Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

0

Share

Download to read offline

Lol learning online pdf

Download to read offline

use of social media in learning in medicine

Related Books

Free with a 30 day trial from Scribd

See all

Related Audiobooks

Free with a 30 day trial from Scribd

See all
  • Be the first to like this

Lol learning online pdf

  1. 1. L.O.L. Learning Online Beyond #hashtags and emojis 😂 🙄 🤓 Guinevere N. Dy-Agra, MD Twitter: @gdyagra IG: @gwen.mom.md doctorgwen.com
  2. 2. Objectives: ¤  To present ways to maximize learning online via different platforms ¤  To educate the audience on how to use social media in medicine and learning ¤  To highlight twitter as means of learning (and possibly convince you to sign up!)
  3. 3. Definitions: e-learning ¤  noun: e-learning; noun: elearning ¤  learning conducted via electronic media, typically on the Internet. ¤  "successful e-learning depends on the self-motivation of individuals to study effectively"
  4. 4. Definitions: Social Media ¤  Social Media are the platforms that enable the interactive web by engaging users to participate in, comment on and create content as means of communicating with their social graph, other users and the public. Social media has the following characteristics: ¤  Encompasses wide variety of content formats including text, video, photographs, audio, PDF and PowerPoint. ¤  Allows interactions to cross one or more platforms through social sharing, email and feeds. ¤  Involves different levels of engagement by participants who can create, comment or lurk on social media networks.
  5. 5. Definitions: Social Media ¤  Facilitates enhanced speed and breadth of information dissemination. ¤  Provides for one-to-one, one-to-many and many-to-many communications. ¤  Enables communication to take place in real time or asynchronously over time.
  6. 6. Definitions: Social Media ¤  Is device indifferent. It can take place via a computer (including laptops and netbooks) tablets (including iPads, iTouch and others) and mobile phones (particularly smartphones). ¤  Extends engagement by creating real-time online events, extending online interactions offline, or augmenting  live events online. Heidi Cohen – Riverside Marketing Strategies
  7. 7. Definitions: Social Media ¤  Social media is an ever-growing and evolving collection of online tools and toys, platforms and applications that enable all of us to interact with and share information. Increasingly, it’s both the connective tissue and neural net of the Web. Ann Handley – MarketingProfs, Author with C.C. Chapman of Content Rules (Affiliate link)
  8. 8. Betty White “dabbing” at 95!
  9. 9. An average person has 4-5 social media accounts….
  10. 10. Review Social Media: A Review and Tutorial of Applications in Medicine and Health Care Francisco Jose Grajales III1 , BHK (Hons), MSc, CSEP-CEP; Samuel Sheps2 , MD, MSc, FRCPC; Kendall Ho3 , MD, FRCPC; Helen Novak-Lauscher3 , PhD; Gunther Eysenbach4 , MD MPH, FACMI 1 eHealth Strategy Office, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada 2 School of Population and Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada 3 eHealth Strategy Office, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Port Moody, BC, Canada 4 Centre for Global eHealth Innovation, Techna Institute and Institute Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, University Health Network and University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada Corresponding Author: Francisco Jose Grajales III, BHK (Hons), MSc, CSEP-CEP eHealth Strategy Office Faculty of Medicine University of British Columbia 855 West 10th Avenue Vancouver, BC, V5Z 1L7 Canada Phone: 1 7788814061 Fax: 1 7788814061 Email: cisco@franciscograjales.com Abstract Background: Social media are dynamic and interactive computer-mediated communication tools that have high penetration rates in the general population in high-income and middle-income countries. However, in medicine and health care, a large number of stakeholders (eg, clinicians, administrators, professional colleges, academic institutions, ministries of health, among others) are unaware of social media’s relevance, potential applications in their day-to-day activities, as well as the inherent risks and how these may be attenuated and mitigated. Objective: We conducted a narrative review with the aim to present case studies that illustrate how, where, and why social Grajales III et alJOURNAL OF MEDICAL INTERNET RESEARCH thesemaybeattenuatedandmitigated. Objective: We conducted a narrative review with the aim to present case studies that illustrate how, where, and why social mediaarebeingusedinthemedicalandhealthcaresectors. Methods: Usingacritical-interpretivistframework,weusedqualitativemethodstosynthesizetheimpactandillustrate,explain, andprovidecontextualknowledgeoftheapplicationsandpotentialimplementationsofsocialmediainmedicineandhealthcare. Bothtraditional(eg,peer-reviewed)andnontraditional(eg,policies,casestudies,andsocialmediacontent)sourceswereused, inadditiontoanenvironmentalscan(usingGoogleandBingWebsearches)ofresources. Results: Wereviewed,evaluated,andsynthesized76articles,44websites,and11policies/reports.Resultsandcasestudiesare presentedaccordingto10differentcategoriesofsocialmedia:(1)blogs(eg,WordPress),(2)microblogs(eg,Twitter),(3)social networking sites (eg, Facebook), (4) professional networking sites (eg, LinkedIn, Sermo), (5) thematic networking sites (eg, 23andMe),(6)wikis(eg,Wikipedia),(7)mashups(eg,HealthMap),(8)collaborativefilteringsites(eg,Digg),(9)mediasharing sites(eg,YouTube,Slideshare),andothers(eg,SecondLife).Fourrecommendationsareprovidedandexplainedforstakeholders wishingtoengagewithsocialmediawhileattenuatingrisk:(1)maintainprofessionalismatalltimes,(2)beauthentic,havefun, anddonotbeafraid,(3)askforhelp,and(4)focus,grabattention,andengage. Conclusions: The role of social media in the medical and health care sectors is far reaching, and many questions in terms of governance, ethics, professionalism, privacy, confidentiality, and information quality remain unanswered. By following the guidelinespresented,professionalshaveastartingpointtoengagewithsocialmediainasafeandethicalmanner.Futureresearch will be required to understand the synergies between social media and evidence-based practice, as well as develop institutional policiesthatbenefitpatients,clinicians,publichealthpractitioners,andindustryalike. (JMedInternetRes2014;16(2):e13) doi:10.2196/jmir.2912 JMedInternetRes2014|vol.16|iss.2|e13|p.1http://www.jmir.org/2014/2/e13/ (pagenumbernotforcitationpurposes)
  11. 11. Table 1. Categorical definitions of social media. ExampleDefinitionService type WordPress, BloggerShort for “web log”: a blog is an easy-to-publish website where bloggers (authors of blogs) post information and essays in sequential order [22]. Blog Twitter, IdentiA tiny blog service that allows networks of users to send short updates to each other in less than 140 characters. Microblogs are considered a platform for information dissemination, social networking, and real-time communica- tion [22]. Microblog Facebook, MySpaceA social networking site is an online service, platform, or site that focuses on building and visualizing social networks or social relations among people, who, for example, share interests and/or activities. A social network service essentially consists of a representation of each user (often a profile), their social links, and a variety of additional services [23]. Social networking site LinkedIn, Sermo, Asklepios, Ozmosis, Drs Hangout, Doc2Doc A professional networking site is a type of social network service that is fo- cused solely on interactions and relationships related to business or a person’s professional career [24]. Professionalnetwork- ing site Telehelp, Innocentive, 23andMe, PatientsLike- MeCureTogether Social networking sites centered on a particular theme; for example disaster response, nursing, etc. These share many aspects of, and operate as a commu- nity of practice. Thematic network- ing sites Wikipedia, FluwikiWikis are used to denote communal websites where content can be quickly and easily edited. Wikis support collaboration and information sharing; feature multimedia, such as video, slides, photographs; and allow anyone to edit or are password protected [22]. Wiki HealthMap, Google FluTrendsA website that combines data and functionality from two or more services to create a new, value-added, service [25]. Mashups Digg, DeliciousA website where information is filtered or collected according to patterns. Techniques involving collaboration among multiple agents, viewpoints, and data sources are often used. These agents engage through a variety of sites, through a process called crowdsourcing, where the crowds join forces for a common purpose [26]. Collaborative filter- ing sites SlideShare, YouTube, FlickrA hosting service that allows individuals to upload and create galleries of photos, videos, and other digital media (eg, slide presentations). The host will then store them on a server and make them either publicly or privately available. Media sharing sites Second LifeMulti-User Virtual Environments, also known as Virtual WorldsOther Results for social change [27]. For example, Paul Levy, the former President and CEO of Beth Israel Deaconess Centre in Boston, Grajales III et alJOURNAL OF MEDICAL INTERNET RESEARCH
  12. 12. Facebook •  Free social networking website •  Registered users create profiles, upload photos, and videos, send messages •  Keep in touch with friends, family and colleagues ¤  Marketplace ¤  Groups ¤  Events ¤  Pages ¤  Presence technology
  13. 13. What is Instagram? Instagram is a fun and quirky way to share your life with friends through a series of pictures. Snap a photo with your mobile phone, then choose a filter to transform the image into a memory to keep around forever. We imagine a world more connected through photos.
  14. 14. Tweet (n.) A Tweet may contain photos, videos, links and up to 140 characters of text. Tweet (v.) The act of sending a Tweet. Tweets get shown in Twitter timelines or are embedded in websites and blogs. Twitter An information network made up of 140- character messages (including photos, videos and links) from all over the world. https://support.twitter.com/articles/215585
  15. 15. Twi$er in Academic Teaching Ned Po$er Academic Liaison Using #yorksocmed
  16. 16. Twitter is a social network which allows users to exchange public messages of 140 characters or less, known as Tweets. It’s easy to tweet, via:
  17. 17. Tweets can be entirely text-based or they can contain multimedia such as images or video, and links to anything online.
  18. 18. Your tweets are seen by other Twitter users who follow you; you see the tweets of users you follow. You can quickly build up a network of peers with shared interests. There are around half a billion Twitter users worldwide. It works like this:
  19. 19. THREE Twitter MYTHS
  20. 20. 1: YOU CAN’T SAY ANYTHING IN 140 CHARACTERS. Yes you can, because Twitter is meant to be a conversation rather than a broadcast. It’s easy to ask, and answer, questions in 140 characters or less.
  21. 21. 2: IT’S JUST PEOPLE SAYING WHAT THEY HAD FOR LUNCH. No it isn’t – only celebrities really do that, because they have so many followers that meaningful dialogue isn’t really possible. For the rest of us, it’s a conversation.
  22. 22. 3: IT’S GREAT FOR RESEARCH AND BUILDING REPUTATION, BUT IT CAN’T BE USED FOR LEARING AND TEACHING.. Twitter is certainly more complicated when it comes to teaching, but the obstacles are not insurmountable and it can be extremely beneficial.
  23. 23. Tweet: your tweet is your message. 140 characters. Seen by a: your followers who happen to be online at the time and b: anyone who happens to look at your profile, and potentially c: by the followers of anyone who ReTweets it. ReTweet: if you RT someone else’s tweet, it will appear in your timeline and your followers can see it. Being ReTweeted yourself is a really good thing – it means your ideas are being exposed to new networks.
  24. 24. @reply: you can converse directly with someone by putting their username (beginning with @) into your tweet – this will ensure the tweet shows up in their ‘@ replies’. Direct Message: a DM is a private message, within the network, which only you and the recipient see.
  25. 25. Hashtag: a #hashtag is a way to bring together disparate users on the same topic, without the tweets needing to know each other already. Hashtags can also be a way to archive conversations on a theme, and discuss events or conferences. You can click on any #hashtag (for example #altmetrics) and find all recent tweets which have included it. This is the best way to tweet around a specific module (or academic topic).
  26. 26. IG vs Twitter ¤  I picture/video at a time ¤  Can’t save the image (screenshot!) ¤  Forward via Direct Message/repost app ¤  “likes” are not bookmarked ¤  No character limit ¤  You can edit the text when posted ¤  Up to 4 pics in 1 post (not limited by a square shape) ¤  Can download Images ¤  Can RT, DM ¤  “likes” are bookmarked ¤  140 character limit ¤  Cannot edit previous post (can delete)
  27. 27. Key concept s defined Who to follow? Search by @name, key word (posts, people), #hashtag
  28. 28. 1.  Stay up to date in news and literature. 2.  Share ideas and learn from others 3.  Help patients. 4.  It’s fun!
  29. 29. compared with Twitter activity previously reported for the AAGBI Annual Conference (September 2011 in Edinburgh). All tweetspostedwerecategorizedaccordingtothepersonmakingthetweetandthepurposeforwhichtheywerebeingused.The categoriesweredeterminedfromaliteraturereview. Results: Atotalof227tweetswerepostedunderthe#WSM12hashtagrepresentinga530%increaseoverthepreviouslyreported anestheticconference.SixteenpeoplejoinedtheTwitterstreambyusingthishashtag(300%increase).Excellentagreement(κ =0.924)wasseenintheclassificationoftweetsacrossthe11categories.Delegatesprimarilytweetedtocreateanddisseminate notesandlearningpoints(55%),describewhichsessionwasattended,undertakediscussions,encouragespeakers,andforsocial reasons.Inaddition,theconferenceorganizers,tradeexhibitors,speakers,andanesthetistswhodidnotattendtheconferenceall contributedtotheTwitterstream.Thecombinedtotalnumberoffollowersofthosewhoactivelytweetedrepresentedapotential audienceof3603people. Conclusions: ThisreportdemonstratesanincreaseinuptakeandgrowthintheuseofTwitteratananestheticconferenceand thereviewillustratestheopportunitiesandbenefitsformedicaleducationinthefuture. JMedInternetRes2012|vol.14|iss.6|e176|p.1http://www.jmir.org/2012/6/e176/
  30. 30. CONNECT. LEARN. EDUCATE. GROW.
  31. 31. Original Paper Maintaining a Twitter Feed to Advance an Internal Medicine Residency Program’s Educational Mission Paul A Bergl1 , MD; Akhil Narang2 , MD; Vineet M Arora3 , MD, MAPP 1 General Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI, United States 2 Fellow in Cardiology, Department of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, United States 3 Section of General Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, United States Corresponding Author: Paul A Bergl, MD General Internal Medicine Department of Medicine Medical College of Wisconsin Clinical Cancer Center, 5th floor 9200 W Wisconsin Avenue Milwaukee, WI, 53226 United States Phone: 1 414 805 0825 Fax: 1 414 805 0855 Email: pbergl@mcw.edu Abstract Background: Residency programs face many challenges in educating learners. The millennial generation’s learning preferences also force us to reconsider how to reach physicians in training. Social media is emerging as a viable tool for advancing curricula in graduate medical education. Objective: The authors sought to understand how social media enhances a residency program’s educational mission. Methods: While chief residents in the 2013-2014 academic year, two of the authors (PB, AN) maintained a Twitter feed for their academic internal medicine residency program. Participants included the chief residents and categorical internal medicine house staff. Bergl et alJMIR MEDICAL EDUCATION Paul A Bergl1 , MD; Akhil Narang2 , MD; Vineet M Arora3 , MD, MAPP 1 General Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI, United States 2 Fellow in Cardiology, Department of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, United States 3 Section of General Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, United States Corresponding Author: Paul A Bergl, MD General Internal Medicine Department of Medicine Medical College of Wisconsin Clinical Cancer Center, 5th floor 9200 W Wisconsin Avenue Milwaukee, WI, 53226 United States Phone: 1 414 805 0825 Fax: 1 414 805 0855 Email: pbergl@mcw.edu Abstract Background: Residency programs face many challenges in educating learners. The millennial generation’s learning preferences also force us to reconsider how to reach physicians in training. Social media is emerging as a viable tool for advancing curricula in graduate medical education. Objective: The authors sought to understand how social media enhances a residency program’s educational mission. Methods: While chief residents in the 2013-2014 academic year, two of the authors (PB, AN) maintained a Twitter feed for their academic internal medicine residency program. Participants included the chief residents and categorical internal medicine house staff. Results: At the year’s end, the authors surveyed residents about uses and attitudes toward this initiative. Residents generally found the chief residents’ tweets informative, and most residents (42/61, 69%) agreed that Twitter enhanced their overall education in residency. Conclusions: Data from this single-site intervention corroborate that Twitter can strengthen a residency program’s educational mission. The program’s robust following on Twitter outside of the home program also suggests a need for wider adoption of social media in graduate medical education. Improved use of data analytics and dissemination of these practices to other programs would lend additional insight into social media’s role in improving residents’ educational experiences. (JMIR Medical Education 2015;1(2):e5) doi:10.2196/mededu.4434 KEYWORDS
  32. 32. Medical Emojis ? ¤  😨 Headache ¤  😞 Depression ¤  😱 Cataract ¤  😎 Post Cataract Surgery ¤  😏 Facial Palsy ¤  😁 Cavities ¤  🔥 Acidity ¤  🐖 Obesity ¤  😖 Constipation ¤  🙇 Schizophrenia ¤  🎭 Multiple Personality ¤  😴 excessive sleepiness ¤  👳 Sun Tan ¤  🍟🍔 Bad Coronaries ¤  🚬 Worst Coronaries ¤  🍻🍸Cirrhosis of Liver ¤  💔 Myocardial Infarction ¤  😫 Rectal pain ¤  😭 Watering of eyes ¤  🎶 Ringing in the ears ¤  👓 Refractive Errors ¤  🌀vertigo ¤  💀 Malnutrition ¤  🐉🐛 Worm Infestation!! ¤  💓 Palpitations ¤  💨flatulence ¤  😤 snoring
  33. 33. More medical emojis? ¤  🙈 photophobia ¤  😳 night blindness ¤  😵 bilateral blindness ¤  🐣 neonate ¤  💗 heart enlargement ¤  💘 chest pain ¤  🙆 migraine ¤  🙉 ear ache ¤  🙊 bad breath ¤  💃 euphoria ¤  😉😝😋😜 mental disorder ¤  😆😫😡 mood swings ¤  Best one.... ¤  🏃 Diarrhoea
  34. 34. Research topic!!!
  35. 35. Let’s connect!

use of social media in learning in medicine

Views

Total views

82

On Slideshare

0

From embeds

0

Number of embeds

1

Actions

Downloads

0

Shares

0

Comments

0

Likes

0

×