Another catalyst for the Perl Renaissance is the book "Modern Perl", written by chromatic. He has made this freely available online; you can also purchase a paper copy if that's how you roll.
  22. 22. ❤ chromatic modernperlbooks.com Writing this book was a tremendous effort and it's an absolutely essential read if you want to understand what we call "Modern Perl", or how we do Perl in the 21st century.
  23. 23. Many language improvements One of the main benefits of the regular release cycle has been a number of language improvements. I'm only going to talk about a few today, but you can always read the 'perldeltas', or change summaries that come out with each new release.
  24. 24. Unicode support! In 2001, the world of Perl 5.6, Unicode existed but wasn't very well understood or very widely used. Today, of course, we live in a Unicode world, and it's something all programmers and languages have to deal with. It's kinda too complicated to get into here, so I'm just going to say that now we can get _really_ expressive in our Perl code
  25. 25. $code = "😀"; So it's much easier to tell if we're happy...
  26. 26. $code = "💩"; ... or when things aren't going quite as well.
  27. 27. false values: 0, '', ( ), undef everything else is true undefined values: undef everything else is defined Quick Perl background Before I can explain this next one, I need to do a brief refresher on a couple of aspects of Perl. Perl has the usual notion of true/false. These four values are false; everything else is true. 'undef' is a special value; it's what Perl gives to a newly declared but uninitialized variable. That means there's this additional dimension of defined/undefined we have to deal with
  28. 28. Boolean operators (or, and) look at truthiness. Many times, only invalid value for something is undef. So can't look at truthiness; must look at definedness Quick Perl background Now, Perl's Boolean operations *only* look at true/false. They don't care about defined/undefined at all, except for how undef is false. But many times, you don't end up caring about true/false, you care about def/undef
  29. 29. if ( defined($this) ) { $value = $this } else { # use default $value = $that } So that leads to writing code that looks like this... *explain code*
  30. 30. $value = defined($this) ? $this : $that The more idiomatic way of writing that code is to use the ternary operator -- this just does the same thing as the previous slide in a more compact way
  31. 31. $value = $this // $that defined-or Now that I've given you that background, now I can explain this great new feature we got in 5.10, called 'defined-or'. It let's you write that code like so. Which is pretty awesome. Defined-or was my favorite new perl feature of the 2000s
  32. 32. $this //= 'default' # much like this, but… $this ||= 'default' defined-or You can also combine this with assignment, in much the same way you can say ||= for 'or equals'
  33. 33. my $copy = $orig; $copy =~ s/swap/stuff/; Regular expressions are a big part of Perl programming, including substitution style regexps. If you want to apply a substitution to a variable but _not_ change your original value, you need to do something like this - make a copy, then do the sub on the copy
  34. 34. (my $copy = $orig) =~ s/swap/stuff/; and this is just a more idiomatic way to do the same thing.
  35. 35. (my $copy = $orig) =~ s/swap/stuff/; this makes the copy (and the parens are *required*)...
  36. 36. (my $copy = $orig) =~ s/swap/stuff/; and then this applies the sub to the result of the left hand side, which means $copy gets changed and $orig is left unchanged
  37. 37. my $copy = $orig =~ s/swap/stuff/r; non-destructive s/// new in 5.14, we have a new way do this. don't need the parens. the key here is ...
  38. 38. my $copy = $orig =~ s/swap/stuff/r; non-destructive s/// this 'r' modifier to the regexp, which makes
  39. 39. my $copy = $orig =~ s/swap/stuff/r; non-destructive s/// this part return the result of applying the sub to $orig (hence, 'r' - for return)
  40. 40. my $copy = $orig =~ s/swap/stuff/r; non-destructive s/// and then we just assign that to $copy. Again, new as of 5.15
  41. 41. double diamond <<>> We also got something called the 'double diamond' operator in 5.22
  42. 42. diamond <> This is related to the classic 'diamond' operator, which is used when processing files that are passed as arguments on the command line
  43. 43. # loop over files from command line while (<>) { # do something with each line } # call like 'script.pl file1 file2 file3' using the diamond operator typically looks like this, you'll have a script with this while loop, and then call it with a bunch of files on the command line. this will loop over the lines in file1, then file2, then file3, running the loop body for each one
  44. 44. problem! <> uses 2-arg open semantics! the problem with this is <> uses 2 argument open(). why is that bad?
  45. 45. 2-arg open open(IN, '< file'); this is what we call a 2 arg open call. we're opening a file, for reading, and attaching it to a file handle called IN
  46. 46. 2-arg open open(IN, '< file'); this thing right here, in front of the file name, is how you want to open the file. this is open for reading.
  47. 47. 2-arg open open(IN, '> file'); where as this is open for writing. (and if you wrote this code and called the file handle IN, we can't be friends.) 2 arg is bad, because if 'file' is actually in a variable, and somehow that variable gets a '>' or '<' or '|' in it, unexpected things happen
  48. 48. 3-arg open open($in, '<', 'file'); this is how we write that code these days, the three argument form. here the file name is just used literally, and if it gets one of those punctuation chars in it, you'll get an error rather than a bad surprise
  49. 49. problem! <> uses 2-arg open semantics! so, the problem is <> uses the 2-arg form...
  50. 50. Means that this: script.pl '> file1' is gonna be a bad time So doing something like this will open 'file1' for writing, clobbering whatever is there.
  51. 51. whoops.
  52. 52. <<>> fixes this. again, available as of 5.22
  53. 53. subroutine signatures Finally, and I think this is maybe _the_ biggest feature this decade, we've also recently gotten support for subroutine signatures in 5.20
  54. 54. sub add { my ($one, $two) = @_; return $one + $two; } this is how you might write a simple perl function to add together two numbers. the @_ is a special variable that's used to pass in the arguments for the function.
  55. 55. sub add { my ($one, $two) = @_; return $one + $two; } This bit in the first line is called "unpacking @_", and code like this is at the top of literally almost every Perl function *EVER*
  56. 56. sub add ($one, $two) { return $one + $two; } this code does the exact same thing!
  57. 57. sub add ($one, $two) { return $one + $two; } so we don't even have to unpack @_ ourselves! you can even provide default values, validate arguments in the function signature, and all sorts of crazy stuff Who has started using subroutine signatures? They're still experimental, but hopefully will be non-experimental in 5.26
  58. 58. new tools It's not just language level features, we also have a host of new tools to make it easier to work with Perl
  59. 59. "system" perl: These days, we make a distinction between the Perl that comes with your OS
  60. 60. "system" perl: just say no and encourage people not to use it for their development projects
  61. 61. /usr/bin/perl Yes, that means good old /usr/bin/perl...
  62. 62. /usr/bin/perl is no more. Instead, we use tools to install new Perls, outside the control of the OS
  63. 63. perlbrew The first tool that was developed for this purpose is called Perlbrew
  64. 64. perlbrew.pl which you can get at perlbrew.pl
  65. 65. plenv there's also a newer option, plenv
  66. 66. https://github.com/tokuhirom/plenv its website isn't quite as snazzy as perlbrew's
  67. 67. advantages • Solves "vendor Perl lockin" issues • Install multiple Perls in your home directory • ... or elsewhere • Trivially switch from Perl version to Perl version • Able to install modules without special permissions • Easy to stay up to date with Perl development either one of these tools will give you numerous advantages over using the system perl
  68. 68. plenv > perlbrew • Less magic messing around with $PATH • Can "pin" Perl different ways: globally, per-shell, or per-directory personally, i'm using plenv these days -- the ability to easily specify a Perl version for a particular project is particularly useful to me
  69. 69. perlbrew > plenv • Kicka** website
  70. 70. speaking of installing... we also have a few new tools that make installing and managing modules easier
  71. 71. local::lib one of them is a module called local::lib
  72. 72. local::lib • Install your own copies of modules • In your $HOME (so no special permissions needed) • Can also install per-project modules • Integrates well with other tools • Not going to go into how to make it work, but the docs are great!
  73. 73. ❤ mst originally developed by matt trout, so thanks matt
  74. 74. speaking of installation tools…
  75. 75. cpanminus a/k/a cpanm We've got a new CPAN client these days, cpanminus
  76. 76. % cpan Git::Wrapper CPAN: Storable loaded ok (v2.54) Reading '/Users/genehack/.cpan/Metadata' Database was generated on Sat, 10 Oct 2015 01:17:02 GMT Running install for module 'Git::Wrapper' CPAN: LWP::UserAgent loaded ok (v6.13) Fetching with LWP: http://cpan.schatt.com/authors/id/G/GE/GENEHACK/Git-Wrapper-0.045.tar.gz CPAN: YAML loaded ok (v1.15) CPAN: Digest::SHA loaded ok (v5.95) Fetching with LWP: http://cpan.schatt.com/authors/id/G/GE/GENEHACK/CHECKSUMS CPAN: Compress::Zlib loaded ok (v2.068) Checksum for /Users/genehack/.cpan/sources/authors/id/G/GE/GENEHACK/Git-Wrapper-0.045.tar.gz ok tmp-47326 for tmp-47326: No such file or directory at /opt/plenv/versions/5.23.2/lib/perl5/5.23.2/CPAN/ Distribution .pm line 468. CPAN: File::Temp loaded ok (v0.2304) CPAN: CPAN::Meta::Requirements loaded ok (v2.133) CPAN: Parse::CPAN::Meta loaded ok (v1.4417) CPAN: CPAN::Meta loaded ok (v2.150005) CPAN: Module::CoreList loaded ok (v5.20150820) Configuring G/GE/GENEHACK/Git-Wrapper-0.045.tar.gz with Makefile.PL Locating bin:git... found at /opt/git/bin/git. Checking if your kit is complete... Looks good Generating a Unix-style Makefile Writing Makefile for Git::Wrapper Writing MYMETA.yml and MYMETA.json this is the output from using the default 'cpan' client to install something.
  77. 77. GENEHACK/Git-Wrapper-0.045.tar.gz [17/1516] /opt/plenv/versions/5.23.2/bin/perl5.23.2 Makefile.PL -- OK Running make for G/GE/GENEHACK/Git-Wrapper-0.045.tar.gz cp lib/Git/Wrapper/File/RawModification.pm blib/lib/Git/Wrapper/File/RawModification.pm cp lib/Git/Wrapper.pm blib/lib/Git/Wrapper.pm cp lib/Git/Wrapper/Statuses.pm blib/lib/Git/Wrapper/Statuses.pm cp lib/Git/Wrapper/Exception.pm blib/lib/Git/Wrapper/Exception.pm cp lib/Git/Wrapper/Log.pm blib/lib/Git/Wrapper/Log.pm cp lib/Git/Wrapper/Status.pm blib/lib/Git/Wrapper/Status.pm Manifying 6 pod documents GENEHACK/Git-Wrapper-0.045.tar.gz /usr/bin/make -- OK Running make test PERL_DL_NONLAZY=1 "/opt/plenv/versions/5.23.2/bin/perl5.23.2" "-MExtUtils::Command::MM" "-MTest::Harness" "-e" "und ef *Test::Harness::Switches; test_harness(0, 'blib/lib', 'blib/arch')" t/*.t t/00-load.t ............... 1/6 # Testing Git::Wrapper 0.045 t/00-load.t ............... ok t/author-err.t ............ skipped: these tests are for testing by the author t/basic.t ................. # Testing git version: 2.5.2 t/basic.t ................. ok t/git_binary.t ............ ok t/parse_args.t ............ ok t/path_class.t ............ # Testing git version: 2.5.2 t/path_class.t ............ ok t/release-pod-coverage.t .. skipped: these tests are for release candidate testing t/release-pod-syntax.t .... skipped: these tests are for release candidate testing All tests successful. Files=8, Tests=67, 1 wallclock secs ( 0.04 usr 0.02 sys + 0.39 cusr 0.31 csys = 0.76 CPU) Result: PASS GENEHACK/Git-Wrapper-0.045.tar.gz and this is more of the output...
  78. 78. (still not done but I got tired of pasting.)
  79. 79. % cpanm Git::Wrapper --> Working on Git::Wrapper Fetching http://www.cpan.org/authors/id/G/GE/GENEHACK/Git-Wrapper-0.045.tar.gz ... OK Configuring Git-Wrapper-0.045 ... OK Building and testing Git-Wrapper-0.045 ... OK Successfully installed Git-Wrapper-0.045 this is the output from cpanm installing the same thing
  80. 80. % cpanm Git::Wrapper --> Working on Git::Wrapper Fetching http://www.cpan.org/authors/id/G/GE/GENEHACK/Git-Wrapper-0.045.tar.gz ... OK Configuring Git-Wrapper-0.045 ... OK Building and testing Git-Wrapper-0.045 ... OK Successfully installed Git-Wrapper-0.045 this is the output from cpanm installing the same thing
  81. 81. cpanminus a/k/a cpanm
  82. 82. carton Another tool, carton, helps manage your module dependencies in a project. Particularly useful for large projects with multiple devs
  83. 83. Like bundler but for Perl it's like ruby's bundler, but for perl modules
  84. 84. Freeze deps,so you always install same versions across dev/staging/prod
  85. 85. ❤ Miyagawa both cpanm and carton were developed by Miyagawa; many thanks to him!
  86. 86. pinto Another tool, pinto, let's you have your own private CPAN within your organization. Great if you have a number of devs working on things independently, because folks can do releases, make modules available, without having to build system packages
  87. 87. Your very own private CPAN Another tool, pinto, let's you have your own private CPAN within your organization. Great if you have a number of devs working on things independently, because folks can do releases, make modules available, without having to build system packages
  88. 88. ❤ Jeff Thalhammer pinto was developed by Jeff Thalhammer
  89. 89. speaking of stuff on CPAN… so, CPAN...
  90. 90. metacpan.org we have a whole new website for interacting with CPAN
  91. 91. search.cpan.org search.cpan.org is still around...
  92. 92. but metacpan integrates and visualizes a bunch of information in a really useful way
  93. 93. things like a syntax-highlighted source view, linking to home pages and code repos, showing test results, and the amount of activity in a project
  94. 94. https://github.com/CPAN-API/metacpan-web it's also open source, so if you can think of a way to make it better, you can
  95. 95. ❤ MetaCPAN team thanks to the whole metacpan team for all their hard work
  96. 96. Duck Duck Go we also have a new search engine here in 2016. it's cool, and it's partially written in Perl
  97. 97. Duck Duck Go !cpanm The most useful feature, though, is ability to use 'bang searches' to restrict your search to a particular site - this is how you search metacpan
  98. 98. speaking of modules... if you haven't been playing close attention to perl community goings on, there are a few new modules you may have missed
  99. 99. JSON::MaybeXS anybody doing web development these days needs to interact with JSON - using JSON::MaybeXS will make sure that you have a JSON library available, picking the best one from a number of alternatives
  100. 100. Cpanel!::JSON!::XS JSON!::XS JSON!::PP here's how the fallback works -- and if you install JSON::MaybeXS and don't have any of these installed, it will require Cpanel::JSON::XS (as long as you have a compiler to build the XS)
  101. 101. Moose Moo To get a handle on how we do OOP in Perl these days, you should look into Moose -- and then when you're ready to write some code, you'll probably be able to get away with dropping down to Moo
  102. 102. CGI.pm is gone I do have some bad news for you -- CGI.pm has been pulled out of core
  103. 103. (not really) don't worry, you can still find it on CPAN
  104. 104. Plack But the current standard for web development in Perl is Plack/PSGI. Offers a number of advantages over CGI, and is the basis for all modern Perl web frameworks
  105. 105. speaking of Perl websites… we have quite a few new websites these days, which make it easier to keep up with the current state of things
  106. 106. Perl 5 Porters mailing list summaries! In a recent development, sawyer has revived the p5p weekly email summary -- excellent if you want to keep up with what's going on with perl5 development but don't have time to follow the email list yourself
  107. 107. http://blogs.perl.org/users/sawyer_x/ and in a recent development, sawyer has revived the p5p weekly email summary -- excellent if you want to keep up with what's going on with perl5 development but don't have time to follow the email list yourself
  108. 108. http://cpanratings.perl.org/ one of the problems with cpan is there's just _so_ _much_ _stuff_ there. it can be hard to decide which one of a dozen different modules to use. cpanratings helps with this problem
  109. 109. http://cpanratings.perl.org/ you can see individual reviews, which version they're reviewing, and so on. one downside - because ratings are about a particular version, may not reflect current module state
  110. 110. https://metacpan.org/ MetaCPAN links to reviews as well as showing an average review score
  111. 111. http://cpants.cpanauthors.org/ we also have CPANTS - automated testing of some best practices around module development
  112. 112. http://cpants.cpanauthors.org/ here's what that looks like for a particular module. super useful if you're not sure you're doing things the "right" way
  113. 113. http://cpants.cpanauthors.org/author/GENEHACK can also see modules by author, which can be useful when trying to decide whether to use somebody's code
  114. 114. https://metacpan.org/ MetaCPAN links to CPANTS too
  115. 115. https://metacpan.org/ MetaCPAN links to cpantesters as well
  116. 116. % cpanm Git::Wrapper --> Working on Git::Wrapper Fetching http://www.cpan.org/authors/id/G/GE/GENEHACK/Git-Wrapper-0.045.tar.gz ... OK Configuring Git-Wrapper-0.045 ... OK Building and testing Git-Wrapper-0.045 ... OK Successfully installed Git-Wrapper-0.045
  117. 117. % cpanm Git::Wrapper --> Working on Git::Wrapper Fetching http://www.cpan.org/authors/id/G/GE/GENEHACK/Git-Wrapper-0.045.tar.gz ... OK Configuring Git-Wrapper-0.045 ... OK Building and testing Git-Wrapper-0.045 ... OK Successfully installed Git-Wrapper-0.045
  118. 118. cpantesters.org
  119. 119. STEAL. THIS.
  120. 120. STEAL. THIS. please!
  121. 121. speaking of Perl community… finally, you really should consider becoming more actively involved with the perl community, if you're working with (or even just playing with) perl
  122. 122. finally, you really should consider becoming more actively involved with the perl community, if you're working with (or even just playing with) perl
  123. 123. Conferences & Workshops & Mongers (oh my.) big conferences: YAPC, once a year (or so), in North America, Europe, Asia. Sometimes Brazil, Russia too workshops: smaller, regional. Pittsburgh, DC-Baltimore, Orlando perl mongers groups: like MasterCard, we *errywhere* you want to be
  124. 124. http://www.pm.org/groups/north_america.html finally, you really should consider becoming more actively involved with the perl community, if you're working with (or even just playing with) perl, there's probably a local perl mongers group near you
  125. 125. http://columbus.pm.org/ here's the columbus one!
  126. 126. cincy and cleveland too!
  127. 127. http://perlweekly.com/ finally, let me give a big shout out to perl weekly, which is a once a week email newsletter and website aggregating perl related news from all over the web if you're only going to pay attention to one perl thing, perl weekly is your best choice! sign up at perlweekly.com
  128. 128. thanks! thanks to the organizers for accepting my talk, thanks to all of you for attending and participating ...
  129. 129. thanks to my employer for giving me the time to write this talk and sending me here to deliver it
  130. 130. Questions? any questions? (mention feedback link)

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