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Evaluating internet sites with info on how search engines work

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Evaluating internet sites with info on how search engines work

  1. 1. Evaluating Internet SitesSchool Name
  2. 2. Where do you go to doresearch?
  3. 3. Research Project • You have been asked to research Martin Luther King and type his name in Google – one of the first results is: www.martinlutherking.org • Is it a good source?
  4. 4. How dosearchengineswork? From: http://computer.howstuffworks.com/search-engine1.htm
  5. 5. How much for that Keyword? • Video - Bidding on keywords
  6. 6. Buying Keywords• How much does a keyword cost?
  7. 7. Paid resultsComputerGeneratedResults –based onkeywordsandpopularity(Pagerank)
  8. 8. Evaluating a websiteCheck for • Authority • Objectivity/Bias • Content and Accuracy • Currency
  9. 9. Check for Authority • Who is the author of the site? • What is the authority or expertise of the individual or group? • What else comes up when you type the author’s name into a search engine? • Does the source have a political or business agenda?
  10. 10. Objectivity/Bias • Check for any indication of bias • Look at the domain address: .edu educational site ~ personal web page .gov government .uk British site site .org organization or .ca Canadian site advocacy group .com commercial site
  11. 11. Objectivity/Bias • What is the purpose of the site? • Does the source have a political or business agenda? • Is there an organization sponsoring the site? • sponsored by a political, business or advocacy group? If so, what can you find out about that group?
  12. 12. Objectivity/Bias• Who is the intended audience?• Is the information free from advertising?
  13. 13. Content and Accuracy• Is the information well researched and useful for you?
  14. 14. Content and Accuracy • Can the information be verified using another source? • Is there documentation to indicate the sources of the information • Does the site provide a list of sources or a Works Cited page? • Can you locate any of the source material? How reliable is this material?
  15. 15. Content and Accuracy • Have you heard about the dangers of Dihydrogen Monoxide?
  16. 16. Content and Accuracy• Links • Are there links to other credible sites with additional information? • Does the site provide a link for emailing the author or webmaster? • Did you reach this site through a reputable link?
  17. 17. Research • You found this site on famous explorers for your history project • Is it a good source? www.allaboutexplorers.com
  18. 18. Research • You found this site for your science project • Is it a good source? www.malepregnancy.com
  19. 19. Currency • Does the site clearly state a date of creation or a date for the most recent update? • Does the information cover recent changes or advances in the field or topic you are researching?
  20. 20. Summary Some examples of authoritativeAny website you use must be sites… evaluated- check for: • Authority • Objectivity/Bias • Content and Accuracy • CurrencyUse authoritative sources (example – online encyclopedias and databases) whenever possible)

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