Gary Hopkins - gary@garyhopkins.com

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Do you need a designer who's used to juggling multiple #1 projects and somehow making it all happen? How about an expert who's comfortable acting as intermediary, explaining technical issues to management?

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Gary Hopkins - gary@garyhopkins.com

  1. 1. 215-247-5282 gary@garyhopkins.com linkedin.com/in/garyhopkinsdesign FINE WEB & PRINT PUBLICATIONS
  2. 2. DALEY ZUCKER MEILTON MINER & GINGRICH WEB SITE     2010
  3. 3. INTEGRATED TECHNOLOGY SERVICES, LLC WEB SITE     2010
  4. 4. INTEGRATED TECHNOLOGY SERVICES, LLC WEB SITE     2010
  5. 5. UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA OFFICE OF AUDIT AND COMPLIANCE WEB SITE     2004
  6. 6. UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA OFFICE OF AUDIT AND COMPLIANCE WEB SITE     2004
  7. 7. AMERICAN BOARD OF INTERNAL MEDICINE CPD RECERTIFICATION WEB SITE     2004
  8. 8. AMERICAN BOARD OF INTERNAL MEDICINE CPD RECERTIFICATION WEB SITE     2004
  9. 9. HERMAN MILLER/OFFICE PAVILION SPECTRUM WEB SITE     1999 A Message from Bob Melchionni, president Welcome to the HermanMiller/Spectrum web site. We hope you will use it to learn about the people, products and processes that have made HermanMiller/Spectrum the Delaware Valley's premier office furniture company with more than thirty years in the service business. Today, people are looking for the best utilization of office furniture. We are going through a revolution in office technology and our customers want office furniture and systems The Mission HermanMiller/ Spectrum is a furniture dealership comprised of individuals working together at their highest potential in an environment of mutual respect. We are dedicated to providing good products and superior service to meet the present and ultimate needs of each customer. The Partnerships We Form HermanMiller/Spectrum represents a much-needed alternative among office furniture dealers. Doing business today means handling lightning-fast technological advances and keeping your business agile enough for a global marketplace. In response to these complexities, office environments have become more complex, too. HermanMiller/Spectrum has responded to these changing dynamics by creating long-term partnerships with customers who know that the teams who created HermanMiller/Spectrum -- Your premiere office furniture team
  10. 10. UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA SCHOOL OF VETERINARY MEDICINE BELLWETHER ISSUE NO. 62, SEPTEMBER 2006     32 PAGES     8.5 X 11
  11. 11. Admissions 2004-2006 School of Veterinary Medicine University of Pennsylvania UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA SCHOOL OF VETERINARY MEDICINE 2004-2006 ANNUAL REPORT     32 PAGES     8.5 X 11
  12. 12. UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA SCHOOL OF VETERINARY MEDICINE 2001-2002 ANNUAL REPORT     32 PAGES     8.5 X 11
  13. 13. UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA SCHOOL OF VETERINARY MEDICINE SPRING 2004 FUTURES NEWSLETTER     8 PAGES     8.5 X 11 FUTURESPLANNED GIVING NEWSLETTER OF PENN VETERINARY MEDICINE MeetChuck& PaulT his is the story of Charles A.Gilmore,Jr. and Paul James— successful businessmen, World War II veterans, dog lovers, and philanthropists whose thought- ful planning has enhanced the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine and the Matthew J. Ryan Veterinary Hospital. “Thatdogwasthebesttherapy!” It all started in Chicago after World War II, when Chuck and Paul launched a busi- ness partnership that was to span more than 50 years. Chuck had served with the Army in both Europe and Japan (he was later recalled for active duty during the Korean War). Paul, a Navy veteran, was having a difficult time recovering from the traumas of surviving the attack on Pearl Harbor. He recalls,“One day after the war, this little stray dog followed me home from the grocery store. That dog was the best therapy! I’ve had dogs ever since.” Relocating to Philadelphia in 1950, they established Center City’s premier residen- tial real estate firm. Later, they founded two corporations together: a real estate broker- age and development company and a chain of small parking lots in west Center City. “We could park anywhere from Broad Street to the Schuykill River,” laughs Paul. “They’vealwaystreatedussowell.” Along the way, their canine friends have enriched their lives. They have always kept at least one dog, and sometimes as many as 13, including 12 pups—twice! After a friend passed away, they adopted Sprocket (pic- tured). Chuck and Paul have always relied on the Matthew J. Ryan Veterinary Hospital for the very best in companion animal care. “We want to show how much we appreciate the wonderful care we’ve received over the years. They’ve always treated us so well.” In addition to their annual gifts, Chuck and Paul have thought ahead, too: the School and Hospital are named as beneficiaries of an IRA and other estate plans. Chuck and Paul learned that designating Penn as beneficiary of a retire- ment plan can save both estate tax and income tax, so they can leave more to heirs and the charities they support. “Wewantedtostartgivingnow.” Chuck and Paul first learned about chari- table gift annuities from a friend who set one up for the Veterinary School. They like the high rates and tax-free income they receive from their gift annuities. In addition, the deductions for their charitable gifts reduced their income taxes considerably. Best of all, Chuck and Paul know their gift annuities will benefit the School and the Ryan Hospi- tal.With their gift annuities, Chuck and Paul have begun to create their legacy here. Charles A. Gilmore, Jr., and Paul James, with Sprocket. I N A U G U R A L I S S U E SPRING 2004 FUTURESPLANNED GIVING NEWSLETTER OF PENN VETERINARY MEDICINE Join us for the Groundbreaking of the Teachingand ResearchBuilding See inside
  14. 14. UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA SCHOOL OF VETERINARY MEDICINE 2004 PENN ANNUAL CONFERENCE CATALOG     32 PAGES     8.5 X 11 Penn Annual Conference 104th Thursday-Friday March11-12,2004 Adam’sMarkHotel,Philadelphia Penn Annual Conference 104th Thursday-Friday March11-12,2004 Adam’sMarkHotel,Philadelphia AdvanceregistrationclosesFriday,February27.Registernowat<http://alumni.vet.upenn.edu/pennannualconference.html>.AdvanceregistrationclosesFriday,February27.Registernowat<http://alumni.vet.upenn.edu/pennannualconference.html>.
  15. 15. UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA SCHOOL OF VETERINARY MEDICINE 2003-2004 ANNUAL REPORT     32 PAGES     8.5 X 11 A N N U A L R E P O R T 2 0 0 3 – 2 0 0 4
  16. 16. UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA SCHOOL OF VETERINARY MEDICINE 2003-2004 ANNUAL REPORT     32 PAGES     8.5 X 11
  17. 17. UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA SCHOOL OF VETERINARY MEDICINE 2002-2003 ANNUAL REPORT     24 PAGES     8.5 X 11 Annual Report 2002–2003 PennVeterinaryMedicine
  18. 18. UNIV. OF PENN. INSTITUTE FOR RESEARCH ON HIGHER EDUCATION AUGUST 2004 ISSUE OF EXEMPLARS     12 PAGES     8.5 X 11 A u g u s t 2 0 0 2 ExemplarsExemplarsPERSPECTIVES Exemplars Michigan State University Strategy Without Deep Pockets: Enhancing Institutional Capacity from Within The Problem: Increase the capacity for strategic innovation in a large, decentralized public research university with limited financial means. The Solution: Engage faculty, staff, and administrators in a mutual-interest approach to strategic innovation, working across organizational and hierarchical boundaries to achieve common purposes. Setting forth and pursuing a strategic vision for Michigan State University (MSU) is no small task. A research university with 14 degree- granting colleges, offering more than 200 programs of learning to more than 45,000 undergraduate and graduate students, Michigan State epit- omizes a complex, decentralized organization. It is also a land-grant university and a member of the Association of American Universities, committed not only to maintaining a balance between the missions of research, education, and outreach, but also to achieving international dis- tinction in each. The very extent of its reach can lead one to regard this University’s strengths and accomplishments in terms of its individual parts. When Peter McPherson became President of Michigan State in 1993, he set about to assure that the University would become more than the sum of those parts. As an outsider to higher education, he per- ceived that universities needed to change in order to become more effective and efficient. One of his first actions was to engage the MSU community in a broad, deliberative process of defining the institution’s purposes and direction. The result was two public statements: MSU’s Guiding Principles, followed later by the MSU Promise. Together these P O L I C Y
  19. 19. UNIV. OF PENN. INSTITUTE FOR RESEARCH ON HIGHER EDUCATION NOVEMBER 2003 ISSUE OF POLICY PERSPECTIVES     12 PAGES     8.5 X 11 November 2003 Volume 11 Number 2 P O L I C Y PERSPECTIVES The Knight Higher Education Collaborative Supported by the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation gravitate toward a certain limited set of majors, effec- tively distorting demand on the curriculum and poten- tially diverting resources from the departments athletes tend to avoid. Within these particular disputes are more fundamental and unresolved questions: Exactly what role does intercollegiate athletics have on college cam- puses and in the individual athlete’s overall education? In an age of increasing competitiveness and specialization, to what extent is participation in a team sport still an extra-curricular activity; and to what extent has it become the central organizing element of the student- athlete’s college years? What is the price athletics exacts—in terms of institutional expenditures, or the claims made on students’ own educational priorities? And even more particularly: Have the recruitment and admissions practices of selective colleges and universities conferred too strong an advantage on students who are recruited to participate in team sports? Through the years, these questions have been asked in a variety of contexts; in 2001 the publication of The Game of Life: College Sports and Educational Values, by James Shulman and William Bowen, helped cast them into sharper relief. This Policy Perspectives explores how competitive intercollegiate athletics affects both admission prac- tices and the nature of academic community at private col- leges and universities that practice selective admissions. It is based on a roundtable that took place in February 2003, organized by J. Douglas Toma of the University of Georgia’s Institute of Higher Education. Our roundtable included administrators, professors, student-athletes, athletics directors, directors of intercollegiate athletics conferences, and others with experience and insight in considering the role of athletics in campus communities. While the debate about that role is not new, the issue of access to the most selective baccalaureate institutions has taken on a particular prominence in current conversations. When Values Matter Intercollegiate athletics is a lens that brings into remarkable focus the relationship of insti- tutional values to daily practices. More than most issues, it has the effect of casting com- plex and ambiguous dis- putes into sharp relief. For more than a century now, spectator sports have provided colleges and universities with a host of symbols of com- mon institutional iden- tity and ambition, draw- ing together otherwise disparate and specialized populations. Many of athletics’ most spirited advocates consider the lessons of citizenship and socialization derived from the playing field to be no less important than those of the classroom. In the best sense, participation in collegiate sports becomes a hall- mark of the well-rounded student—serious, disciplined, competitive, yet equally exemplifying the virtues of good sportsmanship, team camaraderie, and institutional loyalty. In the pantheon of collegiate aspirations, athletic achievement continues to hold a special place—both for individuals and for institutions. But as sports have become more intense in every level of society, higher education institutions of all kinds have confronted the question of how well practice in fact follows precept. Within the last three years, the perennial debate about the role of athletics, particularly in highly selective institutions, has become more acute. The ques- tions in these settings center on the academic qualifica- tions and performance of recruited athletes relative to their peers, as well as the degree to which student-athletes
  20. 20. UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA SCHOOL OF VETERINARY MEDICINE 2004 OPPORTUNITY SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM BROCHURE     6 PANELS     8.5 X 14 op•por•tu•ni•ty. a possibility for advancement or progress Opportunity Scholarship Program OfficeofDevelopmentandAlumniRelations UniversityofPennsylvania SchoolofVeterinaryMedicine 3800SpruceStreet Philadelphia,PA19104-6047 Opportunity Scholarship Program Committee Charles W. Raker, V’42, Chair Jill Beech, V’72 Andrew H. Elser, V’87 Charles W. Koenig, V’57 Lori Spencer Mann, V’95 Lawrence A. Rebbecchi, Jr., V’90 Brenda Lewis Stewart, V’70 James V. Stewart, V’68 Robert W. Stewart, Sr., V’68 Marilyn B. Weber, V’75 Dori Myers, Major Gifts Officer Ashra Markowitz, Assistant Dean for Student Affairs Jeffrey Wortman, V’69, Associate Dean Opportunity Scholars are chosen based on academic achievement and financial need. The student is matched with a donor/mentor or faculty member for the entire scholarship. A donor’s interests, specialties, and location are considered when selecting the scholarship recipient. An Opportunity Scholar receives $2,500 from the same donor(s) for each of the four years of his or her veterinary education. The scholarship may be named for the donor or someone the donor wishes to honor or memorialize. OpportunityScholarshipProgram—ExploringPossibility Icouldnothavemadeit withoutthesupportofmy OpportunityScholarship sponsor.Knowingthat peoplecanbesogenerous andgivinghasmademe proudtobehereatPenn. HopefullyIwillbeableto assistavetstudentinthe futureandfeelthatIhave givenbackinyourhonor.” VivianOrita,V’04 “
  21. 21. UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA SCHOOL OF VETERINARY MEDICINE 2006 CENTER FOR THE INTERACTION OF ANIMALS AND SOCIETY BROCHURE     8 PANELS     8.5 X 14 Behavioral Development in Companion Dogs Behavioral problems are the largest single cause of canine abandonment, relinquishment to shelters, and premature euthanasia in the U.S. The CIAS is investigating behavioral problems in pet dogs and how early experience may contribute to their development. Health and Behavior Follow-Up in 9/11 Search-and-Rescue Dogs In collaboration with other Penn faculty and researchers, the CIAS is conducting a study of the long-term behavioral effects of deployment at the World Trade Center and Pentagon sites on a population of search-and-rescue dogs. Measuring Behavior in Dogs The CIAS has developed a questionnaire (C-BARQ) that enables dog owners and handlers to accurately evaluate the temperament and behavior of their dogs in a standardized way. The C-BARQ has been adopted as a routine behavioral screen by several national guide and service dog organizations, as well as attracting international interest from similar agencies around the world. The CIAS is also working to make the C-BARQ available on-line for the benefit of individual dog owners. Understanding Urban Animal Cruelty The Center seeks to understand the connection between animal abuse and socioeconomic, demographic, and contextual factors. Links between animal abuse and other forms of criminal behavior are also explored. Animal-Assisted Interventions and Mental Health Social workers, psychologists, and other healthcare professionals now incorporate animal-assisted therapy as a treatment in many healthcare and educational settings. Today, animals are found in hospitals, rehabilitation centers, schools, long-term care facilities, and other sites. These animals greatly contribute to the physical, social, and psychological well-being of people. The Center explores the practice of animal-assisted interventions in treating people with mental-health diagnoses. In 2004, the CIAS co-sponsored a major interdisciplinary conference,“Can Animals Help Humans Heal? Animal-Assisted Interventions in Adolescent Mental Health,” which addressed the therapeutic effects of animals on at-risk youth and those with various mental-health diagnoses. Helping Animals and People since 1979 For more information, or if you would like to support the work of the Center, please contact: James A. Serpell, Ph.D. Director, CIAS Matthew J. Ryan Veterinary Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania 3900 Delancey Street Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6010 cias@lists.vet.upenn.edu http://www.vet.upenn.edu/research/centers/cias/index.html This brochure was generously funded by The Animal Rescue League of Philadelphia. Center for the Interaction of Animals and Society PennVeterinaryMedicine PennVeterinaryMedicine Centerforthe Interactionof AnimalsandSociety MatthewJ.RyanVeterinaryHospital oftheUniversityofPennsylvania 3900DelanceyStreet Philadelphia,Pennsylvania19104-6010
  22. 22. UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA SCHOOL OF VETERINARY MEDICINE BELLWETHER ISSUE 60, FALL 2004     32 PAGES     8.5 X 11
  23. 23. UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA SCHOOL OF VETERINARY MEDICINE BELLWETHER ISSUE 60, FALL 2004     32 PAGES     8.5 X 11
  24. 24. UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA SCHOOL OF VETERINARY MEDICINE 2004 PLANNED GIVING AD     8.5 X 11
  25. 25. UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA SCHOOL OF VETERINARY MEDICINE 2005 PENNSYLVANIA FARM SHOW GENERAL INFORMATION FLYER     2 PAGES     11 X 17
  26. 26. UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA SCHOOL OF VETERINARY MEDICINE 2004 PLANNED GIVING CARD     2 SIDES     5.5 X 8.5
  27. 27. PHILADELPHIA UNIVERSITY 2007 TIPS FROM A TOUR GUIDE (INFORMAL INTRO TO THE UNIVERSITY)     4 PANELS     5.5 X 8.5
  28. 28. UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA SCHOOL OF VETERINARY MEDICINE 2005 PLANNED GIVING AD, 4-COLOR     8.5 X 11
  29. 29. UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA SCHOOL OF VETERINARY MEDICINE 2006 OPPORTUNITY SCHOLARSHIP BROCHURE     8 PANELS     8.5 X 14
  30. 30. UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA SCHOOL OF VETERINARY MEDICINE 2006 BACKER FOR LUCITE BROCHURE HOLDER     24 PAGES     11 X 14
  31. 31. UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA DENTAL CARE NETWORK SOUND BITES     1997     4 PAGES     11 X 17 The Penn Dental Center at Mayfair has officially opened its doors. This new office is the fourth facility in the growing Penn Dental Care Network, and its opening means that the Penn Faculty Practice can now serve res- idents of Northeast Philadelphia right in their own neighborhood. The new Dental Center is part of a larger health care complex that includes the Mayfair Family Practice of the University of Pennsylvania Health System’s Clinical Care Associates network. The medical and dental practices will share an entrance and spacious reception room that includes a children’s play area. An open house will be held on Saturday, October 25, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. to allow visitors to tour the facility. The Penn Dental Center at Mayfair is headed by Dr. Thomas W. Therrien. Dr. Therrien, who practices general dentistry, has been a member of the Penn Faculty Practice since 1990. A graduate of the University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine, Dr. Therrien is enthusiastic about the new facility and notes that he is “looking forward to see- ing many of my old patients, along with many new ones” there. The Mayfair office will also be staffed by Dr. Mohamad Itani (see “New Faces”). Dr. Raymond Fonseca, Dean of the School of Dental Medicine and an oral surgeon with the Penn Faculty Practice, says that the main reason for opening this new office is to improve service to the large number of University and Health System employees who live in the Northeast. Dr. Fonseca notes, “James Michener once remarked that whenever he trav- eled abroad, he always looked for dentists who were graduates of Penn because he knew he could count on getting quality care from them. Now we’re bringing the faculty who train those dentists—the ones that Michener would look for—out to neighborhoods. We’re mak- ing it easy for anyone who wants Penn quality to find it.” Photo:MarkGarvin D E N T A L H E A L T H N E W S F O R P F P P L A N S U B S C R I B E R SFall 1997 NETWORK BRINGS PENN DENTAL CARE TO NORTHEAST PHILADELPHIA Enjoy coffee, doughnuts, and a tour of our facilities on Saturday, October 25, from 9 AM to 1 PM, at the Penn Dental Centers at Bryn Mawr, Mayfair, and Overbrook. For more information call (215) 573-7243 or check the Penn Faculty Practice Web site on the School of Dental Medicine home page (http://www.dental.upenn.edu). THE FIRST TOOTH IS A DEVELOPMENTAL MILE- STONE THAT NEW PAR- ENTS EAGERLY ANTICI- PATE. BUT THE FIRST TOOTH IS JUST THE START OF A PROCESS THAT GOES ON FOR 18 YEARS OR MORE. THROUGHOUT THE YEARS WHEN THE TEETH AND JAWS ARE DEVELOPING, YOU, YOUR CHILD, AND YOUR DENTIST CAN FORM A WINNING TEAM TO ENSURE THAT YOUR CHILD WILL ENJOY THE BENEFITS OF A HEALTHY MOUTH, WELL INTO ADULTHOOD. KEEPING AN EYE ON YOUR KIDS' T E E T H BABYING THOSE BABY TEETH Your child’s first teeth, known as deciduous teeth, will affect his or her development on many levels. By giving your child the ability to chew properly, teeth are an important part of proper nutrition. Healthy deciduous teeth play a key role in ensuring proper growth and development of the jaw, as well as in the eruption of the permanent teeth that will eventually replace them. Those first teeth also affect your child’s ability to learn to speak, and by contributing to a healthy appearance, teeth can impact on his or her social development. And, as Director of the Penn Faculty Practice Dr. Robert Tisot points out, “Deciduous teeth can be in the mouth until a child is 13. There are many situations where permanent teeth don’t last that long.” So there are plenty of reasons for building good oral hygiene practices in children, beginning with that first tooth—and sometimes even before. Taking good care of your child’s teeth starts at home. Dentists sometimes advise Continued on page 3 See page 4 for additional information on the Penn Dental Center at Mayfair. ✯✯✯✯ OPEN HOUSE Dental Care Network University of Pennsylvania SusanBraccia
  32. 32. PHILADELPHIA UNIVERSITY 2006 KANBAR CAMPUS CENTER FUNDRAISING BROCHURE     8 PAGES     8.5 X 11
  33. 33. PHILADELPHIA UNIVERSITY 2006 KANBAR CAMPUS CENTER FUNDRAISING BROCHURE     8 PAGES     8.5 X 11
  34. 34. PHILADELPHIA UNIVERSITY 2006 KANBAR CAMPUS CENTER FUNDRAISING BROCHURE     8 PAGES     8.5 X 11
  35. 35. UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA SCHOOL OF VETERINARY MEDICINE 2006 HOLIDAY CARD     4 PANELS     5.5 X 8.5
  36. 36. 215-247-5282 gary@garyhopkins.com linkedin.com/in/garyhopkinsdesign FINE WEB & PRINT PUBLICATIONS

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