Working Together to Save Arctic Species Importance of Partnerships in Engaging Canadians EECOM 2011
National Parks in Nunavut Quttinirpaaq National Park of Canada Sirmilik National Park of Canada Auyuittuq National Park of...
2010 – the International  Year of Biodiversity <ul><li>IUCN – Commission on Education and Communication </li></ul><ul><li>...
OurArctic.ca – Project Partners <ul><li>CAZA  –  Canadian Association of Zoos  and Aquariums </li></ul><ul><li>CWF  –  Can...
<ul><li>National Office of Parks Canada has a Memorandum of Understanding with Canadian Association of Zoos and Aquariums ...
Nunavut – Canada’s newest Territory <ul><li>Created in 1999 </li></ul><ul><li>Inuit make up 85% of the population </li></u...
Nunavut Land Claims Agreement <ul><li>Creation of Nunavut </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Nunavummiut rights are protected </li></ul...
How does it work? <ul><li>Every National Park in Nunavut is co-managed through board members and Parks Canada </li></ul><u...
Communicating (between) cultures <ul><li>Arctic Biodiversity  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Seen as alive and thriving by many Inu...
Communicating cultures - Biodiversity <ul><li>Studying it in the south </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Qaluunaat  base understanding...
Biodiversity Illustrated <ul><li>Baffin Island – is the size of ....... </li></ul><ul><ul><li>more than 360 plant species ...
Beginning the conversation <ul><li>Weekly conference calls – CAZA and all its partners  </li></ul><ul><li>CAZA focused on ...
Extending the conversation <ul><li>While remaining engaged in discussions with its primary partner – CAZA – Parks Canada’s...
Extending the conversation <ul><li>Reporting back to JPMC and UPMC </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Input sought from committees </li...
Engaging partners further <ul><li>CAZA – a continuing relationship, connecting Parks Canada to some of its members: </li><...
Importance, to NFU, in  maintaining CAZA relationships <ul><li>Reaching urban audiences through southern partners – a key ...
Building networks and creating opportunity <ul><li>CAZA - a model for development of other organizational relationships – ...
2012 Opportunity for You <ul><li>Parks Canada in Nunavut has been working closely with Canadian Wildlife Federation in bri...
Engaging Partners in Nunavut <ul><li>Partnership is required under Inuit Impact Benefit Agreement </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Qi...
Engaging Partners in Nunavut <ul><li>Within Federal Organizations </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Hiring an Intern person </li></ul>...
Parks Canada in Nunavut <ul><li>How might you assist Parks Canada in Nunavut in developing an appreciation and understandi...
Staying Connected Garry Enns External Relations Manager, Parks Canada (867) 975 4660 [email_address]
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Working Together to Save Arctic Species: Recognizing the Importance of Partnerships in Engaging Canadians

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Parks Canada entered into a partnership with the Canadian Association of Zoos and Aquariums (CAZA) in the
development of a campaign in 2011 for UNESCO's International Year of Biodiversity. The focus of the CAZA
campaign was biodiversity at risk in the Arctic. Key to the campaign was the development of an educational toolkit
and a website presence, www.OurArctic.ca. Campaign literature was provided to all CAZA members, reaching
audiences across Canada. This presentation will outline the planning, development and the implementation of the
campaign. It will describe CAZA's lead role and the participation of partners including Parks Canada, Canadian
Wildlife Federation, and Polar Bears International. Participants in this session will learn the value of engaging
partners to extend the potential and reach of an educational initiative; they will learn about the Parks Canada
approach in building stakeholder and partner relations; and they will be given an opportunity to apply lessons learned
by the partners in the OurArctic campaign to relationship building their organizations and agencies are undertaking.
This presentation also will describe the campaign and its goal to build awareness of Canada's Arctic and its
biodiversity and its efforts to get Canadians to work together to save Arctic species. And the session will describe
how this campaign has helped develop stronger working relationships among all participating partners. Our Arctic.
Our Life.

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  • Briefly comment on the assumptions around the terms in the title
  • Working Together to Save Arctic Species: Recognizing the Importance of Partnerships in Engaging Canadians

    1. 1. Working Together to Save Arctic Species Importance of Partnerships in Engaging Canadians EECOM 2011
    2. 2. National Parks in Nunavut Quttinirpaaq National Park of Canada Sirmilik National Park of Canada Auyuittuq National Park of Canada Ukkusiksalik National Park of Canada
    3. 3. 2010 – the International Year of Biodiversity <ul><li>IUCN – Commission on Education and Communication </li></ul><ul><li>Secretariat of the Convention on Biological Diversity </li></ul><ul><li>National Biodiversity Strategies and Action Plans are mandated through Article 6 of the Convention on Biological Diversity </li></ul>
    4. 4. OurArctic.ca – Project Partners <ul><li>CAZA – Canadian Association of Zoos and Aquariums </li></ul><ul><li>CWF – Canadian Wildlife Federation </li></ul><ul><li>Polar Bears International </li></ul><ul><li>Parks Canada Agency – including Nunavut Field Unit (NFU) </li></ul>
    5. 5. <ul><li>National Office of Parks Canada has a Memorandum of Understanding with Canadian Association of Zoos and Aquariums </li></ul><ul><li>Also has agreements with other zoos and aquariums on case-by-case basis </li></ul>
    6. 6. Nunavut – Canada’s newest Territory <ul><li>Created in 1999 </li></ul><ul><li>Inuit make up 85% of the population </li></ul><ul><li>Inuktitut –Inuit language, widely spoken </li></ul><ul><li>Nunavut’s economy includes traditional Inuit harvesting activities </li></ul><ul><li>Inuit seek to sustain traditional lifestyle - through Nunavut Land Claims Agreement and Inuit Impact Benefit Agreements </li></ul>
    7. 7. Nunavut Land Claims Agreement <ul><li>Creation of Nunavut </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Nunavummiut rights are protected </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Inuit Impact Benefit Agreement created for organizations in Nunavut </li></ul><ul><ul><li>This ensures Nunavummiut receives benefits from other organizations </li></ul></ul>
    8. 8. How does it work? <ul><li>Every National Park in Nunavut is co-managed through board members and Parks Canada </li></ul><ul><li>Board members are appointed by federal government and Inuit Organizations in Nunavut </li></ul><ul><li>Nunavut Field Unit needs their approval and input in new and existing projects </li></ul><ul><li>Comprise of community members who usually reports back to the local community </li></ul><ul><li>Board members are involved in community meetings, announcements and educational activities </li></ul>
    9. 9. Communicating (between) cultures <ul><li>Arctic Biodiversity </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Seen as alive and thriving by many Inuit in Nunavut </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Seen as threatened and at risk by southern Canadians </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Protecting Life </li></ul>
    10. 10. Communicating cultures - Biodiversity <ul><li>Studying it in the south </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Qaluunaat base understanding on information received and knowledge assumed </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Living it in the Arctic </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Inuit (who are close to the land) understand based on experience and on first hand evidence </li></ul></ul>
    11. 11. Biodiversity Illustrated <ul><li>Baffin Island – is the size of ....... </li></ul><ul><ul><li>more than 360 plant species identified on this island </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>More than 60 insects known to exist </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Extremely diverse marine life – from the kelp and other vegetation right up to the polar bear </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Polar bear is a marine mammal </li></ul></ul>
    12. 12. Beginning the conversation <ul><li>Weekly conference calls – CAZA and all its partners </li></ul><ul><li>CAZA focused on its campaign </li></ul><ul><li>Parks Canada providing the Nunavut/Arctic perspective </li></ul>
    13. 13. Extending the conversation <ul><li>While remaining engaged in discussions with its primary partner – CAZA – Parks Canada’s Nunavut Field Unit extended the conversation to include its Joint Park Management Committees (JPMC and UPMC) and to include individual parks and zoos </li></ul>
    14. 14. Extending the conversation <ul><li>Reporting back to JPMC and UPMC </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Input sought from committees </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Concerns raised by Inuit committee members </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>CAZA campaign objectives shared </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Parks Canada’s interests explained: to develop a public awareness and understanding of Canada’s National Parks in three key target audiences: urban, new Canadians, and youth </li></ul></ul>
    15. 15. Engaging partners further <ul><li>CAZA – a continuing relationship, connecting Parks Canada to some of its members: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Vancouver Aquarium - and its Arctic Exhibit </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Toronto Zoo – an Arctic exhibit </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Assiniboine Park Zoo – re-developing its Polar Bear exhibits </li></ul></ul>
    16. 16. Importance, to NFU, in maintaining CAZA relationships <ul><li>Reaching urban audiences through southern partners – a key strategy when resources and budgets are limited </li></ul><ul><li>Create opportunities for CAZA members – e.g. Connecting Vancouver Aquarium to Arctic College students in Pond Inlet; assist in development of messages and approaches </li></ul>
    17. 17. Building networks and creating opportunity <ul><li>CAZA - a model for development of other organizational relationships – for example, perhaps a stronger connection to EECOM? </li></ul><ul><li>Network model relevant in the north as well – Environmental Educators North –www.eenorth.com </li></ul>
    18. 18. 2012 Opportunity for You <ul><li>Parks Canada in Nunavut has been working closely with Canadian Wildlife Federation in bringing its 2011 Summer Learning Institute to Nunavut </li></ul><ul><li>Parks Canada hopes/plans to follow this up with a 2012 Summer Institute for educators, seeking partners in Nunavut and beyond – hope to see you then! </li></ul>
    19. 19. Engaging Partners in Nunavut <ul><li>Partnership is required under Inuit Impact Benefit Agreement </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Qikiqtaani Inuit Organization– participates in the Parks Canada interview process </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Inuit Heritage Trust- co-teaching their courses </li></ul></ul>
    20. 20. Engaging Partners in Nunavut <ul><li>Within Federal Organizations </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Hiring an Intern person </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Workshops- Species at Risk Workshop </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Assignment positions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Federal council </li></ul></ul>
    21. 21. Parks Canada in Nunavut <ul><li>How might you assist Parks Canada in Nunavut in developing an appreciation and understanding of Canada’s Arctic parks: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Canada’s youth? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Newcomers to Canada? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Citizens of Canada’s cities? – esp.MTV </li></ul></ul>
    22. 22. Staying Connected Garry Enns External Relations Manager, Parks Canada (867) 975 4660 [email_address]

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