Municipal GIS Capability Maturity Model Questionnaire

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This is the questionnaire developed for the preliminary Municipal GIS Capability Model (GIS CMM). It was distributed to city and county GIS managers in Washington States and the results tabulated and analyzed in my paper presented at the 2009 URISA Annual Conference.

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Municipal GIS Capability Maturity Model Questionnaire

  1. 1. DRAFT MUNICIPAL GIS CAPABILITY MATURITY MODEL V.1 SEPTEMBER 2009 QUESTIONNAIRE G. BABINSKI, GISP, KING COUNTY GIS CENTER Participant Identification: Name of Municipal GIS Organization: ____________________ ______ ___________________ Name of Participant: _____________________________________ Title: ___________________ Participant Phone & Email: ________________________________________________________ Date of Response: _____________________________ Introduction GIS development life cycle: GIS development typically starts as an idea and progresses through a development and implementation phase towards a state of internally defined maturity. The reality of municipal GIS operations is that development is limited by available funds. Often GIS starts as a capital project with the system designed to create the ‘best GIS possible’ with the funds at hand. This development scenario leads to frequent compromise and deferral of many aspects of ideal GIS development in order to ‘go operational’ quickly and start delivering value for the agency’s investment. Even if a GIS implementation project is completed successfully, it does not mean that an agency has a truly mature GIS, or even a cost-effective GIS operation. What is maturity? For the typical GIS development life cycle presented above it means that development has stopped. However, for an organism, maturity is defined in relationship to other organisms of similar nature. The maturity of an organism can be defined by certain measurable characteristics of a physical nature. In the case of humans, other intelligence and emotional characteristics can also be measured to assess maturity level. If an organism stops developing without achieving certain physical, intelligence, or emotional characteristics, it is defined as immature. GIS professional staff often know that their operation could benefit from enhancement and refinement, but funds, staff, or time for further development are very difficult to come by. Enhancements are often developed as part of GIS operations, but rarely on a systematic basis with a desired end state in mind. What is a ‘Capability Maturity Model? A ‘Capability Maturity Model’ (CMM) is defined as a tool to assess an organization’s ability to accomplish a defined task or set of tasks. The concept of a capability maturity model originated with the Software Engineering Institute (SEI) as a means of assessing the capability of software contractors to complete large software design and development projects successfully. SEI published ‘Managing the Software Process’ in 1989 and continues to refine the software capability maturity model. The Software CMM is ‘process focused’ in that it is based on how an organization performs the individual processes that are involved in software design and development. Since the development of the SEI CMM, the capability maturity model concept has been applied in other areas, including: • System engineering • Project management • Risk management • Information technology services The typical capability maturity model is based on an assessment of the subject organization’s maturity level based on the characteristics of the organization’s approach to individual defined processes. These processes are usually defined as: • Level 1 – Ad hoc (chaotic) processes - typically in reaction to a need to get something done. • Level 2 – Repeatable processes – typically based on recalling and repeating how the process was done the last time. • Level 3 – Defined process – the process is written down (documented) and serves to guide consistent performance within the organization.
  2. 2. DRAFT MUNICIPAL GIS CAPABILITY MATURITY MODEL QUESTIONNAIRE – PAGE 2 • Level 4 – Managed process – the documented process is measured when performed and the measurements are compiled for analysis. Changing system conditions are managed by adapting the defined process to meet the conditions. • Level 5 – Optimized processes – The defined and managed process is improved on an on-going basis by institutionalized process improvement planning and implementation. Optimization may be tied to quantified performance goals. GIS Maturity Assessments In 2001 Gaudet, Annulis, and Carr published the ‘Workforce Development Model for Geospatial Technology.’ Although not an organizational maturity or capability assessment, it does provide a systematic approach to defining the core job functions (defined as roles) of a GIS organization and the competencies associated with each of the functions. In 2007 the States of Georgia and Texas began collaborative development of a State GIS Maturity Assessment. This assessment focuses on a number of typical state GIS program and project related components. These components fall into seven broad categories: • Geospatial Coordination and Collaboration • Geospatial Data Development • GIS Resource Discovery and Access • Statewide Partnership Programs • Participation in Pertinent National Partnership Programs and Initiatives • Geospatial Polices, Standards, Guidelines, and Best Practices • Training, Education, and Professional Networking Activities Within these seven categories, state GIS organizations assess their development in 56 specific detailed characteristics based on their current implementation of each characteristic: 1.00 pt – Fully Implemented 0.75 pt. – In progress with full resources available to complete implementation 0.50 pt. – In progress with partial resources available for implementation 0.25 pt. – Planned – with resources assigned 0.00 pt. – Not planned with no resources assigned Because the State GIS Maturity Assessment is focused on the typical coordination function of many state’s GIS, it is unsuitable for municipal GIS, with its enterprise operations focus and business end-user responsibilities. Why develop a Municipal GIS Capability Maturity Model? Municipalities with GIS should have an interest in assessing the capability of their system. Like biological organisms, the progress of an agency’s GIS development is dependent on nourishment (resources). Unlike biological organisms, the development of a GIS can be stopped, restarted, or degraded based on the provision or lack of key resources. GIS managers and municipal decision makers should have an interest in assessing the maturity level of their GIS to help formulate policy decisions related to the resources to be provided for their GIS. GIS in a municipal environment is a highly complex system. Indeed, many of the processes that have had the CMM approach applied to them in the past are themselves interdependent components of a municipal GIS. Because of this complexity, it is useful to think about the ideal capability of a municipal GIS operation in theoretical terms and then analyze and measure individual GIS operations against this theoretical ideal state. The purpose of this proposed model is to provide a means for any municipal GIS operation to gauge its maturity against a variety of standards and/or measures, including: • A theoretical ideal end state of GIS organizational development • The maturity level of other peer GIS organizations, either individually or in aggregate • The maturity level of the subject organization over time • The maturity level of the organization against an agreed target state (perhaps set by organizational policy, budget limitations, etc.) What is meant by ‘Municipal GIS operations’? For this study municipal GIS operations refers to city or county agencies that are responsible for typical municipal government services as commonly defined in the United States. The term also implies an enterprise-wide view of GIS operations, as opposed to GIS as used within individual departments within a municipality.
  3. 3. DRAFT MUNICIPAL GIS CAPABILITY MATURITY MODEL QUESTIONNAIRE – PAGE 3 What is meant by ‘maturity’ in relation to municipal GIS operations? Maturity for the proposed model indicates progression of an organization towards GIS capability that maximizes the potential for the use of state-of-the-art GIS technology, commonly recognized quality data, and organizational best practices appropriate for municipal business use. Just as maturity does not indicate old age, the concept of GIS maturity is not related to years of operation. Maturity also does not necessarily mean that an organization excels at every aspect of GIS operations. Just like a mature person may have well developed athletic and math abilities, but intermediate cooking ability, and poor mechanical abilities, a mature GIS operation may excel at some of the characteristics inherent in GIS operations, but be less developed in others. However, this model assumes that there is a developmental ideal for GIS operations that any agency strives to achieve. This is similar to the classic Greek ideal of striving to excel at all of the intellectual, mechanical, and physical aspects of life. What are the characteristics of municipal GIS operations that are used to assess an agency’s maturity level? The Municipal GIS Capability Maturity Model assumes two broad areas of GIS operational development: enabling capability and execution ability. Enabling capability can be thought of as the technology, data, resources, and related infrastructure that is bought, developed, or otherwise acquired to support typical municipal GIS operations. This capability is analogous to organic physical development. Enabling capability components includes GIS organizational structure, management, and professional staff. Execution ability can be thought of as a measure of how the GIS staff members utilize the enabling technology at its disposal, relative to a normative ideal. It focuses on how the GIS staff members perform key processes related to municipal GIS operations. Execution ability is analogous to the development of intelligence and emotional development in an organism. Enabling capability and execution ability are subject to separate assessments as part of the GIS CMM. The components of the GIS CMM and the assessment categories The GIS Capability Maturity Model assumes that mature agencies have more well developed enabling technology and resources, and that their processes and practices maximize the effectiveness of their GIS infrastructure. In the following GIS CMM questionnaire, the questions are categorized by enabling capability and execution ability. For each question, the respondent is asked to self assess their organization and provide comments. The enabling capability assessment scale is modeled after the State GIS Maturity Assessment. Because GIS enabling capability is to some degree dependent on resource availability, the State GIS Maturity Assessment Scale (with its resource-commitment focus) is well suited (with minor modifications) to indicate municipal GIS capability. The execution ability assessment scale is modeled after the typical CMM process-based five-level scale. Because the execution ability of a mature GIS organization depends on how well it performs in key process areas, the typical CMM assessment scale (with its focus on process execution sophistication) is well-suited to indicating ability. The GIS CMM Questionnaire and the assessment process Once agencies complete the questionnaire, they will have a benchmark resource for future self assessments. Once the questionnaires are compiled and analyzed, the analysis information will be provided to each agency that participates in the study. It will also be presented in aggregate at professional meeting and in papers. Agencies can use this aggregate information to compare themselves with other municipalities.
  4. 4. DRAFT MUNICIPAL GIS CAPABILITY MATURITY MODEL QUESTIONNAIRE – PAGE 4 References Capability Maturity Model, Wikepedia Article: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capability_Maturity_Model Accessed 8/3/2009). Selena Rezvani, M.S.W., An Introduction to Organizational Maturity Assessment: Measuring Organizational Capabilities, International Public Management Association Assessment Council, ND. Jerry Simonoff, Director, IT Investment & Enterprise Solutions, Improving IT investment Management in the Commonwealth, Virginia Information Technology Agency, 2008. Curtis, B., Hefley, W. E., and Miller, S. A.; People Capability Maturity Model (P-CMM), Software Engineering Institute, 2001. Niessink, F., Clerca, V., Tijdinka, T., and van Vlietb, H., The IT Service Capability Maturity Model, CIBIT Consultants | Educators, 2005 Ford-Bey, M., PA Consulting Group, Proving the Business Benefits of GeoWeb Initiatives: An ROI-Driven Approach, GeoWeb Conference, 2008. Niessink, F. and van Vliet, H., Towards Mature IT Services, Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, ND. Gaudet, C., Annulis, H., and Carr, J., Workforce Development Models for Geospatial Technology, University of Southern Mississippi, 2001.
  5. 5. DRAFT MUNICIPAL GIS CAPABILITY MATURITY MODEL QUESTIONNAIRE – PAGE 5 Name of Municipal GIS Organization: GIS Capability Maturity Model Score Card Enabling Capability Components For each question in the ‘Enabling Capability’ section, read the brief description. Check the implementation category that best describes your agency’s current status. Feel free to include any clarifying comments or questions. 1. Framework GIS Data The agency has access to adequate framework GIS data to meet its business needs. For the GIS CMM, framework data is defined as NSDI framework layers (see: http://www.fgdc.gov/framework/). [ ] 1.00 Fully implemented [ ] 0.75 In progress with full resources available to achieve the capability [ ] 0.50 In progress but with only partial resources available to achieve the capability [ ] 0.25 Planned and with resources available to achieve the capability [ ] 0.00 This is not planned or it is planned but no resources are available Comments: 2. Framework GIS Data Maintenance One or more data stewards are defined for each framework GIS data layer and the data is maintained (kept up to date) to meet business needs. [ ] 1.00 Fully implemented [ ] 0.75 In progress with full resources available to achieve the capability [ ] 0.50 In progress but with only partial resources available to achieve the capability [ ] 0.25 Planned and with resources available to achieve the capability [ ] 0.00 This is not planned or it is planned but no resources are available Comments: 3. Business GIS Data The agency has access to adequate business data (non-framework GIS data) to meet its business needs. [ ] 1.00 Fully implemented [ ] 0.75 In progress with full resources available to achieve the capability [ ] 0.50 In progress but with only partial resources available to achieve the capability [ ] 0.25 Planned and with resources available to achieve the capability [ ] 0.00 This is not planned or it is planned but no resources are available Comments: 4. Business GIS Data Maintenance One or more data stewards are defined for each business GIS data layer and the data is maintained (kept up to date) to meet business needs. [ ] 1.00 Fully implemented [ ] 0.75 In progress with full resources available to achieve the capability [ ] 0.50 In progress but with only partial resources available to achieve the capability [ ] 0.25 Planned and with resources available to achieve the capability [ ] 0.00 This is not planned or it is planned but no resources are available Comments:
  6. 6. DRAFT MUNICIPAL GIS CAPABILITY MATURITY MODEL QUESTIONNAIRE – PAGE 6 5. Metadata Metadata is available and maintained for all framework and business data layers. Metadata complies with FGDC standards or, alternately, meets internally defined standards that support the business needs of the agency. [ ] 1.00 Fully implemented [ ] 0.75 In progress with full resources available to achieve the capability [ ] 0.50 In progress but with only partial resources available to achieve the capability [ ] 0.25 Planned and with resources available to achieve the capability [ ] 0.00 This is not planned or it is planned but no resources are available Comments: 6. Spatial Data Warehouse A centralized spatial data warehouse is available for data stewards to house production framework and business data and for GIS users to access data for GIS applications. [ ] 1.00 Fully implemented [ ] 0.75 In progress with full resources available to achieve the capability [ ] 0.50 In progress but with only partial resources available to achieve the capability [ ] 0.25 Planned and with resources available to achieve the capability [ ] 0.00 This is not planned or it is planned but no resources are available Comments: 7. Architectural Design An architectural design exists that defines the current state and planned future development of the technical infrastructure. The architectural design guides the investment in GIS technical infrastructure, including servers, data storage, applications, network components, etc. [ ] 1.00 Fully implemented [ ] 0.75 In progress with full resources available to achieve the capability [ ] 0.50 In progress but with only partial resources available to achieve the capability [ ] 0.25 Planned and with resources available to achieve the capability [ ] 0.00 This is not planned or it is planned but no resources are available Comments: 8. Technical Infrastructure The technical infrastructure is in place to maintain and operate the GIS. Technical infrastructure includes hardware (servers, storage, desktops, input and output peripherals), network components, operating system, and GIS software. [ ] 1.00 Fully implemented [ ] 0.75 In progress with full resources available to achieve the capability [ ] 0.50 In progress but with only partial resources available to achieve the capability [ ] 0.25 Planned and with resources available to achieve the capability [ ] 0.00 This is not planned or it is planned but no resources are available Comments:
  7. 7. DRAFT MUNICIPAL GIS CAPABILITY MATURITY MODEL QUESTIONNAIRE – PAGE 7 9. Replacement Plan A plan is in place and implemented to replace technical infrastructure components (hardware, network components, imagery) that have a defined ‘end of useful life.’ [ ] 1.00 Fully implemented [ ] 0.75 In progress with full resources available to achieve the capability [ ] 0.50 In progress but with only partial resources available to achieve the capability [ ] 0.25 Planned and with resources available to achieve the capability [ ] 0.00 This is not planned or it is planned but no resources are available Comments: 10. GIS Software Maintenance GIS software is available to meet the agency’s business needs. If commercial software is used, it is under maintenance to ensure long term support and development. If open-source’ GIS software is used, an alternate maintenance, support, and development capability is available. [ ] 1.00 Fully implemented [ ] 0.75 In progress with full resources available to achieve the capability [ ] 0.50 In progress but with only partial resources available to achieve the capability [ ] 0.25 Planned and with resources available to achieve the capability [ ] 0.00 This is not planned or it is planned but no resources are available Comments: 11. Data back-up and security A computer back-up system is in place to ensure the security of GIS data and applications. The backup system is tested periodically by running both automated routines and manual processes to restore sample data. System security is in place to control internal and external access to GIS data and applications as appropriate. [ ] 1.00 Fully implemented [ ] 0.75 In progress with full resources available to achieve the capability [ ] 0.50 In progress but with only partial resources available to achieve the capability [ ] 0.25 Planned and with resources available to achieve the capability [ ] 0.00 This is not planned or it is planned but no resources are available Comments: 12. GIS Application Portfolio A portfolio of custom or commercial off-the-shelf GIS applications is available to meet the business needs of GIS clients. [ ] 1.00 Fully implemented [ ] 0.75 In progress with full resources available to achieve the capability [ ] 0.50 In progress but with only partial resources available to achieve the capability [ ] 0.25 Planned and with resources available to achieve the capability [ ] 0.00 This is not planned or it is planned but no resources are available Comments: 13. GIS Application Portfolio Management The agency’s GIS application portfolio is managed to a common design and development framework. [ ] 1.00 Fully implemented [ ] 0.75 In progress with full resources available to achieve the capability [ ] 0.50 In progress but with only partial resources available to achieve the capability [ ] 0.25 Planned and with resources available to achieve the capability [ ] 0.00 This is not planned or it is planned but no resources are available Comments:
  8. 8. DRAFT MUNICIPAL GIS CAPABILITY MATURITY MODEL QUESTIONNAIRE – PAGE 8 14. GIS Application Portfolio Operation and Maintenance The agency’s GIS application portfolio is kept viable via ongoing support and application maintenance. [ ] 1.00 Fully implemented [ ] 0.75 In progress with full resources available to achieve the capability [ ] 0.50 In progress but with only partial resources available to achieve the capability [ ] 0.25 Planned and with resources available to achieve the capability [ ] 0.00 This is not planned or it is planned but no resources are available Comments: 15. Professional GIS Management The agency GIS is managed by a dedicated, professional GIS manager. [ ] 1.00 Fully implemented [ ] 0.75 In progress with full resources available to achieve the capability [ ] 0.50 In progress but with only partial resources available to achieve the capability [ ] 0.25 Planned and with resources available to achieve the capability [ ] 0.00 This is not planned or it is planned but no resources are available Comments: 16. Professional GIS Operations Staff The agency GIS is operated and maintained by an adequate staff of GIS professionals. (For purposes of the GIS CMM, adequate operational staffing is defined as meeting the ‘roles’ defined by the Geospatial Technology Competency Model – see: http://www.aag.org/Roundtable/Resources/gaudet-et-al-2003.pdf - table 4). [ ] 1.00 Fully implemented [ ] 0.75 In progress with full resources available to achieve the capability [ ] 0.50 In progress but with only partial resources available to achieve the capability [ ] 0.25 Planned and with resources available to achieve the capability [ ] 0.00 This is not planned or it is planned but no resources are available Comments: 17. GIS Staff Training and Professional Development The agency GIS manager and other professional staff have access to on-going training to maintain and develop their technical and operational knowledge, skills, and abilities. [ ] 1.00 Fully implemented [ ] 0.75 In progress with full resources available to achieve the capability [ ] 0.50 In progress but with only partial resources available to achieve the capability [ ] 0.25 Planned and with resources available to achieve the capability [ ] 0.00 This is not planned or it is planned but no resources are available Comments: 18. GIS Governance Structure The agency has a formal GIS governance structure that links the GIS operation both to users (typically via a GIS technical committee or user committee) and to key decision makers (typically via an oversight committee). [ ] 1.00 Fully implemented [ ] 0.75 In progress with full resources available to achieve the capability [ ] 0.50 In progress but with only partial resources available to achieve the capability [ ] 0.25 Planned and with resources available to achieve the capability [ ] 0.00 This is not planned or it is planned but no resources are available Comments:
  9. 9. DRAFT MUNICIPAL GIS CAPABILITY MATURITY MODEL QUESTIONNAIRE – PAGE 9 19. GIS is Linked to Agency Strategic Goals The GIS exists as a defined organizational unit of the agency with a clearly defined role in supporting the strategic goals of the agency. [ ] 1.00 Fully implemented [ ] 0.75 In progress with full resources available to achieve the capability [ ] 0.50 In progress but with only partial resources available to achieve the capability [ ] 0.25 Planned and with resources available to achieve the capability [ ] 0.00 This is not planned or it is planned but no resources are available Comments: 20. GIS Budget and Funding The GIS unit develops a comprehensive budget and has dedicated funding for its operations, including (at a minimum) labor, hardware, software, data, consulting, and training costs. [ ] 1.00 Fully implemented [ ] 0.75 In progress with full resources available to achieve the capability [ ] 0.50 In progress but with only partial resources available to achieve the capability [ ] 0.25 Planned and with resources available to achieve the capability [ ] 0.00 This is not planned or it is planned but no resources are available Comments: 21. GIS Financial Plan The GIS unit has a financial plan that includes a funding model (where the money is coming from) and that also projects future episodic costs for software, equipment, consulting, imagery replacement, etc. [ ] 1.00 Fully implemented [ ] 0.75 In progress with full resources available to achieve the capability [ ] 0.50 In progress but with only partial resources available to achieve the capability [ ] 0.25 Planned and with resources available to achieve the capability [ ] 0.00 This is not planned or it is planned but no resources are available Comments:
  10. 10. DRAFT MUNICIPAL GIS CAPABILITY MATURITY MODEL QUESTIONNAIRE – PAGE 10 Execution Ability Components For each question in the ‘Execution Ability’ section, read the brief question and description. Check the implementation category that best describes your agency’s current status. Feel free to include any clarifying comments or questions. 1. Client Services Evaluation and Development How does the GIS unit evaluate agency business needs for GIS services and develop new client service requests? [ ] Level Five: Optimized processes [ ] Level Four: Managed and measured processes [ ] Level Three: Defined processes [ ] Level Two: Repeatable processes [ ] Level One: Ad-hoc processes Comments: 2. Service Delivery Tracking and Oversight How does the GIS unit track, monitor, and evaluate client service delivery? [ ] Level Five: Optimized processes [ ] Level Four: Managed and measured processes [ ] Level Three: Defined processes [ ] Level Two: Repeatable processes [ ] Level One: Ad-hoc processes Comments: 3. Service Quality Assurance How does the GIS unit ensure the quality of services provided to clients? [ ] Level Five: Optimized processes [ ] Level Four: Managed and measured processes [ ] Level Three: Defined processes [ ] Level Two: Repeatable processes [ ] Level One: Ad-hoc processes Comments: 4. Application Development Methodology How does the GIS unit develop custom GIS applications? [ ] Level Five: Optimized processes [ ] Level Four: Managed and measured processes [ ] Level Three: Defined processes [ ] Level Two: Repeatable processes [ ] Level One: Ad-hoc processes Comments: 5. Project Management Methodology How does the GIS unit manage projects for which it is responsible? Projects could be either executed in-house or by an outside contractor. [ ] Level Five: Optimized processes [ ] Level Four: Managed and measured processes [ ] Level Three: Defined processes [ ] Level Two: Repeatable processes [ ] Level One: Ad-hoc processes Comments:
  11. 11. DRAFT MUNICIPAL GIS CAPABILITY MATURITY MODEL QUESTIONNAIRE – PAGE 11 6. Quality Assurance and Quality Control How does the GIS unit assure a reasonable and appropriate level of quality for projects and for ongoing GIS system operation? System operations include database maintenance and spatial data warehouse processes. [ ] Level Five: Optimized processes [ ] Level Four: Managed and measured processes [ ] Level Three: Defined processes [ ] Level Two: Repeatable processes [ ] Level One: Ad-hoc processes Comments: 7. GIS System Management How does the GIS unit manage the core GIS systems that it is responsible for? GIS system management includes system administration, database administration, network administration, system security, data backup, security, and restore processes, etc. [ ] Level Five: Optimized processes [ ] Level Four: Managed and measured processes [ ] Level Three: Defined processes [ ] Level Two: Repeatable processes [ ] Level One: Ad-hoc processes Comments: 8. Process Event Management How does the GIS unit manage GIS system process events? Typical process events include planned hardware and software upgrades, unplanned hardware failure and data loss and restore events. [ ] Level Five: Optimized processes [ ] Level Four: Managed and measured processes [ ] Level Three: Defined processes [ ] Level Two: Repeatable processes [ ] Level One: Ad-hoc processes Comments: 9. User Support, Help Desk, and End-User Training How does the GIS unit support end users, including user guides, help documentation, training, and ad-hoc help-desk and/or on-site support? [ ] Level Five: Optimized processes [ ] Level Four: Managed and measured processes [ ] Level Three: Defined processes [ ] Level Two: Repeatable processes [ ] Level One: Ad-hoc processes Comments: 10. Contract and Supplier Management How does the GIS unit manage its purchasing and contracting processes to ensure the best value for the supplies and services that it acquires? [ ] Level Five: Optimized processes [ ] Level Four: Managed and measured processes [ ] Level Three: Defined processes [ ] Level Two: Repeatable processes [ ] Level One: Ad-hoc processes Comments:
  12. 12. DRAFT MUNICIPAL GIS CAPABILITY MATURITY MODEL QUESTIONNAIRE – PAGE 12 11. Regional Collaboration How does the GIS unit manage regional collaboration to ensure that opportunities to share in the development and operation of data, infrastructure, and applications are pursued, and that the agency’s GIS is leveraged to benefit other potential local partners? [ ] Level Five: Optimized processes [ ] Level Four: Managed and measured processes [ ] Level Three: Defined processes [ ] Level Two: Repeatable processes [ ] Level One: Ad-hoc processes Comments: 12. Staff Development How does the GIS unit manage the process of developing its staff to ensure that individual staff member skills are developed appropriate to current and emerging technical and business needs? How does the GIS unit ensure that its staff resources meet its operational requirements for individual GIS competencies, including back-up and succession planning? [ ] Level Five: Optimized processes [ ] Level Four: Managed and measured processes [ ] Level Three: Defined processes [ ] Level Two: Repeatable processes [ ] Level One: Ad-hoc processes Comments: 13. Performance Management How does the GIS unit manage performance, including both individual performance and the performance of the GIS unit as a whole? [ ] Level Five: Optimized processes [ ] Level Four: Managed and measured processes [ ] Level Three: Defined processes [ ] Level Two: Repeatable processes [ ] Level One: Ad-hoc processes Comments: 14. Client Satisfaction Monitoring and Assurance How does the GIS unit monitor, assess, and assure the satisfaction of its clients? Ideally clients should be surveyed to indicate their satisfaction with individual projects or products and with the municipal GIS operation as a whole. [ ] Level Five: Optimized processes [ ] Level Four: Managed and measured processes [ ] Level Three: Defined processes [ ] Level Two: Repeatable processes [ ] Level One: Ad-hoc processes Comments: Please provide any final general comments here: Thank you for participating in this survey. W:gbprofessionalMuniGISCMMMuniGISCMM-Draft-Questionairre.doc

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