Kingston Frontenac Ethno-cultural Food Project

Presentation to

Eastern Ontario Local Food Conference
December 3, 2013
WC...
Presentation contents
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•

Background
Project introduction and purpose
Objectives
Partners
Some co...
Trivia…or is it?
• In the 1930s
–The main meal required 2.5 hours
of preparation
• (usually by Mom!)

• In 2008
–The main ...
Background
• Changing ethno-cultural trends in Ontario imply demand
for food products that are familiar to these ethnic gr...
Objectives
• Focus on ethno-cultural food specific to
identified Newcomer groups
• Work with the agriculture, agri-food an...
Partners
• Frontenac Community Futures Development
Corporation
• Kingston Immigration Partnership
• Kingston Downtown King...
Some consumer perspectives on “local”
• When asked, most consumers will identify various characteristics
of food that caus...
Some consumer perspectives on “local”
• “Local” often carries with it realities and perceptions:
– Better quality
– Freshe...
Some consumer perspectives on “local”
• Reports on trends in local food have consumers showing a
preference for local food...
Some commercial food buyers perspectives on “local”

• Buyers of food recognise the demand for “local”
• Buyers of “local”...
What is a “brand”
• A brand is not a label
– A label can be created overnight
– A brand will take years to develop

• A br...
“Local is a brand”
• “Local” is brand that evokes impressions and
expectations in the mind of a consumer
– Whatever the pr...
Other implications for local producers
• Food safety is becoming a larger concern
• “Local” is the simplest means by which...
Half Way !

Eastern Ontario Local Food Conference

December 3 2013

14
Project methodology
• Consumer surveys of local food demand
in Kingston-Frontenac area
– Random general population
– Perso...
What we wanted to know (sample)
•
•

•
•
•
•
•
•
•

Desire to purchase ethno-cultural food that is produced, processed and...
Outcome highlights

Eastern Ontario Local Food Conference

December 3 2013

17
Consumer survey respondents

Ethnocultural group
members
27%

General
population
73%

Eastern Ontario Local Food Conferenc...
Respondent ethno-cultural origins

South Asian
3%
Middle
Eastern
38%

Latin
American
3%

East Asian
56%

Eastern Ontario L...
General information
Ethno-cultural
groups

General
Population

2.6

2.7

Amount spent on food-groceries in a
week
Percenta...
Price premium potential for locally available product
Ethno-cultural Groups

General Population

Percentage of respondents...
Importance of purchasing characteristics
Ethno-cultural Groups

General Population

Freshness

Ethno-cultural
groups hold
...
Importance of purchasing characteristics
Ethno-cultural Groups

General Population

Purchase from local ethnic grocery sto...
Some products identified
Chinese buns
Canned foods
Chinese chive
Chinese specialty products
Hot pepper paste
Konnyaku (yam...
Some comments noted
• It would be great to buy locally; would save trips to Toronto
• There is a lack of real ethnic food ...
Some comments noted
• There is a demand for ethno-cultural foods
• Many stores have product from my country of origin but ...
Next steps
• Determine what opportunities exist as a
result of the data analysis
• Determine if added knowledge/skills are...
…and thank you for your time
When completed, the formal report will be available on the
Frontenac Community Futures Develo...
Eastern Ontario Local Food Conference

December 3 2013

29
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Eolfc 2013 wcm consulting - kingston and frontenac ethno-cultural research project

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Earlier this year the Frontenac Community Futures Development Corporation in partnership with the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture and Food, and the Ministry of Rural Affairs, The Kingston Immigration partnership and the other local organizations, began a pilot project to determine the market demand for ethno-cultural food and emerging food. Learn more about the consumer and business survey results as well a the strategy to transfer this demand side data to local producers and processors to create new market opportunities.

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Eolfc 2013 wcm consulting - kingston and frontenac ethno-cultural research project

  1. 1. Kingston Frontenac Ethno-cultural Food Project Presentation to Eastern Ontario Local Food Conference December 3, 2013 WCM Consulting Eastern Ontario Local Food Conference December 3 2013 1
  2. 2. Presentation contents • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Background Project introduction and purpose Objectives Partners Some consumer perspectives on “local” Some commercial food buyer perspectives on “local” What is a “brand” “Local is a brand” Other implications for producers Project methodology What we wanted to know Survey outcomes Next steps Questions Eastern Ontario Local Food Conference December 3 2013 2
  3. 3. Trivia…or is it? • In the 1930s –The main meal required 2.5 hours of preparation • (usually by Mom!) • In 2008 –The main meal required 8 MINUTES of preparation (often by microwave) Eastern Ontario Local Food Conference December 3 2013 3
  4. 4. Background • Changing ethno-cultural trends in Ontario imply demand for food products that are familiar to these ethnic groups • Demographic trends and their market potential have been studied in the Greater Toronto Area • Similar shifts are occurring in other areas of the province as well, potentially resulting in significant ethno-cultural markets • 2011 census data indicates that the ethnic population in Kingston is growing • Studies have not yet explored this phenomenon in Eastern Ontario Eastern Ontario Local Food Conference December 3 2013 4
  5. 5. Objectives • Focus on ethno-cultural food specific to identified Newcomer groups • Work with the agriculture, agri-food and culinary sectors in the area • Develop market channels for products than can be produced and/or processed locally • Can food be part of a retention strategy for Newcomers in the area? • This a pilot project and, after “lessons learned”, the methods may be applied in other areas of Ontario Eastern Ontario Local Food Conference December 3 2013 5
  6. 6. Partners • Frontenac Community Futures Development Corporation • Kingston Immigration Partnership • Kingston Downtown Kingston Business Improvement Area • Ontario Ministry of Agriculture and Food/Ministry of Rural Affairs • National Farmer’s Union • Frontenac Federation of Agriculture • Kingston Economic Development Corporation Eastern Ontario Local Food Conference December 3 2013 6
  7. 7. Some consumer perspectives on “local” • When asked, most consumers will identify various characteristics of food that cause them to buy • Quality – More subjective elements, such as taste, smell, texture (or “mouth— feel”) – Clear tangibles, such as appearance and packaging – Less obvious tangibles, such as food safety and source traceability • Availability – When I want it, it must be available • Price – how much I have to pay for what I want • These define “value”, or “what I get for what I pay” – Each element of value is often subjective and very personal – When combined into an overall assessment of value then this is even more subjective Eastern Ontario Local Food Conference December 3 2013 7
  8. 8. Some consumer perspectives on “local” • “Local” often carries with it realities and perceptions: – Better quality – Fresher – Safer – Traceable to origin – Supportive of local farmer livelihoods – Supports the local economy – Encourage retention of farm land – Contributes to food sovereignty – Supports local eco-systems if farmed in a sustainable manner • Many of these perceptions are fully evident, or can be, while others may be more difficult to demonstrate – No matter, as long as the perception of value, overall, is well justified in the minds of the consumer. Eastern Ontario Local Food Conference December 3 2013 8
  9. 9. Some consumer perspectives on “local” • Reports on trends in local food have consumers showing a preference for local food – But the questions used do not always provide a full picture • “All else being equal” might apply to a portion of the respondents – Others may be prepared to pay more for local food • Some think that it should cost less, due to lower transportation costs – But they do not consider the usually smaller-scale of the producer in a local operation – This often results in lower efficiencies (higher unit costs) • Shopping on a weekend at the local Farmers’ Market does not necessarily indicate a strong preference for local food – The experience is more than simply the purchasing of food • The big unknown is whether the general consumer is willing to pay more for “local” and under what circumstances. – This is likely to vary greatly depending upon demographics, ethnocultural background, affluence, attitudes and so on Eastern Ontario Local Food Conference December 3 2013 9
  10. 10. Some commercial food buyers perspectives on “local” • Buyers of food recognise the demand for “local” • Buyers of “local” food may place the requirements in the following order of priority – Quality, well above all – Local – Consistent and convenient supply – Price • With the exception of “local”, this would apply to most buying habits, regardless of the product, food or otherwise Eastern Ontario Local Food Conference December 3 2013 10
  11. 11. What is a “brand” • A brand is not a label – A label can be created overnight – A brand will take years to develop • A brand is “reputation” – Earned, over time, through superior performance in ways deemed valuable by the customer – Demonstrates high value • Superior “What you get for what you pay” • A brand can be destroyed in one day – A noticeable failure to perform according to expectations – Potentially wide-spread effect • Companies guard brands ferociously – This may be a problem for smaller local producers – Companies may prefer known, larger suppliers, with safeguards Eastern Ontario Local Food Conference December 3 2013 11
  12. 12. “Local is a brand” • “Local” is brand that evokes impressions and expectations in the mind of a consumer – Whatever the product – No matter where it is • “Local” carries with it assumptions of the buyer/consumer regarding their own definition of “value” – Meeting those impressions, expectations and value is crucial – A significant failure to meet them can be “fatal” Eastern Ontario Local Food Conference December 3 2013 12
  13. 13. Other implications for local producers • Food safety is becoming a larger concern • “Local” is the simplest means by which to enforce the standards The characteristics of local are key, not the name itself. • “Local” is a flexible definition, more so with market radius than with producer radius • Producers must meet rigorous standards which are enforced • Achieving and maintaining the standard of local product • Traceability of the end product • Convincing chains (large and small) that local is viable Eastern Ontario Local Food Conference December 3 2013 13
  14. 14. Half Way ! Eastern Ontario Local Food Conference December 3 2013 14
  15. 15. Project methodology • Consumer surveys of local food demand in Kingston-Frontenac area – Random general population – Persons self-identified from four different ethno-cultural backgrounds • • • • East Asian South Asian Middle Eastern Latin American Eastern Ontario Local Food Conference December 3 2013 15
  16. 16. What we wanted to know (sample) • • • • • • • • • Desire to purchase ethno-cultural food that is produced, processed and sold locally Dollars spent on ethno-cultural food that is produced inside and outside of the area Ethno-cultural product demand based on market knowledge and consumer trends Demand for specific products based on customer requests/ethnicity What opportunities, if any, exist to make locally produced ethno-cultural food available in-store Changing/increasing demand for emerging and ethno-cultural produce, trees, herbs etc. Identify opportunities for ethno-cultural food based on their understanding of customer demands Challenges encountered in accessing ethno-cultural markets and how they are addressed Opportunities for growth in ethno-cultural food markets Eastern Ontario Local Food Conference December 3 2013 16
  17. 17. Outcome highlights Eastern Ontario Local Food Conference December 3 2013 17
  18. 18. Consumer survey respondents Ethnocultural group members 27% General population 73% Eastern Ontario Local Food Conference December 3 2013 18
  19. 19. Respondent ethno-cultural origins South Asian 3% Middle Eastern 38% Latin American 3% East Asian 56% Eastern Ontario Local Food Conference December 3 2013 19
  20. 20. General information Ethno-cultural groups General Population 2.6 2.7 Amount spent on food-groceries in a week Percentage spent on ethno-cultural food $132 $134 22% 15% Would prefer to buy locally 47% 58% Would prefer if produced locally 32% 38% Number of people in household (range 0%-85%) Percentage respondents purchasing 50% (almost ethno-cultural food outside local area? all in Toronto) Eastern Ontario Local Food Conference 31% (various places) December 3 2013 20
  21. 21. Price premium potential for locally available product Ethno-cultural Groups General Population Percentage of respondents buying ethnocultural foods 80% 70% Overall 10-25% appears to be the potential premium on price for locally grown ethno-cultural foods. 60% 50% This is more focused in the ethnocultural respondent groups 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 0-10% 10-25% 25-50% 50-75% 75-100% Percentage premium potential over regular prices Eastern Ontario Local Food Conference December 3 2013 21
  22. 22. Importance of purchasing characteristics Ethno-cultural Groups General Population Freshness Ethno-cultural groups hold freshness, price, and authenticity as important aspects. Price Characteristic Authenticity of product or production Availability by location Labelling information Availability by season The general population counts many characteristics as equally important. Grown regionally or locally Preservation or processing method Labelling language Grown in Ontario 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.5 4.0 4.5 5.0 Score out of 5 Eastern Ontario Local Food Conference December 3 2013 22
  23. 23. Importance of purchasing characteristics Ethno-cultural Groups General Population Purchase from local ethnic grocery store Easy to cook Characteristic Able to purchase from local farmers' market Ethno-cultural groups and the general population prefer to buy ethno-cultural food in from different types of outlet Purchase directly from a local farm Method of production Medicinal qualities Grown in country of ethno-cultural origin How to cook, suggestions for use Able to purchase from local supermarket 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.5 4.0 4.5 Score out of 5 Eastern Ontario Local Food Conference December 3 2013 23
  24. 24. Some products identified Chinese buns Canned foods Chinese chive Chinese specialty products Hot pepper paste Konnyaku (yam starch) Plantains Rice Spices Vegetable Fresh fish Meat Pickles Sauces Shiitake Vegetables Winter melon BBQ duck Chinese dates Gobo Burdock roots Oils Yellow croaker (fish) Chinese bread Chinese chestnut Sembei (rice crackers) Yams Natto (fermented soybeans) Silkie (chicken breed) Gyoza (dumpling) skins Eastern Ontario Local Food Conference December 3 2013 24
  25. 25. Some comments noted • It would be great to buy locally; would save trips to Toronto • There is a lack of real ethnic food outlets in our local area • Would like to see more products originating in various African cultures • Would like more Jewish and Middle Eastern foods available locally • I buy more for our festival meals • Local food is good for the local economy • Local supermarkets have a good selection of ethnocultural foods • Would buy more if product if produced in country of origin • I like to help local farmers Eastern Ontario Local Food Conference December 3 2013 25
  26. 26. Some comments noted • There is a demand for ethno-cultural foods • Many stores have product from my country of origin but not as fresh as local • Ontario food safety regulations means that local food will be safe • “Less travelled food” is a good thing • The food will be fresh • I would pay more for local food • Support the local economy, fresher, less pollution • Save the time and money travelling to the larger cities • Fresher and cheaper (hopefully) • Willing to pay more for better quality food Eastern Ontario Local Food Conference December 3 2013 26
  27. 27. Next steps • Determine what opportunities exist as a result of the data analysis • Determine if added knowledge/skills are required locally to develop these opportunities – Programs/funds may be able to assist here Eastern Ontario Local Food Conference December 3 2013 27
  28. 28. …and thank you for your time When completed, the formal report will be available on the Frontenac Community Futures Development Corporation web-site: www.frontenaccfdc.com/ Eastern Ontario Local Food Conference December 3 2013 28
  29. 29. Eastern Ontario Local Food Conference December 3 2013 29

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