So Can I Use This or Not

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Short overview of copyright, fair use, and Creative Commons.

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  • Ignorance: Countries have different regulations regarding the ownership of ideas. Some cultures encourage students to borrow freely from sources because it’s a form of respect or flattery to copy the expert.Also, students often don’t know how to cite properly (how to paraphrase, and when and how to include attribution).This is why a statement on plagiarism and academic honesty should be placed in the syllabus and discussed in class. Instructional resources for learning to cite properly should also be provided.Laziness: Students may feel that better work or better arguments have already been written on this topic, so why re-create the work? It’s much easier to paraphrase the whole paper. Also, they may have forgotten to include the author and pages in their notes, or they may think that they had paraphrased a certain section when, in fact, they had directly quoted the author.Time Management: Some of this may be intentional procrastination, but some may simply be due to the fact that the student did not think the research for the assignment would take that long. This is where an assignment delivered in a sequential manner would be helpful.Lack of Confidence: Students may doubt their ability to synthesize information and to express their own critical analysis. In this case, they should be encouraged to express their own ideas, and that you don’t expect them to be as brilliant as the experts.Lack of Research Skills: Students may have too broad or too narrow of a topic to start with. They also may not know how to use the library resources to effectively find information on their topic. This can be addressed by either showing the class how to access the resources and search for information yourself, or with the help of a librarian, or by encouraging the students to meet with their liaison librarian for research assistance. That’s why we’re here!
  • So Can I Use This or Not

    1. 1. So Can I Use This Or Not?<br />Gary S. Atwood<br />PHED 635March 29, 2011<br />
    2. 2. Before we get started…<br />
    3. 3. Copyright<br />Article 1, Section 8<br />“To promote the Progress of Science and useful Arts, by securing for limited times to Authors and Inventors the exclusive right to their respective Writing and Discoveries.”<br />
    4. 4. Exclusive Rights<br />To reproduce (copy)<br />To create derivative works of the original work<br />To sell, lease, or rent copies of the work to the public<br />To perform the work publicly<br />To display the work publicly<br />
    5. 5. How Long?!<br />1790 – 14 years<br />1831 – 28 years<br />1976 – Life of the author + 50 years<br />1998 – Life of the author + 70 years<br />
    6. 6. Exceptions<br />Ideas, facts & data<br />Things created by the <br />Things in the public domain<br />
    7. 7. What is Plagiarism?<br />To steal and pass off (the ideas or words of another) as one’s own<br />To use (another’s production) without crediting the source<br />To commit literary theft<br />To present as new and original an idea or product derived from an existing source<br />Plagiarize. (2009). In Merriam-Webster Online DictionaryRetrieved October 20, 2009, from http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/plagiarize<br />
    8. 8. Why do students plagiarize?<br />Ignorance<br />Cultural differences about content ownership<br />Confused about when and how to cite information<br />Laziness<br />Why re-create the wheel?<br />Sloppy note-taking<br />Poor time management<br />Procrastination leads to desperation!<br />Lack of confidence<br />Doubt their own ability to interpret and analyze material<br />Lack of research skills<br />Need help choosing an appropriate topic and search terms<br />Need help searching the library catalogs and databases<br />
    9. 9. Is It<br />Plagiarism?<br />
    10. 10. Question One<br />You want to use a song from one of your CDs in a project. You look everywhere, but there is no copyright symbol © on the CD or the case. This means that the music isn’t copyrighted. <br />True<br />False<br />
    11. 11. Question One<br />You want to use a song from one of your CDs in a project. You look everywhere, but there is no copyright symbol © on the CD or the case. This means that the music isn’t copyrighted. <br />True<br />False<br />
    12. 12. Question Two<br />You have been asked to make a tutorial about how to create a blog. During the course of your research, you find a tutorial that is perfect so you decide to use that. This is OK to do as long as you cite it.<br />True<br />False<br />
    13. 13. Question Two<br />You have been asked to make a tutorial about how to create a blog. During the course of your research, you find a tutorial that is perfect so you decide to use that. This is OK to do as long as you cite it.<br />True<br />False<br />
    14. 14. Tie Breaker<br />You shoot some video of your friends (with their permission) at a party for a project you are working on about drunk driving. There are two songs from the radio playing on the video. It’s still OK to use this video because you shot it and therefore own the copyright.<br />True<br />False<br />
    15. 15. Tie Breaker<br />You shoot some video of your friends (with their permission) at a party for a project you are working on about drunk driving. There are two songs from the radio playing on the video. It’s still OK to use this video because you shot it and therefore own the copyright.<br />True<br />False<br />
    16. 16. Thanks for playing!<br />
    17. 17. Fair Use<br />
    18. 18. Fair Use<br />Possible exceptions include:<br />Criticism<br />Comment<br />News reporting<br />Teaching<br />Scholarship<br />Research<br />Parody<br />
    19. 19. 4 Factors<br />
    20. 20. So You Got All of That, Right?<br />
    21. 21. “Opposite” of copyright<br />Content creators get to decide who and how people can use their work<br />CC Licenses<br />Get in on the action<br />For example…<br />
    22. 22. Do It Yourself<br />

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