upcea2014

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This presentation is intended for UPCEA members who are involved in helping their institutions determine whether to offer or continue to offer MOOCs. It draws on the experience of UC Irvine, an early member of Coursera, which has over ten years of experience in OpenCourseWare (OCW) and Open Educational Resources (OER). To begin, the presentation establishes the context for a full understanding of MOOCS, why they developed, what impact they have had so far, and what their effect might be on higher education and the world, but absent the hype and hyperbole that characterizes current discussions around MOOCS. The advantages and disadvantages of being involved with MOOCs and some strategic reasons to engage in MOOCs will be presented, using illustrations from the UCI experience.

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  • This presentation is intended for UPCEA members who are involved in helping their institutions determine whether to offer or continue to offer MOOCs. It draws on the experience of UC Irvine, an early member of Coursera, which has over ten years of experience in OpenCourseWare (OCW) and Open Educational Resources (OER).To begin, the presentation establishes the context for a full understanding of MOOCS, why they developed, what impact they have had so far, and what their effect might be on higher education and the world, but absent the hype and hyperbole that characterizes current discussions around MOOCS. The advantages and disadvantages of being involved with MOOCs and some strategic reasons to engage in MOOCs will be presented, using illustrations from the UCI experience.
  • While they have highlighted open education, MOOCs are generally pitched at end users (students) who use the material only for their own learning consumption. MOOCs generally are not downloadable for use by other institutions or for the creation of derivative works. To illustrate this point let’s compare UCI’s various open educational expressions with its use of MOOCs.
  • The UC Irvine Open Courseware (OCW) website is averaging just over 30,000 visits and nearly 240,000 page views per month. 45% of the visitors were from outside the U.S.
  • YouTube hosts 1,061 publicly viewable UCI video lectures based on 68 courses over a wide array of academic and professional development topics.
  • Monthly visits are approaching 100,000 and total minutes viewed exceed 800,000. Nearly half of the views originate from outside the United States. It costs about $250 per edited hour for high quality lecture video capture ($5,000 per course).
  • UC Irvine is among the leaders in offering MOOCs. We offered six early in 2013, one in summer, and six new courses in fall 2013. Over 600,000 people have signed up for our courses.
  • In fact, MOOCs in some form are here to stay and will morph into highly useful and well accepted forms of education. A quick illustration showing a “Gartner Curve” illustrates this point.
  • The effects of the hype and press coverage can be seen as we chart the overall public feeling about MOOCs. We are now clearly in the “trough of disillusionment” for MOOCs, having passed the high point sometime in early 2013. We are rapidly emerging from that trough as MOOCs are being more completely integrated into the fabric of university life. Note that the height of the positive treatment of the curve is the granting of ACE credit for five courses, two of which were offered by UCI. Also note that the lowest point on the curve is Thrun’s statement that MOOCs are not good for degree education (which is why Udacity is switching to the continuing education market, trying to go after major corporations form their training).
  • Most of the MOOC providers are turning away from undergraduate degree courses toward continuing education type courses for the business and corporate world. Udacity is the most forthright in this turn, one of many turns in its business planning development. But both Coursera and edX are exhibiting signs of serving the corporate world.
  • Across the country in most colleges and universities, however MOOCs are viewed, there is an increased institutional understanding of the role that online and open education has and can have on the world. In many cases, less innovative expressions of online and open education have gained higher acceptance as the controversy surrounding MOOCs set one end of the spectrum.
  • The public and institutional understanding of MOOCs is still based on the Stanford model, a model perpetuated by the expressions of MOOCs provided by Coursera, edX, and, to a lesser extent, Udacity. That expression has focused largely on degree-based undergraduate courses offered by top-ranked universities. Faced with data indicating that most MOOC consumers already have degrees and that often more than half of the market are not in the U.S., the understanding is beginning to shift. A close examination of MOOCs as they now exist reveals the following.
  • MOOCs do threaten some aspects of the status quo, but ultimately will not supplant traditional instruction. They can be very high quality learning pathways lacking only instructor input and attention. They are an important form of open education and MOOC “channels” should be added to OER sources. They symbolize, still, the kind of adaptability required of institutions which wish to keeppace with the learning revolution. And, as we will see soon, they do offer opportunities for massive research.
  • The average size of MOOCs will naturally decrease as this proliferates. MOOCs are open only to individual viewing and use. Unlike other OER,MOOCs generally cannot be downloaded, used, reused, or adopted for uses in university settings. By definition they are not full instructor-led online courses. Although this look into online courses and, as people seek credit for them, began to take on aspects of online courses.  MOOCs properly are teaching tools not substitutes for teaching.
  • MOOCs will shift from degree-based courses to curricula (groups of courses) designed for non-degree seeking audiences. They will form the basis for learning communities organized in a way to popular informal book clubs.
  • In crafting an institutional strategy around MOOCs there are a number of benefits that those institutions involved have already discovered. Here is a list of them. So far, however, the financial justification in hard dollars is illusive and unlikely to be realized in the near future. But the power of MOOCs generally reside in the fact that they are at the cutting edge of a number of opportunities for intuitionsto extend their reach and influence. It will be a challenge to translatethese “soft” benefits into “hard” dollars in terms of the investments that must be made in MOOCs.
  • UCI has defined four elements in its MOOC strategy. For us, at least two of the above elements must be present for us to do a MOOC. The first is obvious—the offering of free education to the public at large is a huge public service, consistent with and supportive of UCI’s public university and land grant mission. This public service is particularly visible when a specific and deserving audience is served. In UCI’s case, one of those audiences is the public school teachers of California who want to pass a qualifying exam to become a science or math teacher. The second is the opportunity to experiment with learning innovations and learning research. This is illustrated by UCI’s ongoing research in the preparation of students for gateway courses in science, including Biology 1. A third strategy involves seeking new revenue generation possibilities in the face of the threat that free courses pose to CE programs. In UCI’s case, its relatively small income from Coursera is one example as is another experiment in a Coursera MOOC course sequence, a certificate in virtual teaching. Finally, the fourth strategy involves gaining market visibility for a specific University program illustrated by UCI’s Open Chem program.
  • One example of our serving of deserving audiences is our educational resources provided to California teachers trying to pass the States CSET exams which qualify teachers to teach science and math in the high schools. Visits to the site peak just before the exam.
  • UC Irvine's video lectures for Open Chemistry on YouTube are attracting an increasing number of visitors reaching nearly 50,000 visits and 400,000 minutes watched per month.
  • upcea2014

    1. 1. Integrating MOOCs and Institutional Strategies: Why AreWe (Not) DoingThis? Presented by GaryW. Matkin, Ph.D., Dean 2014UPCEA Annual Conference, Miami, Florida March 26-28th, 2014 slideshare.net/garymatkin/upcea2014
    2. 2. Purposes of this Presentation • Establish the proper context for understanding MOOCs, what they are and are not • Provide pros and cons of being involved with MOOCs • Illustrate uses of MOOCs as institutional strategy
    3. 3. Understanding the MOOC Context: Point 1 • MOOCs are a very limited form of “open” education
    4. 4. The UCI Experience: UCI OCW Over 350,000 SiteVisits in 2013
    5. 5. The UCI Experience: UCIYouTube
    6. 6. UCI CourseYouTubeViews, Minutes Watched, and Avg. Minutes PerView 2013 YouTube views are approaching 100,000 and minutes watched are approaching 1 million per month
    7. 7. The UCI Experience: UCI MOOCs Enrollments 2013
    8. 8. Understanding the MOOC Context: Point 2 • A clear understanding of MOOCs is clouded by the hype, hyperbole, faculty reaction to, local institutional politics, and press headlines about MOOCs
    9. 9. 2 UCI courses were included
    10. 10. Understanding the MOOC Context: Point 3 • MOOCs are more likely to have a disruptive effect on continuing education than on traditional higher education
    11. 11. Understanding the MOOC Context: Point 4 • MOOCs have energized the online and open education movements
    12. 12. Understanding the MOOC Context: Point 5 • Public discussion about MOOCs has resulted in confusion about what MOOCs are, are not, and realistically might become
    13. 13. WHAT MOOCS ARE • Threats to status quo, especially continuing education • Expensive • High quality learning pathways • An important form of open education • Symbols of the learning revolution • Opportunities for massive research
    14. 14. What MOOCS are NOT • Not so massive in future • Not so open • Not online courses • Not threats to teaching • Not limited to top-ranked universities
    15. 15. WHAT MOOCS WILL BE • A standard part of higher and continuing education • The basis for low cost sharing of content • Focused on non-degree seeking, targeted audiences • Clearing houses for innovation and learning research • “Hubs” for learning communities
    16. 16. 1. Gain positive attention 2. Attract and serve students 3. Create a position for innovation readiness 4. Symbolize innovation 5. Provide opportunities for research on learning and improvement 6. Fulfill public service roles 7. Can serve deserving audiences (alumni, lay public) 8. Inform course authorship and design 9. Put instruction on the "train" The Pros & Cons of MOOCs: Pros
    17. 17. The Pros & Cons of MOOCs: Cons • MOOCs are expensive • No current rational business model (may not be sustainable) • May cause needless internal antipathy toward online education • Financial rationale unquantifiable (value of PR) • Few “organic” ties to teaching, research, public service
    18. 18. Elements of an Institutional MOOC Strategy • Public Service—Serving a deserving audience – UCI: CSET • Learning innovation and research – UCI: Pre-Bio MOOC • Revenue opportunity – UCI: Coursera andVirtualTeacher • Increased market visibility for University program – UCI: Open Chem
    19. 19. Public Service: CSET
    20. 20. Learning Innovation & Research: Pre-Bio • Coursera MOOC Enrollments: 37, 921 • UCI Freshmen enrolled: • Research questions: – How did students who “completed” the MOOC do in Bio 1? – How did their performance compare with a control group? – What level of “completion” made a difference?
    21. 21. MarketVisibility: Open Chem
    22. 22. OpenChemYouTubeViews and MinutesWatched 2013 YouTube views of Open Chem are Approaching 50,000 views and 500,000 minutes watched per month
    23. 23. WhatWillYou Do?
    24. 24. slideshare.net/garymatkin/upcea2 014 gmatkin@uci.edu, 949-824-5525

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