2
Theory of Change: How will we address
poverty?
CARE helps
communities
achieve
long-term
reductions
in poverty
by…
Develo...
3
CARE Bangladesh Mission
CARE Bangladesh amplifies the voices of the poor
and the marginalized in ways that influence pub...
4
Women’s Empowerment-Theory of Change
CARE Bangladesh Impact Statement on the most Socially,
Economically and Politically...
5
CARE Bangladesh Strategic Directions (2007-2011)
Organizational
Relevance
More influential in
addressing the
underlying ...
Goal of the Project
35,000 targeted landless and smallholding
households mostly women in North and
Northwestern Bangladesh...
7
Bangladesh Dairy Value Chain
8
Improving Productivity and Capacity
9
Gender Analysis of the Dairy Value Chain
Main Challenges
Women and their HHs are not
organized into groups to take
advan...
Farmer & Farmer Leader
Milk Collector
Livestock Health Worker
Community Feed Seller
Vet Medicine Shopkeeper
SDCV facilitat...
11
• Women farmer leaders are successfully leading 67% of
farmer groups including mixed group
• Social acceptance has chan...
12
What we have done differently
• Strong platform of solidarity in the community. Many women has
emerged as “change agent...
13
Challenges
• Market incentives and access
• Education and capacity
• Mobility and nature of work (Women LHWs Vs
Women C...
14
Baseline captures on decision making and control
Women’s decision-making power
Ranging from decisions to work and to sp...
15
Some key research questions in the ongoing
mid term evaluation
• Do the women farmers and milk collectors feel that the...
16
Farmers and Farmer Leaders
17
Collective actions
18
Milk Collector
19
Women LHW
20
Women Feed/fodder seller
21
THANK YOU
Care bangladesh 05.11.10
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Care bangladesh 05.11.10

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Care bangladesh 05.11.10

  1. 1. 2 Theory of Change: How will we address poverty? CARE helps communities achieve long-term reductions in poverty by… Developing human capacity & providing economic opportunity addressing social injustice & inequity With a focus on marginalized women & girls Demonstrating a long-term commitment to the community Addressing all three components of the Unifying Framework leveraging our areas of expertise, informed by our deep understanding of community needs Measuring impact and advocating for policy change Addressing basic human conditions through sectoral interventions Addressing power imbalances resulting from • Poor governance • Gender inequities • Discrimination • Social and economic exclusion Understanding that women and girls are the most vulnerable, with the strongest impact on whole communities’ well- being Acknowledging that working with men and boys will be crucial to our ongoing work = x x
  2. 2. 3 CARE Bangladesh Mission CARE Bangladesh amplifies the voices of the poor and the marginalized in ways that influence public opinion, development practice, and policy at all levels. This happens as knowledge drawn from our grass roots and global experience is channeled through purposeful relationships with civil society, government, and the private sector.
  3. 3. 4 Women’s Empowerment-Theory of Change CARE Bangladesh Impact Statement on the most Socially, Economically and Politically Marginalized Women Women will be empowered by: Exercise of greater choice in decisions affecting their lives Reduced violence against women Strong Social movements built on women's solidarity and participation of men + X
  4. 4. 5 CARE Bangladesh Strategic Directions (2007-2011) Organizational Relevance More influential in addressing the underlying causes of poverty, more legitimate in the eyes of local civil society, more accountable to communities & more flexible & competitive in a maturing NGO market. Economic Empowerment Improved access to dignified employment for the poorest and most marginalized, especially women; markets for their products; information & services for their economic activities; and technical support for their entrepreneurial initiatives. Learning Culture A culture that promotes learning, knowledge sharing, and excellence in programming, enabling staff and partners to understand, demonstrate, and measure impact on the underlying causes of poverty and social exclusion
  5. 5. Goal of the Project 35,000 targeted landless and smallholding households mostly women in North and Northwestern Bangladesh have increased incomes and more sustainable livelihoods through incorporation into a strengthened milk value chain (2007-2011) Increase production by improving access to inputs, markets, and services by mobilizing groups of poor producers and input service provider Improve the milk collection system in rural and remote areas Improve the breeding/Artificial Insemination (AI) network Ensure access to quality animal health services at the producer level Improve the policy environment. Objectives of the Project
  6. 6. 7 Bangladesh Dairy Value Chain
  7. 7. 8 Improving Productivity and Capacity
  8. 8. 9 Gender Analysis of the Dairy Value Chain Main Challenges Women and their HHs are not organized into groups to take advantage of training and other information. Women and girls consume less milk in the household than their male counterparts. Women do not have decision making authority on the livestock assets especially large ruminants. Gender roles and tradition limit women’s opportunities as dairy producers, collector, processors, livestock health worker and input seller Equal opportunities for women employees are limited, and employers are often not open to hiring women Women are overburdened as housekeepers, Small Scale Producers and day labourers Equal opportunities for independent women entrepreneurs cannot be found and leveraged.
  9. 9. Farmer & Farmer Leader Milk Collector Livestock Health Worker Community Feed Seller Vet Medicine Shopkeeper SDCV facilitates women engagement as
  10. 10. 11 • Women farmer leaders are successfully leading 67% of farmer groups including mixed group • Social acceptance has changed on women role. Many are “change agents” • They provide basic animal husbandry and feeding advice to group members and the community, including men. • Women’s knowledge and opinions on animal husbandry are increasingly valued in the community. • Changed the view of women role in unprecedented entrepreneurship (Livestock Health Worker and milk collector) • Women engagement in dealing with other livestock inputs Improving Productivity and Capacity
  11. 11. 12 What we have done differently • Strong platform of solidarity in the community. Many women has emerged as “change agents”. • Introduce successful women farmer leaders and entrepreneurs as model for others • Being reflective on women barriers in the field and address those accordingly • Take positive discrimination for women (e.g. No training fees from women LHW) • Work with family member of prospective women farmer leaders and entrepreneurs for motivating and reducing the work load for them
  12. 12. 13 Challenges • Market incentives and access • Education and capacity • Mobility and nature of work (Women LHWs Vs Women Collector) • Our limitation
  13. 13. 14 Baseline captures on decision making and control Women’s decision-making power Ranging from decisions to work and to spend income from work Decisions to take loans from NGOs spending decisions Control of assets, money, decisions regarding livestock and dairy management Women’s mobility
  14. 14. 15 Some key research questions in the ongoing mid term evaluation • Do the women farmers and milk collectors feel that their status has changed in their household and in the community changed since SDVCP participation? If yes, is the change better or worse than before? Why? • Has the income of the women project participants increase? If it has, who spends the money and how? • Do the women project participants perceive that they have a better role in decision making in the home? In their community? Why do they perceive so? • Has there been any change in their confidence, movement in the market place, bargaining and marketing skills? If yes, what factors contributed to the change? • What are the main obstacles faced by these women with respect to their involvement in the dairy business and in their homes?
  15. 15. 16 Farmers and Farmer Leaders
  16. 16. 17 Collective actions
  17. 17. 18 Milk Collector
  18. 18. 19 Women LHW
  19. 19. 20 Women Feed/fodder seller
  20. 20. 21 THANK YOU

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