Cue Entertainment Magazine January issue 2008 



                                                                
       ...
theatrical media advertising spend was £197m (+6.5% versus the previous 
year) with TV advertising accounting for 40% of t...
focus at the top end on big budget films and at the ‘bottom end’ art house. 
Anything in the middle he says is getting los...
techniques. “The real opportunity lies in ‘customer relationships’ Debra 
Shepherd suggests. “It’s about enhancing the cus...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Changing Landscape Is Affecting The Marketing Of Movies

590 views

Published on

The state of play for those operating in the film business at the first stage of the distribution cycle (Cinema) is at a tipping point. Rapidly evolving disruptive technology, changing consumer behaviour and wider entertainment choice are all influencing the viability and sustainability of the cinema going audience.

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
590
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
17
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
10
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Changing Landscape Is Affecting The Marketing Of Movies

  1. 1. Cue Entertainment Magazine January issue 2008      Marketing Movies Theatrically    The state of play for those operating in the film business at the first stage of  the distribution cycle (Cinema) is at a tipping point. Rapidly evolving disruptive  technology, changing consumer behaviour and wider entertainment choice are  all influencing the viability and sustainability of the cinema going audience.  New and emerging interactive platforms (including online, mobile, gaming and  user generated content) are the key disruptive drivers of a changing industry,  confirmed by a recent survey by Nokia and The Future Laboratory which  suggests that by 2012, a quarter of all entertainment will be user‐generated. In  addition, the well documented issues surrounding piracy, windows, a writers’  strike in the US and a recent Screen Digest report that suggests that rising costs  and declining revenues from DVD, will only add to a growing headache for  executives in the film business.  A headache made worse by a recent report from Global Media Intelligence  that predicts that the 132 films distributed by the six leading Hollywood  studios in 2006 will make a pretax loss of $1.9 billion (£920 million) and a  steady decline in the number of cinema admissions in the UK from 180 million  to 165 million over four years, although some observers will point out that this  year has been a bumper year and forecast to deliver 175m admissions.   So given significant disruption what are the opportunities? Is the role of  marketing keeping pace with changing consumer behaviour and choice? How  do the middle‐ranking and small box office titles compete?  How do studios  and exhibitors start to re‐engage the cinema going audience to capture  growth?   At first glance, ad‐spend analysis by Neilson suggests that the way movies are  marketed still retain traditional routes to market with only a small change in  investment deployment. In the year to October of 2007, total paid for 
  2. 2. theatrical media advertising spend was £197m (+6.5% versus the previous  year) with TV advertising accounting for 40% of the mix, outdoor 35% and  Press 5%.The internet, still only accounts for 3% of total spend (although these  figures don’t include non‐paid for space such as PR and Publicity).  So why does the focus remain on TV advertising? And does it reflect the  changing dynamics of consumer channel consumption, engagement and  interaction? Grace Carley of All Alliance Marketing (AIM) suggests “it’s the  bigger studios and big budget titles that are more adept at marketing films  effectively, but probably as a result of significant marketing budgets”.   It’s a point which Debra Shepherd, marketing director Paramount agrees: “we  are moving with the times, but for blockbuster‐type movie, traditional  channels such as TV and Outdoor remain the key focus”.   Shepherd goes onto say that this year she has been looking at the online space  to promote their movies and have started to create marketing campaigns  across Bebo, Myspace and You Tube properties amongst others.   If there is an over reliance on TV does that mean an over reliance on the  traditional TV trailer? Carley says “I don’t believe the trailer is dead but I think  it’s just become ubiquitous”. Ed Blum who directed Scenes of a Sexual Nature  agrees: “I don’t believe the trailer is dead but over reliance on it is dangerous.  Marketing probably has to start much earlier than the three to four months  normally set aside to raise the film’s profile in the market place. Other more  complicated and sophisticated marketing ploys should be used many months  before the release of the film”.  Shepherd cites the example of Paramount’s marketing support for Disturbia as  innovative and beyond the traditional creative route by weaving promotion of  the film into Bebo’s Kate Modern broadcasts, to market the film to a core  social networking audience.  So if the focus for the market appears always driven by the blockbuster, what  chance for the rest of the market? Blum believes that the theatrical market is  becoming too crowded, compounded by the well versed problem of wider  entertainment choice and that the market is splitting into two parts with a 
  3. 3. focus at the top end on big budget films and at the ‘bottom end’ art house.  Anything in the middle he says is getting lost.  “I don’t think independent films with small or medium size distributors  attached can compete with the big distributors in a traditional marketing  manner” he says. “The independent film and the small to medium distributor  have to become more innovative in the way they market their films”.   And that’s the point. Big budget movies with big marketing budgets have the  ability to invest across multi channels, promotional tie‐ups and PR & Publicity  but not always innovatively.  Mass market audience means multi channel  investment, but not so for the rest of the market which makes up the greater  volume of titles.   It’s a tough market but it’s not all doom and gloom suggests David Hancock, an  analyst at Screen Digest. “Whilst the number of films being distributed has  doubled over recent years, the number of blockbuster titles has remained the  same. What’s interesting is that whilst the smaller to medium sized enterprises  in the film creation and distribution market have a battle on their hands in  terms of achieving cut through on limited marketing budgets, their approach  tends to be more innovative.”  You only have to look at recent film launches to see a radical shift in traditional  distribution and marketing techniques. Ed Burn’s Broken Violets ‘premiered’  on iTunes and in doing so captured an unsurprising amount of publicity and  more recently the announcement (on ITV’s 10 o’clock news) that Hammer will  be producing a move for the first time in 30 years in episodic format to be  broadcast on Myspace in 2008  The recent film Once, a romance between an Irish musician and married  woman built its audience through word of mouth; 30 Days of Night’s Josh  Hartnett, the star, personally invited viewers of ITV2 & 4 in one ad to watch  the trailer in another ad; and New Line Cinema’s Shoot ‘Em Up’s online micro‐ site and viral campaign through www.bulletproofbaby.net suggests that  marketing of films is indeed moving with the times.  So what role for exhibitors in this brave new world of marketing movies?  Several observers suggest that exhibitors need to apply wholly new marketing 
  4. 4. techniques. “The real opportunity lies in ‘customer relationships’ Debra  Shepherd suggests. “It’s about enhancing the customer experience  and the  exhibitors can achieve it through building an effective database through which  innovative and compelling offers to retain and grow the frequency of visits”.  David Hancock agrees: “consumer understanding and segmentation will  become more important and I can see an opportunity for collaboration  amongst studios and exhibitors in reaching niche audiences and to develop  creative marketing strategies that resonate with these audiences rather than  alienate.  To some extent a new digital infrastructure and 3‐D will also play a critical role  for success and the ability of digital to schedule films in what was once ‘dead  time’.  But the key criteria for success, lies in niche marketing both from a  product and geographical perspective and building customer relationship  programmes. If blockbusters are to remain the majority of cinema viewing  then not before long, declining cinema audiences will prevail. The  entertainment choice will start to be experienced elsewhere. It’s already  happening.    Gavin Miller writing for Cue Entertainment January 2008     

×