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The GIS Capability Maturity Model Maximize Benefits from Enterprise GIS Operations The GIS Management Institute®

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URISA Connect Webinar braodcast September 17, 2014 by Greg Babinski and Amy Esnard

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The GIS Capability Maturity Model Maximize Benefits from Enterprise GIS Operations The GIS Management Institute®

  1. 1. The GIS Capability Maturity Model Maximize Benefits from Enterprise GIS Operations The GIS Management Institute® URISA GMI Webinar 17 September 2014 Instructors Greg Babinski, GISP Amy Esnard, GISP
  2. 2. The GIS Capability Maturity Model Workshop Author: • Greg Babinski, MA, GISP, King County GIS Center Contributors: • Al Butler, GISP • Allen Ibaugh, AICP, GISP • GIS Management Institute® Committee Workshop Reviewers: • Jochen Albrecht • Savannaha Mentzer • Matt Morey 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 2
  3. 3. Does your GIS operation utilize GIS Best Practices? Please vote: Yes No 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 3
  4. 4. Introductions: • Name and job title • Name of your agency • Type of agency • Size of your agency • What percent complete is your GIS? 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 4
  5. 5. Workshop Outline 1. Context: The ongoing geospatial revolution 2. Development and purpose of the URISA GIS Capability Maturity Model: – What is a capability maturity model? – Origins of the GIS Capability Maturity Model – The URISA Geospatial Management Competency Model – Development of the URISA GIS Capability Maturity Model 3. The URISA GIS Capability Maturity Model – Hands-on, Step by Step 4. The role of the GIS CMM in the GIS Management Institute® – The role of the GIS Management Institute® in enhancing sustainable GIS – The role of the GIS Management Institute® in developing professional GIS managers – The GIS Management Institute® - next steps 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 5
  6. 6. Workshop Resources 1. URISA Geospatial Management Competency Model 2. URISA GIS Capability Maturity Model 3. URISA GIS Capability Maturity Model Glossary: http://www.urisa.org/clientuploads/director y/GMI/GISCMM_Glossary_5-8-14_Final.pdf 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 6
  7. 7. THE ONGOING GEOSPATIAL REVOLUTION Section 1: 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 7
  8. 8. The last 50 years have seen a Geospatial Revolution • Developed upon a foundation of geographic theory • Enabled by the development of computing and information technology • Built upon digital data with location attributes • Aided by allied geospatial technology • Turned into a viable business support tool by geospatial software • Move away from GIS as a standalone piece of software • Growing societal awareness of geospatial power 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 8
  9. 9. The last 50 years have seen a Geospatial Revolution • Developed upon a foundation of geographic theory • Enabled by the development of modern computers and information technology • Built upon digital data with location attributes • Aided by allied geospatial technology • Turned into a viable business support tool by geospatial software • Transformed into a successful revolution by combining all these components into geographic information system (GIS) operations • Supported by cadres of GIS professionals and managers 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 9
  10. 10. The current state of the Geospatial Revolution • Geospatial technology has been proven beyond question as a key tool for effective government administration and business processes. • Geospatial technology has become ubiquitous within private industry, agriculture, research, academics, and for use by citizens. • A growing body research proves that geospatial technology delivers significant financial return on investment. 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 10
  11. 11. The Geospatial Revolution • A key tool for government and business process… 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 11
  12. 12. The Geospatial Revolution • Within the grasp of everyone… 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 12
  13. 13. Theoretical basis for GIS cost and benefit calculations. After Prof. R. O. Zerbe The Geospatial Revolution • Delivers significant financial benefits… 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 13
  14. 14. The next 50 years of the Geospatial Revolution • Geospatial technology will benefit government, business, and society in new and unanticipated ways. • GIS will continue to provide financial benefits to those who employ it. • Small cadres of professionals within GIS operations will support large bodies of end- users. 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 14
  15. 15. King County GIS Organizational Structure, supports 35 county departments and offices, plus outside customers 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 15
  16. 16. King County GIS Center has 28 professional staff and a budget of over $5 million per year. 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 16
  17. 17. King County GIS Center support more than 4,600 discrete users 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 17
  18. 18. The next 50 years of the Geospatial Revolution • Geospatial technology will benefit government, business, and society in new and unanticipated ways. • GIS will continue to provide financial benefits to those who employ it. • Small cadres of professionals within GIS operations will support large bodies of end-users. • How can we measure the effectiveness of GIS operations? • What can we as GIS professionals do to improve the future benefits to society from GIS operations? 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 18
  19. 19. DEVELOPMENT AND PURPOSE OF THE GIS CAPABILITY MATURITY MODEL Section 2: 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 19
  20. 20. What is a Capability Maturity Model? • A tool to assess an organization’s ability to accomplish a defined task or set of tasks • Originated with the Software Engineering Institute – Objective evaluation of software contractors – SEI published Managing the Software Process 1989 – SEI CMM is process focused • Other applications of the capability maturity model concept: – System engineering – Project management – Risk management – Information technology service providers 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 20
  21. 21. Why is thinking about capability & process maturity important? 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 21
  22. 22. Why is thinking about capability & process maturity important? 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 22
  23. 23. Origins of the GIS Capability Maturity Model • Why are there variations in enterprise GIS Operations? – Unique aspect of each agency? – Level of resources provided for GIS? – Variations in our ability to use GIS resources? – Forgetting where we are in the GIS development cycle? – GIS operations with similar resources sometimes get different results! Why? 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 23
  24. 24. Origins of the GIS Capability Maturity Model • Where is your GIS on the development cycle? • How can we refocus on the GIS development cycle? 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 24
  25. 25. Origins of the GIS Capability Maturity Model • There are many ways we can focus on the GIS development cycle: – With an external focus: • Best practices • Benchmarking – With a theoretical focus: • Ideal design • Academic state of the art – With a capability focus – With a maturity level focus 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 25
  26. 26. Origins of the GIS Capability Maturity Model Originated in 2009 as a purely academic exercise: • Maturity for the proposed model indicates progression of an organization towards GIS capability that maximizes: – Potential for the use of state of the art GIS technology – Commonly recognized quality data – Organizational best practices appropriate for municipal business use • The Municipal GIS Capability Maturity Model assumes two broad areas of GIS operational development: – Enabling capability – Execution ability 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 26
  27. 27. Enabling Capability Components: What we buy or acquire for our GIS operation… Execution Ability Components: How we utilize what we have acquired for our GIS… Origins of the GIS Capability Maturity Model 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 27
  28. 28. Very Simple Questionnaire Enabling capability rating scale based on NSGIC Geospatial Maturity Assessment Scale Origins of the GIS Capability Maturity Model 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 28
  29. 29. Execution ability rating scale based on SEI CMM Origins of the GIS Capability Maturity Model Very Simple Questionnaire 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 29
  30. 30. 2009 State of Washington Survey Results Presented at URISA Annual Conference: Origins of the GIS Capability Maturity Model 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 30
  31. 31. 2009 State of Washington Survey Results Presented at URISA Annual Conference: Origins of the GIS Capability Maturity Model 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 31
  32. 32. URISA Steps In and Adopts the GIS Capability Maturity Model 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 32
  33. 33. 2010 ArcNews Article in URISA GIS Management Column Babinski’s Theory of GIS Management: As GIS Operational Maturity Improves, ROI Increases URISA Steps In 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 33
  34. 34. URISA Steps In • 2010: David DiBiase Proposes that URISA develop the Geospatial Management Competency Model (Tier 9 of the USDOLETA Geospatial Technology Competency Model) • 2011: DiBiase, Babinski & Kennelly form URISA GMCM Committee • 2011: Babinski convenes GIS Managers Task Force at Washington GIS Conference to: – Create GMCM ‘Strawman’ Draft – Review and revise the GIS Capability Maturity Model • 2011: At GIS-Pro in Indianapolis, GMCM Committee revises Strawman Draft and by early 2012 Publishes GMCM for peer-review. 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 34
  35. 35. Final Peer-Reviewed URISA GMCM:  Published in June 2012  Adopted by USDOLETA August 2012  18 Competency Clusters  74 individual competencies http://www.urisa.org/resources/geospatial-management-competency-model/ URISA Develops the Geospatial Management Competency Model for the U.S. Department of Labor 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 35
  36. 36. The ‘Ah-ha!’ moment…. GIS operational process maturity (aka the GIS Capability Maturity Model) and… GIS management capability (aka the Geospatial Management Competency Model) Can both best be defined against… A body of geospatial management best practices and standards, or a GIS Management Body of Knowledge 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 36
  37. 37. The ‘Ah-ha!’ moment (Part 2): No one has ever defined GIS management best practices 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 37
  38. 38. URISA Steps In • 2010: David DiBiase Proposes that URISA develop the Geospatial Management Competency Model (Tier 9 of the USDOLETA Geospatial Technology Competency Model) • 2011: DiBiase, Babinski & Kennelly form URISA GMCM Committee • 2011: Babinski convenes GIS Managers Task Force at Washington GIS Conference to: – Create GMCM ‘Strawman’ Draft – Review and revise the GIS Capability Maturity Model • 2011: At GIS-Pro in Indianapolis, GMCM Committee revises Strawman Draft and by early 2012 Publishes GMCM for peer-review. 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 38
  39. 39.  2011 State of Washington – GIS Managers Daylong Review Session  2012 –2013 GMI Committee Begins Review & Revision Process  2013 Peer-Review Cycle  GIS Capability Maturity Model Adopted and Published in October 2013 Developing the revised, peer-reviewed URISA GIS Capability Maturity Model 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 41
  40. 40. 2013 Revised Model Framework: Enabling Capability (EC) Component EC1. Framework GIS Data EC2. Framework GIS Data Maintenance EC3. Business GIS Data EC4. Business GIS Data Maintenance EC5. GIS Data Coordination EC6. Metadata EC7. Spatial Data Warehouse EC8. Architectural Design EC9. Technical Infrastructure EC10. Replacement Plan EC11. GIS Software Maintenance EC12. Data back-up and security EC13. GIS Application Portfolio EC14. GIS Application Portfolio Management EC15. GIS Application Portfolio O&M EC16. Professional GIS Management EC17. Professional GIS Operations Staff EC18. GIS Staff Training and Professional Development EC19. GIS Governance Structure EC20. GIS is Linked to Agency Strategic Goals EC21. GIS Budget EC22. GIS Funding EC23. GIS Financial Plan Execution Ability (EA) Component EA1. New Client Services Evaluation and Development EA2. User Support, Help Desk, and End-User Training EA3. Service Delivery Tracking and Oversight EA4. Service Quality Assurance EA5. Application Development or Procurement Methodology EA6. Project Management Methodology EA7. Quality Assurance and Quality Control EA8. GIS System Management EA9. Process Event Management EA10. Contract and Supplier Management EA11. Regional Collaboration EA12. Staff Development EA13. Operation Performance Management EA14. Individual GIS Staff Performance Management EA15. Client Satisfaction Monitoring and Assurance EA16. Resource Allocation Management EA17. GIS data sharing EA18. GIS Software License Sharing EA19. GIS data inter-operability EA20. Legal and policy affairs management EA21. Balancing minimal privacy with maximum data usage EA22. Service to the community and to the profession Developing the revised, peer-reviewed URISA GIS Capability Maturity Model 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 43
  41. 41. Section 1: The Ongoing Geospatial Revolution Section 2: Development and Purpose of the URISA GIS Capability Maturity Model Discussion:  Comments?  Questions? 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 44
  42. 42. THE URISA GIS CAPABILITY MATURITY MODEL HANDS-ON, STEP BY STEP Section 3: 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 45
  43. 43. Section 3: The URISA GIS Capability Maturity Model: • Part A - Enabling Capability • Process: • Work independently • Be objective but critical • Record your preliminary rating for your organization • Make notes • How can you validate your rating? 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 46
  44. 44. Enabling Capability Components For each question in the ‘Enabling Capability’ section, read the brief description. Check the implementation category [ ] 1.00 Fully implemented [ ] 0.80 In progress with full resources available to achieve the capability [ ] 0.60 In progress but with only partial resources available to achieve the capability [ ] 0.40 Planned and with resources available to achieve the capability [ ] 0.20 Planned but with no resources available to achieve the capability [ ] 0.00 This is desired, but is not planned [ ] Not Applicable (This is a non-numeric response that requires an explanation of why this component should not be considered in assessing the operation.) 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 47
  45. 45. EC1. Framework GIS Data Complete assessment for each data layer: a. Geodetic Control b. Cadastral c. Orthoimagery d. Elevation e. Hydrography f. Administrative Units g. Transportation Does the agency have access to adequate framework GIS data to meet its business needs? For the GISCMM, framework data corresponds to jurisdiction-wide common base layers as defined by the agency to meet its business needs. For reference, refer to the NSDI framework data layers (see http://www.fgdc.gov/framework/). See also EC2, below) EC2. Framework GIS Data Maintenance Complete assessment for each data layer: a. Geodetic Control b. Cadastral c. Orthoimagery d. Elevation e. Hydrography f. Administrative Units g. Transportation Are data stewards defined for each framework GIS data layer and the data is maintained (kept up to date) to meet business needs?  Refer to EC6 for description of the ideal data environment.  There could very likely be multiple stewards  The Enterprise GIS responsibility is that there are no gaps in coverage  In performing the assessment, every framework component should be covered 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 48
  46. 46. EC3. Business GIS Data Complete assessment for each data layer: a. Example: situs address b. Name: c. Name: d. Name: e. Name: Does the agency have access to adequate business data (non- framework GIS data) to meet its business needs?  Need for data based on agency business needs, therefore this data will vary from agency to agency; specific business data layers will not be comparable from agency to agency  Agency completing the assessment should name at least 5 but no more than 10 business data types. These business data layers should also be assessed under EC4, below. EC4. Business GIS Data Maintenance Complete assessment for each data layer: a. Example: situs address b. Name: c. Name: d. Name: e. Name: Does the agency have data stewards defined for each business GIS data layer and is the data is maintained (kept up to date) to meet business needs?  Also refer to EC3 above for business  Refer to EC7 below, for ideal data environment 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 49
  47. 47. EC5. GIS Data Coordination Is there an enterprise GIS data coordination function and/or committee to rationalize framework and business GIS data development, access, and maintenance?  This could be a function of a GIO (chief geographic information officer), a governance function, or an enterprise GIS office function, depending on desired level of formality or institutionalization. 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 50
  48. 48. EC6. Metadata Is metadata available and maintained for all framework and business data layers?  Is there a rationale for accepting any data without metadata? 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 51
  49. 49. EC7. Spatial Data Warehouse Is an enterprise spatial data infrastructure in place that includes a centralized production database environment available for GIS data stewards to compile the official version of framework and business spatial data?  Is a separate spatial data warehouse available for GIS users to access and download the official published version of the data for GIS applications?  Is there a consistent data structure and are there consistent practices for effective data maintenance, posting and processing?  Is the enterprise GIS the authoritative source of spatial data for the organization? 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 52
  50. 50. EC8. Architectural Design Does an architectural design exist that defines the current state and planned future development of the technical infrastructure? Does the architectural design guide the investment in GIS technical infrastructure?  Does the GIS Architectural design support the business architecture and all business activities, per the Zachman Framework (or similar)?  Does it align with agency IT standards and architecture?  Does the agency analyze architectural gaps and drive IT standards and architectural design criteria?  Note that architectural design(8) and Technical infrastructure (9) are interrelated 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 53
  51. 51. EC9. Technical Infrastructure Is there technical infrastructure in place to maintain and operate the GIS and to meet the agency business needs?  Meeting agency business needs should be defined against agreed performance criteria. Technical infrastructure includes hardware (servers, storage, desktops, input and output peripherals), network components, operating system, and GIS software.  Note that architectural design(8) and Technical infrastructure (9) are interrelated EC10. Replacement Plan Is there a plan in place and implemented to replace technical infrastructure components (hardware, network components, current imagery, and other procured data) that have a defined ‘end of useful life? 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 54
  52. 52. EC11. GIS Software Maintenance Is GIS software available and adequate to meet agency business needs and is it under maintenance to ensure long term support and development?  If open-source’ GIS software is used, is alternate support and development capability available and are the real costs of operation and maintenance accounted for? 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 55
  53. 53. EC12. Data back-up and security Is a computer back-up system in place to ensure the security of GIS data and applications?  Is the backup system is tested periodically by tests to restore sample data?  Is system security in place to control internal and external access to GIS data and applications as appropriate?  Is a GIS data archiving and preservation program in place? 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 56
  54. 54. EC14. GIS Application Portfolio Management Is the agency’s GIS application portfolio managed to a common design and development framework? EC15. GIS Application Portfolio O&M Is the agency’s GIS application portfolio kept viable via ongoing support and application maintenance? EC13. GIS Application Portfolio If required to meet the needs of agency GIS users/clients, is a portfolio of custom or off-the-shelf GIS or GIS enabled applications available? 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 57
  55. 55. EC16. Professional GIS Management Is the agency GIS managed by a qualified manager with appropriate education, experience, and credentials? EC17. Professional GIS Operations Staff Is the agency GIS operated and maintained by an adequate staff with appropriate professional qualifications?  For purposes of the GISCMM, adequate operational staffing is defined as meeting the ‘roles’ defined by the Geospatial Technology Competency Model – see: http://www.careeronestop.org/CompetencyModel/pyramid.as px?GEO=Y. EC18. GIS Staff Training and Professional Development Do the agency GIS manager and other professional staff have access to on-going training to maintain and develop their technical and operational knowledge, skills, and abilities? 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 58
  56. 56. EC19. GIS Governance Structure Does the agency have a formal GIS governance structure that links the GIS operation both to users and to key decision makers?  For some agencies (very small or with well-oiled enterprise GIS) a formal committee structure may not be required. A formal committee is a traditional practice, but in everyday practice, many agencies proceed without such a formal committee structure. Does the agency’s governance address:  Long-range planning  Stakeholder satisfaction  Ability for business stakeholders to leverage initiatives EC20. GIS is Linked to Agency Strategic Goals Does the GIS as it exists have a defined responsibility and a clearly defined role in supporting the strategic goals of the agency? 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 59
  57. 57. EC21. GIS Budget Does the GIS operation develop a comprehensive budget that includes (at a minimum) labor, hardware, software, data, consulting, and training costs?  This mean either a separate GIS budget or embedded budget components that the GIS manager has input on and can base planning and programs upon as the budget is expended. EC22. GIS Funding Does the GIS organization have adequate funding for (at a minimum) labor, hardware, software, data, consulting, and training costs? EC23. GIS Financial Plan Does the GIS organization have a financial plan that includes a funding model (where the money is coming from) and that also projects future episodic costs for equipment, imagery, and other data replacement? 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 60
  58. 58. Section 3: The URISA GIS Capability Maturity Model: • Part A - Enabling Capability – Process: • Take a short break – back in 10 minutes maximum • Those of you with colleagues from your own agency, now compare your initial assessments • Compare and discuss your ratings for 10 minutes: – Focus on areas of disagreement – How can you come to consensus? – What are your key deficiencies? 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 61
  59. 59. Section 3: The URISA GIS Capability Maturity Model: Part B – Execution Ability Process: – Work independently – Be objective but critical – Record your preliminary rating for your organization – Make notes – How can you validate your rating? 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 62
  60. 60. For each question in the ‘Execution Ability’ section, read the brief question and description. Check the implementation category that best describes your agency’s current status. Feel free to include any clarifying comments or questions. [ ] Level Five: Optimized processes [ ] Level Four: Managed and measured processes [ ] Level Three: Defined processes [ ] Level Two: Repeatable processes [ ] Level One: Ad-hoc processes Execution Ability Components 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 63
  61. 61. EA1. New Client Services Evaluation and Development How does the GIS operation evaluate new agency business needs for GIS services and develop plans to respond to new client service requests?  This component should include a timeline/turn-around response focus.  Are new services evaluated against the agency strategic plan?  Are new services evaluated against ROI criteria…does it make financial sense?  Level 5 – optimized process – requires looking at existing services also and evaluating them to provide optimized services. 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 64
  62. 62. EA2. User Support, Help Desk, and End-User Training How does the GIS operation support end users, including user guides, help documentation, training, and ad-hoc help-desk and/or on-site support?  This component should include a timeline/turn-around response focus  This should include a ‘train-the-trainer program. 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 65
  63. 63. EA3. Service Delivery Tracking and Oversight How does the GIS unit monitor and evaluate client service delivery? EA4. Service Quality Assurance How does the GIS operation ensure the quality of services provided to clients?  This should also recognize the quality that can be provided may be dependent upon the time available to meet the client’s needs 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 66
  64. 64. EA5. Application Development or Procurement Methodology How does the GIS operation develop custom GIS applications?  Do GIS applications align with and support business needs?  How does the GIS Operation preform requirements development and development execution strategy, including build vs. buy decision?  How does the GIS Operation manage GIS application development when in-house programming is not included within the GIS operation?  This should also recognize the quality that can be provided may be dependent upon the time available to meet the client’s needs 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 67
  65. 65. EA6. Project Management Methodology How does the GIS operation manage projects for which it is responsible?  Projects could be either executed in-house or by an outside contractor. 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 68
  66. 66. EA7. Quality Assurance and Quality Control How does the GIS operation assure a reasonable and appropriate level of quality for projects and for ongoing GIS system operation, to meet defined business needs?  System operations include database maintenance and spatial data warehouse processes.  Data is a key enterprise GIS component for effective QA/QC.  Perhaps there are several processes against which this maturity component should be applied. 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 69
  67. 67. EA8. GIS System Management How does the GIS operation manage the core GIS systems that it is responsible for?  GIS system management includes system administration, database administration, network administration, system security, data backup, security, and restore processes, etc.  If these functions are managed within the GIS Operation, there should be defined procedures/best practices. But if the functions are provided outside the GIS operation, these procedures and best practices should form the basis for well- defined service level agreements. 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 70
  68. 68. EA9. Process Event Management How does the GIS operation manage GIS system process events?  Typical process events include planned hardware and software upgrades, unplanned hardware failure and data loss and restore events.  This should include well defined change management best practices, for both routine/batch processes, and for significant system upgrades/modifications. 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 71
  69. 69. EA10. Contract and Supplier Management How does the GIS operation manage its purchasing and contracting processes to ensure the best value for the supplies and services that it acquires? 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 72
  70. 70. EA11. Regional Collaboration How does the GIS operation manage regional collaboration to ensure that opportunities to share in the development and operation of data, infrastructure, and applications are pursued, and that the agency’s GIS is leveraged to benefit other potential local partners? 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 73
  71. 71. EA12. Staff Development How does the GIS operation manage the process of hiring and developing its staff to ensure that individual staff member skills are developed appropriate to current and emerging technical and business needs?  How does the GIS operation ensure that its staff resources meet its operational requirements for individual GIS competencies, including back-up and succession planning?  A best practice would include a well-defined and effective performance management and appraisal system.  A key objective would be minimizing risk to the organization, while enhancing staff effectiveness and productivity. 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 74
  72. 72. EA13. Operation Performance Management How does the GIS operation manage performance of its operations as a whole?  This is the single key indicator of organizational process maturity and execution ability? Perhaps an organization’s rating in this area would serve as a ceiling for its overall rating. 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 75
  73. 73. EA14. Individual GIS Staff Performance Management How does the GIS operation manage individual employee staff performance? 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 76
  74. 74. EA15. Client Satisfaction Monitoring and Assurance How does the GIS operation monitor, assess, and assure the satisfaction of its clients?  Ideally, clients should be surveyed to indicate their satisfaction with individual projects and with the enterprise GIS operation as a whole. 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 77
  75. 75. EA16. Resource Allocation Management How does the GIS optimize use of its operational staff and of other resources at its disposal, both to minimize costs and to achieve maximum overall effectiveness for the enterprise?  This should include a global correlation between an organization’s resources and the services that it provides, both internal and external. 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 78
  76. 76. EA17. GIS data sharing Is GIS data sharable and is it shared? How does the GIS operation leverage shared and sharable GIS data to maintain effectiveness and minimize cost and redundant functions? 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 79
  77. 77. EA18. GIS Software License Sharing Are GIS software licenses sharable and are they shared?  How does the GIS operation leverage shared and sharable GIS software to maintain effectiveness and minimize cost and redundant services? 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 80
  78. 78. EA19. GIS data inter- operability Are agency framework and business geospatial data sources capable of being integrated and accessed in a technically appropriate and efficient manner? 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 81
  79. 79. EA20. Legal and policy affairs management Are the GIS organization’s activities conducted to comply with appropriate legal and policy guidelines and requirements?  Does the GIS organization promote appropriate changes to the legal and policy framework to support effective enterprise GIS operations? 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 82
  80. 80. EA21. Balancing minimal privacy with maximum data usage Does the GIS operation adhere to open data sharing principles to the maximum potential while minimizing administrative hurdles and roadblocks?  Does the GIS operation apply the maximum care to ensure the security of the minimum domain of restricted confidential data? 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 83
  81. 81. EA22. Service to the community and to the profession Does the GIS operation support the GIS Certification Institute‘s and the URISA GIS Code of Ethics ‘Contributions to the Profession’ guidelines?  Does the GIS operation support and encourage efforts by its staff members for appropriate professional outreach, educational, and community service activities related to GIS? 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 84
  82. 82. Section 3: The URISA GIS Capability Maturity Model: Part B – Execution Ability Process: – Reconvene and compare and discuss your ratings for 15 minutes: • Focus on areas of disagreement • How can you come to consensus? • What are your key deficiencies? 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 85
  83. 83. Section 3: The URISA GIS Capability Maturity Model: General Comments and Discussion 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 86
  84. 84. THE ROLE OF THE GIS CMM IN THE GIS MANAGEMENT INSTITUTE® Section 4: 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 87
  85. 85. Improving future benefits from geospatial technology: The GIS Management Institute • URISA GIS Management Institute® • GMI Goal: • The GIS Management Institute® helps organizations identify and implement enterprise GIS management practice improvements. • GIS managers, anywhere in the world, will increase return on investment and maximize the effective use of GIS for their enterprise business goals with GMI products and services. • URISA Received GIS Management Institute Charter from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office in 2013. 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 88
  86. 86. URISA GIS Management Institute® Business Need: • GIS professionals and practitioners invest considerable time and money for their initial education and continual training, yet recognized professional practice standards and guidelines are lacking in the GIS profession. • Public agencies and private entities have invested very large sums of money to develop and operate their enterprise GIS and program specific GIS operations, yet best-practices and investment validation for GIS operations are both lacking. • Worldwide, most GIS managers, professionals, and practitioners continue to deliver value to society through the work that they do. • But there remains a need for an environment where best practices and professional standards can be developed, validated, and promoted to maximize the value and effectiveness of GIS operations. • These are the needs that the GIS Management Institute® will meet. 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 89
  87. 87. URISA GIS Management Institute® GMI Core Products and Services: • The GIS Management Institute® already has two key products that are central to its core strategy: • The Geospatial Management Competency Model (GMCM) for managers • The GIS Capability Maturity Model. (GISCMM) for GIS organizations • The GIS Management Body of Knowledge (GMBOK) will be a third key product of the GMI. • In addition a GMI Glossary has been developed to support GMI services. 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 90
  88. 88. URISA GIS Management Institute® GMI Core Products and Services: • The GISCMM and the GMBOK will also be used to develop an on- line subscription based organizational assessment and accreditation service for enterprise GIS operations anywhere in the world. • Subscribers to the service will populate the GMI database with metrics on their own GIS configuration, maturity assessment, and performance metrics. • Their subscription will then provide them access to the GMI database to analyze the effectiveness of individual GIS management best practices and to compare their GIS operations against peer agencies worldwide. 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 91
  89. 89. URISA GIS Management Institute® GMI Core Strategy: • The GMI core strategy is to help those who deploy, operate, and manage GIS organizations enhance their personal competency, and improve the effectiveness and ROI from their investment in GIS. • The GMI will mobilize volunteer GIS professionals (to be called GMI Associates) to create the GMBOK, comprised of individual GIS Best Practices. • The GMBOK will be developed by starting with frameworks that have already been developed by URISA, such as the GMCM and the GISCMM. • Topics for individual GIS Management Best Practices will be developed from the 23 capability and 22 maturity components of the GISCMM. • Each topic will include a narrative of the best practice, a policy template, recommended metrics, a description of required professional competencies to support the best practice, and recommended learning objectives to inform the development of a curriculum to teach the best practice. 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 93
  90. 90. GIS Management Institute® Conceptual Diagram 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 94
  91. 91. GIS Management Institute® Conceptual Diagram 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 95
  92. 92. • New URISA GMI Service: Enterprise GIS Assessment/Accreditation: – Online survey instrument – Self assessment with validation mechanisms – Compilation of bench marking metrics – Evaluation against GISCMM – Manager assessment against GMCM – Feedback report with benchmark analysis and development recommendations – Future GMI Maturity Level Accreditation 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 96
  93. 93. Enhancing Sustainable Enterprise GIS 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 97
  94. 94. Enterprise GIS Metric Report Template 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 98
  95. 95. Enterprise GIS Capability Assessment Report Template 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 99
  96. 96. Enterprise GIS Data Assessment Report Template 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 100
  97. 97. 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 101 Enterprise GIS Maturity Assessment Report Template
  98. 98. Enhancing professionalism for GIS managers The competency of the GIS manager is one of the key success factors for an effective enterprise GIS 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 102
  99. 99. Enterprise GIS Management Competency Report Template Assessing the competency of a GIS manager against the Geospatial Management Competency Model 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 103
  100. 100. The GIS Capability Maturity Model and the GIS Management Institute® Attendee Discussion and Feedback Do you have any: – Questions? – Suggestions? – Criticisms? – Ideas for using the GISCMM of the GIS Management Institute? – Other comments? 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 104
  101. 101. Do we need to develop best practices for GIS management? Please vote by getting involved: Yes No www.urisa.org/main/gis-management-institute/ 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 105
  102. 102. GISCMM Development Contributors: 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 106
  103. 103. Contributors: 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 107
  104. 104. Instructor Contact Information Greg Babinski, MA, GISP URISA Past-President URISA GMI Committee Chair W: www.urisa.org/main/gis-management-institute/ Finance & Marketing Manager King County GIS Center 201 South Jackson Street MS: KSC-IT-0706 Seattle, WA 98104 USA P: 206-477-4402 F: 206-263-3145 E: greg.babinski@kingcounty.gov T: @gbabinski W: www.kingcounty.gov/gis 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 108
  105. 105. Instructor Contact Information Amy Esnard, MSc, GISP URISA Director, Board of Directors URISA GMI Committee Liaison to the Board of Directors W: www.urisa.org/main/gis-management-institute/ GIS Consultant - Strategic Business Analysis Hood River, Oregon P: 503-385-5230 E: amilution@gmail.com in: amy-esnard 4/6/2016 Copyright @ URISA 2014 109

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