Final report- stirling

8,159 views

Published on

Published in: Education

Final report- stirling

  1. 1.  TEAM 04      SOLAR AND WASTE HEAT POWERED STIRLING ENGINE     FINAL REPORT  “The Little Engine that Could… and Did!”  The goal of team 04 was to design and build a working Stirling engine suitable  for classroom demonstration. As an added challenge the group is planning to  have the engine run entirely from solar energy as well as other heat sources.  Andrew McMurray  B00406524    Alex Morash  B00410812    Bryan Neary  B00401625     Kristian Richards            Submission Date:   April 9th    B00411178            Submitted To:   Dr. Militzer                       Dr. Groulx    
  2. 2. TABLE OF CONTENTS LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS  ............................................................................................................................... iv  .LIST OF TABLES .............................................................................................................................................. v ABSTRACT ..................................................................................................................................................... vi 1.  INTRODUCTION ..................................................................................................................................... 1 2.  BACKGROUND ....................................................................................................................................... 2  2.1.  Ideal Stirling Engine Cycle ............................................................................................................. 2  2.2.  Real Stirling Engine Cycle .............................................................................................................. 3 3.  DESIGN REQUIREMENTS ....................................................................................................................... 6 4.  DESIGN SELECTION  ............................................................................................................................... 7  . 4.1.  Rotary Stirling Engine .................................................................................................................... 8  4.2.  Gamma Stirling Engine .................................................................................................................. 8  4.3.  Alpha Stirling Engine ‐ 90° Arrangement ...................................................................................... 9 5.  COMPONENT DESIGN, FABRICATION AND BUILD PROCESS ............................................................... 10  5.1.  Frame .......................................................................................................................................... 10  5.2.  Cylinders and Cylinder Heads ..................................................................................................... 11  5.3.  Pistons ......................................................................................................................................... 12  5.4.  Cranks  ......................................................................................................................................... 12  . 5.5.  Flywheel and Collars ................................................................................................................... 13  5.6.  Piston Rods and Brass Connection Fittings ................................................................................. 14  5.7.  Fresnel Spot Lens ........................................................................................................................ 14 6.  DESIGN ANALYSIS AND REVISED CALCULATIONS ............................................................................... 16  6.1.  Schmidt Analysis of Ideal Isothermal Model  .............................................................................. 16  . 6.2.  Fin Heat Transfer ......................................................................................................................... 18 7.  INITIAL TESTING .................................................................................................................................. 19  7.1.  Testing Observations................................................................................................................... 19  7.2.  Design Solutions .......................................................................................................................... 20 8.  DESIGN REFINEMENTS & PERFORMANCE IMPROVEMENTS .............................................................. 21  8.1.  Design Refinements .................................................................................................................... 21  8.1.1.  Frame Heat Dissipation ....................................................................................................... 21  8.1.2.  Compression Reduction ...................................................................................................... 22  8.1.3.  Transfer Tube ...................................................................................................................... 23  8.2.  PERFORMANCE IMPROVEMENTS ............................................................................................... 24  ii  
  3. 3. 8.2.1.  Internal Fins ........................................................................................................................ 24  8.2.2.  Regenerator ........................................................................................................................ 25 9.  Testing and Troubleshooting .............................................................................................................. 27  9.1.  Fresnel Lens Testing .................................................................................................................... 27  9.1.1.  Test #1 ‐ General Testing Results ‐ January 23rd (2 pm) ...................................................... 27  9.1.2.  Test #2‐ Temperature Measurements ‐ April 1st (12:40 to 1:10 pm)  ................................. 28  . 9.1.3.  Test #3 ‐ Solar Energy Input to Gamma ‘Windmill’ Stirling Engine ‐ April 1st ..................... 30  9.2.  Iterative Testing and Troubleshooting Procedure ...................................................................... 30  9.3.  Temperature Data Acquisition .................................................................................................... 33  9.3.1.  Thermocouples ................................................................................................................... 33  9.3.2.  Benchtop Digital Display ..................................................................................................... 34  9.3.3.  Thermocouple arrangement ............................................................................................... 35  9.4.  Stirling Engine Optimization........................................................................................................ 35  9.4.1.  Test #1 ‐ March 30th, 2009 .................................................................................................. 36  9.4.2.  Test #2 ‐ April 1st, 2009 ....................................................................................................... 37  9.4.3.  Test #3 ‐ Run A ‐ April 4th, 2009 .......................................................................................... 39  9.4.4.  Test #3 ‐ Run B ‐ April 4th, 2009 ........................................................................................... 42  9.4.5.  Test #3 ‐ Run C ‐ April 4th, 2009 ........................................................................................... 43  9.5.  Repeatability and Comparison to Theory ................................................................................... 44 10.  BUDGET ............................................................................................................................................... 45 11.  CONCLUSION ....................................................................................................................................... 46  11.1.  Design Requirements Fulfillment ............................................................................................ 46  11.2.  Optimal System Operating Condition ..................................................................................... 47 12.  REFERENCES ........................................................................................................................................ 48  APPENDIX A – Gantt Chart APPENDIX B – Ideal Isothermal Analysis APPENDIX C – Heat Transfer Calculations APPENDIX D – Engineering Drawings  iii  
  4. 4.  LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS Figure 1 ‐ Solar Energy Project Proposal of Solar Array sited in California Mojave Desert using SunCatcherTM Technologies from SES Stirling Energy Systems ..................................................................... 1 Figure 2 ‐ Ideal Stirling Cycle P‐v and T‐s Diagrams ...................................................................................... 2 Figure 3 ‐ Real Stirling Cycle P‐v Diagram Approximation ............................................................................ 4 Figure 4 ‐ Rotary Stirling Engine .................................................................................................................... 8 Figure 5 ‐ Gamma Stirling Engine .................................................................................................................. 9 Figure 6 ‐ Alpha Stirling Engine – 90° Arrangement ..................................................................................... 9 Figure 7 ‐ Final Concept to Build Comparison ............................................................................................. 10 Figure 8 ‐ Assembled Frame and New Bearing Seat ................................................................................... 11 Figure 9 ‐ Hot and Cold Cylinders and Cylinder Heads ............................................................................... 12 Figure 10 ‐ Piston Manufacturing and Final Product .................................................................................. 12 Figure 11 ‐ Crank Design Showing Force Couple and Stroke Length .......................................................... 13 Figure 12 ‐ Stirling Cycle Flywheel Dependance ......................................................................................... 14 Figure 13 ‐ Brass Fittings and Connecting Rods .......................................................................................... 14 Figure 14 ‐ Fresnel Lens and Frame ............................................................................................................ 15 Figure 15 ‐ Simplified Isothermal Alpha Stirling Engine .............................................................................. 16 Figure 16 ‐ Sinusoidal Volume Dependence on Crank Angle ...................................................................... 17 Figure 17 ‐ Heat Transfer and Fin Efficiency ............................................................................................... 18 Figure 18 ‐ Initial Testing Setup .................................................................................................................. 19 Figure 19 ‐ Heat Damage to Temporary Transfer Tube .............................................................................. 20 Figure 20 ‐ Hot Cylinder Insulation ............................................................................................................. 21 Figure 21 ‐ Thermal Image .......................................................................................................................... 22 Figure 22 ‐ Stroke Length Reduction  .......................................................................................................... 23  .Figure 23 ‐ Heat Damaged Transfer Tube ................................................................................................... 23 Figure 24 ‐ Steel Transfer Tube ................................................................................................................... 24 Figure 25 ‐ Internal Fins Fabrication Process .............................................................................................. 25 Figure 26 ‐ Internal Fin Placement .............................................................................................................. 25 Figure 27 ‐ Regenerator Components  ........................................................................................................ 26  .Figure 28 ‐ Installed Regenerator with Ice Water Bath .............................................................................. 26 Figure 29 ‐ Fresnel Lens and Infrared Thermometer Readings .................................................................. 27 Figure 30 ‐ Various Objects Held under the Fresnel Lens ........................................................................... 28 Figure 32 ‐ Temperature Increase of Steel Stock vs. Time  ......................................................................... 29  .Figure 31 ‐ Cylindrical Steel Object ............................................................................................................. 29 Figure 33 ‐ Gamma Windmill Stirling Engine ............................................................................................ 30 Figure 34 ‐ Surface Thermocouple .............................................................................................................. 33 Figure 35 ‐ Probe Thermocouple Setup ...................................................................................................... 34 Figure 36 ‐ Omega MDSSi8 Digital Thermometer ....................................................................................... 34 Figure 37 ‐ Thermocouple Setup  ................................................................................................................ 35  .Figure 38 ‐ Optimization Test #1 Setup ...................................................................................................... 36 Figure 39 ‐ Optimization Test #2 Setup with Regenerator ......................................................................... 37  iv  
  5. 5. Figure 40 ‐ Optimization Test #2 Hot Cylinder Temperatures .................................................................... 38 Figure 41 ‐ Optimization Test #2 Cold Cylinder Temperatures ................................................................... 38 Figure 42 ‐ Optimization Test #2 Clamp and Regenerator Temperatures .................................................. 39 Figure 43 ‐ Optimization Test #3 ‐ Run A ‐ Hot Cylinder Temperatures ..................................................... 40 Figure 44 ‐ Optimization Test #3 ‐ Run A ‐ Cold Cylinder Temperatures .................................................... 40 Figure 45 ‐ Optimization Test #3 ‐ Run A ‐ Clamp and Regen Temperatures ............................................. 41 Figure 46 ‐ Optimization Test #3 ‐ Run A ‐ RPM and Power ....................................................................... 42 Figure 47 ‐ Optimization Test #3 ‐ Run B ‐ RPM and Power ....................................................................... 43 Figure 48 ‐ Schmidt Analysis Results for December Design .......................................................................... 4 Figure 49 ‐ Schmidt Analysis Results for January Revised Design ................................................................. 5 Figure 50 ‐ Schmidt Analysis Results Using Actual Results from April Optimizations .................................. 5  LIST OF TABLES Table 1 : Ideal Stirling Cycle Process Summary ............................................................................................. 3 Table 2 : Design Requirements ..................................................................................................................... 6 Table 3 : Design Selection Matrix  ................................................................................................................. 7  .Table 4 : Results of Schmidt Analysis of Ideal Isothermal Model ............................................................... 17 Table 5 : Troubleshooting Parameters ........................................................................................................ 31 Table 6 : Successive Iterative Testing Process ............................................................................................ 32 Table 7 : Optimization Test#1 Results  ........................................................................................................ 36  .Table 8 : Theory and Testing Results .......................................................................................................... 44 Table 9 : Team 04 Budget ........................................................................................................................... 45 Table 10 : Design Requirement Status ........................................................................................................ 46 Table 11 : Optimal Engine Conditions ......................................................................................................... 47   v  
  6. 6. ABSTRACT Team 4 was responsible for designing and delivering a working solar powered Stirling engine to the Dalhousie Mechanical Engineering Department in April 2009.  A Stirling engine is the closest real engine to approximate the theoretical Carnot cycle engine and consists of rapidly heating and cooling a gas within a piston/cylinder device.  The gas is fully contained meaning there is no exhaust or intake and therefore the Stirling engine is considered an external combustion engine as the heat is applied externally.  Team 4 intended to utilize the power of the sun to provide the necessary energy to the system instead of burning conventional fuels.  The main purpose of the project served to promote the use of Stirling engines in ‘green energy’ applications.  Due to the high theoretical efficiencies of Stirling engines they are a prime candidate for future solar energy generation research.  Solar powered Stirling engines are now commercially available up to 25 kW of generating capacity. The final prototype consists of a two cylinder inline alpha arrangement.  The project has been completed with a multitude of testing and troubleshooting phases. The team was successful in getting the engine to run with a hand held heat source and give more time, feels confident that the engine could run on solar power.  A detailed section of testing is provided in this report and summarizes the steps taken to develop a working stirling engine. The following report presents the design selection process, final design with inclusive engineering drawings, the associated engineering design calculations, define requirements, testing analysis, a finalized budget, and a conclusion summarizing the optimal operating conditions of our engine.     vi  
  7. 7. 1. INTR RODUCTI ION In the recent ‘green‐en nergy’ movem ment the Stirling cycle has received renewed interesst in the area of solar enerrgy generatio on, and it is th of team 04 to help raise aw he intention o wareness and promote renewable energies by y demonstrating the poten ntial of the Sti irling engine.   Stirling en ngines are kno own for havinng a high therrmodynamic efficiency.  Id deally, a Stirlin ng cycle enginne can be de esigned to app proximate thee theoretical Carnot cycle engine.  For e example, Stirrling Energy Systems, Inc (SES), a co ompany based in California, USA specia alizing in solar r energy gene eration equipment is currently recognized d for holding t the world reccord for solar‐‐to‐grid conve ersion efficienncy of 31.25% %  TM T 1with theirr SunCatcher  solar powe ered Stirling e engine and mi irrored dish c collector.   See Figure 1 forr a  TMpicture off a proposed a array of SunC Catcher  unit ts.  SES has proposed to bu uild 70,000 of these units in the Californian Mojave e Desert and IImperial Valle ey that will yield a combined generating g capacity of 1,750 MW W of electricity.  Team 04 a accredits thesse SES project ts as well as oother projects s of similar aspirationns for inspiring the team too design and build a working Stirling en ngine to fulfill the requirem ments of Dalhou usie Design Prroject 2008/009.    Figure 1 ‐ S Solar Energy Pro oject Proposal o ted in California Mojave Desert using SunCatch TM Technolog of Solar Array sit her gies  2 from SES SStirling Energy Systems  The reporrt will outline a background of the ideal Stirling cyclee, summarize the design seelection process, present th he final design and individual compone ents, discuss t the calculations and technical engineering decisions made to refin ne the final design, presen nements and testing proce nt design refin edures.  The t team budget will also be preesented as we ell as a detaile ed conclusionn outlining the e design requ uirements establishe ed in first sem mester.  The fiinal engineering drawings are attached d in the Appen ndix D.                                                             1 th  Stirling Energy Systems, SES.  (2008a). New Wo orld Record for Sola ar‐to‐Grid Convers sion Efficiency.  Ac ccessed on Septem mber 20 , 2008 fro om http://www.s stirlingenergy.com m/downloads/12‐F February‐2008‐SES S‐Stirling‐Energy‐and‐Sandia‐National‐Laboratories‐se et‐New‐World‐Rec cord.pdf 2  Stirling Ene ergy Systems, SEES. (2008b). Sola d on November 15th, 2008 from  ar Two. Accessedhttp://www w.stirlingenergy.c com/projects/de efault.asp   1  
  8. 8. 2. BACKGROUND   The following sections are intended to provide a brief overview of the ideal Stirling cycle thermodynamics and assumptions made in the analysis of a real Stirling engine.  It is very important to note that the real Stirling cycle is very complex and relies on a combination of design approximations and experimental tests to successfully design and build a working Stirling engine.  Since the analyses developed for designing Stirling engines are inaccurate and because experimentation is expensive the accepted course for building a Stirling engine is to model off of existing engines using experimental scaling parameters.  Unfortunately, for the design of this project there is a lack of reference material that could be used for scaling purposes.  Hence, the team has relied heavily on scaling the design from a known working gamma type Stirling engine, property of Dalhousie.  By using these approximations with ideal Stirling cycle theory and analyses the team is confident that the project will be successful given the time allotted for testing and refinement in 2009.  The project has been designed to allow for refinement and adjustments which is critical given the lack of known theory. 2.1. Ideal Stirling Engine Cycle The ideal Stirling cycle is represented in Figure 2 and consists of four processes which combine to form a closed cycle: two isothermal and two isochoric processes.  The processes are shown on both a pressure‐volume (P‐v) diagram and a temperature‐entropy (T‐s) diagram as per Figure 2.  The area under the process path of the P‐v diagram is the work and the area under the process path of the T‐s diagram is the heat.  Depending on the direction of integration the work and heat will either be added to or subtracted from the system.  Work is produced by the cycle only during the isothermal processes.  To facilitate the exchange of work to and from the system a flywheel must be integrated into the design which serves as an energy exchange hub or storage device.  Heat must be transferred during all processes.  See Table 1 for a description of the 4 processes of the ideal Stirling cycle (Borgnakke et al., 2003).    Figure 2 ‐ Ideal Stirling Cycle P‐v and T‐s Diagrams3                                                              3  Power from the Sun. (2008a). Power Cycles for Electricity Generation. Accessed on October 12th, 2008 from  http://www.powerfromthesun.net/chapter12/Chapter12new.htm#12.3.1%20%20%20%20%20Stirling%20Engines  2  
  9. 9. The net work produced by the closed ideal Stirling cycle is represented by the area 1‐2‐3‐4 on the P‐v diagram.  From the first law of thermodynamics the net work output must equal the net heat input represented by the area 1‐2‐3‐4 on the T‐s diagram.  The Stirling cycle can best approximate the Carnot cycle out of all gas powered engine cycles by integrating a regenerator into the design.  The regenerator can be used to take heat from the working gas in process 4‐1 and return the heat in process 2‐3.  Recall that the Carnot cycle represents the maximum theoretical efficiency of a thermodynamic cycle.  Cycle efficiency is of prime importance for a solar powered engine for reasons that the size of the solar collector can be reduced and thus the cost to power output ratio can be decreased. Table 1 : Ideal Stirling Cycle Process SummaryProcess 1‐2 : Isothermal compression  • Heat rejection to low temperature heat sink   • 1Q2 = area 1‐2‐b‐a on T‐s diagram  • Work is done on the working fluid (energy exchange from flywheel)    • 1W2 = area 1‐2‐b‐a on P‐v diagram Process 2‐3 : Isochoric heat addition  • Heat addition (energy exchange from regenerator)  • 2Q3 = area 2‐3‐c‐b on T‐s diagram  • No work is done  • 2W3 = 0 Process 3‐4 : Isothermal expansion  • Heat addition from high temperature heat sink  • 3Q4 = area 3‐4‐d‐c on T‐s diagram  • Work is done by the working fluid (energy exchange to flywheel)  • 3W4 = area 3‐4‐a‐b on P‐v diagram Process 4‐1 : Isochoric heat rejection  • Heat rejection (energy exchange to regenerator)  • 4Q1 = area 1‐4‐d‐a on T‐s diagram  • No work is done  • 4W1 = 0 2.2. Real Stirling Engine Cycle The real Stirling engine cycle is represented in Figure 3 below.  As can be seen there is work being done during processes 2‐3 and 4‐1 unlike the prediction of zero work in the ideal cycle.  One of the major causes for inefficiency of the real Stirling cycle involves the regenerator.  The addition of a regenerator adds friction to the flow of the working gas.  In order for the real cycle to approximate the Carnot cycle the regenerator would have to reach the temperature of the high temperature thermal sink so that TR=TH.  A measure of the regenerator effectiveness is given by Equation 1, with the value of e=1 being ideal.                                                                                                                                                                                                    3  
  10. 10.   Figure 3 ‐ Real Stirling Cycle P‐v Diagram Approximation4   ……………………………………………………………………………………… (1) TH = Temperature of high thermal sink TL = Temperature of low thermal sink TR = Mass averaged gas temperature of regenerator leaving during heating The Carnot efficiency is denoted by Equation 2 and the real cycle efficiency with regenerator is denoted by Equation 3.  Though regeneration is not required for a Stirling cycle, its inclusion can help improve the efficiency if applied properly.  Note how the regenerator efficiency does not tend to zero as the regenerator effectiveness tends to zero.   1   ……………………………………….………….………….……………… (2)  ⁄ ⁄ ⁄ ⁄ ……………………………………… (3)  ………………………………………………………………………... (4)                                                             4  Power from the Sun. (2008b). Power Cycles for Electricity Generation. Accessed on October 12th, 2008 from http://www.powerfromthesun.net/chapter12 /Chapter12new.htm#12.3.1%20%20%20%20%20Stirling%20Engines   4  
  11. 11. Another major cause for inefficiencies of the real Stirling cycle engine is that not all of the working gas participates in the cycle, i.e. dead volume.  The dead volume involves the volume that does not participate in the swept volume of the piston stroke.  Martini (2004) states that the relationship between the percentage of dead volume in the system to the decrease in work done per cycle is linear.  Therefore, if the engine has 20% dead volume then the power output would be 80% of the power that would be produced with zero dead volume.  In actuality, dead space will always be present because the addition of internal heat exchangers, clearances, transfer tubes, and regenerators are required to enhance the heat exchange of the real system.   Though the ideal Stirling cycle can be analyzed using known thermodynamic principles, the analysis exists as an approximation of the real Stirling engine.  Team 4 took this into consideration in the final design of the Stirling engine so that certain design parameters such as the stroke length, temperature differential, and flywheel mass could be altered during the testing phase to optimize the Stirling engine.        5  
  12. 12. 3. DESIGN REQUIREMENTS  The following design requirements of Table 2 summarize the scope of the project, the final goals, and objectives team 04 intended to achieve.   Table 2 : Design Requirements   Design & Operational Elements  • Must be able to operate using a solar heat source.  • Must be able to operate using a compact heat source that is safe for indoor use.  • Must be able to operate unassisted after starting for a minimum of 5 minutes (except for a  controlling heat source).  • Must be built to a standard which delivers a minimum service life expectancy of 5 years, if  properly maintained. Size, Weight and Complexity  • Total engine size and weight to be such that safe and easy transportation is possible by 1  person.  • Must be mounted on a compact support structure for stability and safety.  • Will be designed for ease of maintenance and assembly. Aesthetics & Safety  • High temperature regions must be clearly indicated.  • Engine cylinder must be equipped with a removable fitting for piston inspection and pressure  release. Documentation  • Supporting documentation and user instructions to be provided for later usage within the  Mechanical Engineering department of Dalhousie University. Cost & Materials  • Pending the usage of machining time and salvaged components, the prototype is estimated to  cost less than $3500.  • Construction materials for the support frame and engine will consist mainly of steel or  aluminum, depending on cost, availability, and component purpose.  • Precision components such as pistons, piston rings, and bearings may be purchased off the shelf  or salvaged.  6  
  13. 13. 4. DESIGN SELECTION In order to ensure the best design was chosen the design selection process was evaluated with respect to 8 design criteria.  Options were brainstormed and researched within each category to weight each design selection based on a scale of importance.  Weighted design selection charts were assembled with all important considerations to determine the best choice. The categories are: Power output, friction losses, simplicity, thermal isolation, available literature, temperature differential, efficiency, and visual aesthetics.  These categories are weighted from most important (x5) to least important (x1) which acts as a multiplier. Table 3 shows the design selection matrix.    Table 3 : Design Selection Matrix    Each design concept is rated from best (x5) to worst (x1) with respect to the design criteria. Team 04 prioritized these criterions with power generation and visual aesthetics for classroom demonstration as the most important.  The other criterions were chosen based on clear differences between the design concepts and necessary design components. The major issues to overcome when building a Stirling engine are friction losses, maintaining a high temperature differential and thermal isolation. Each criterion was weighted based on how easy the issue is to overcome. The available literature for each concept was rated least important because it has little to do with design.  Any available literature may however, aid in thermodynamic calculations for the chosen concept.  From Table 3 the team concluded that the Inline Alpha Stirling Engine was the best design concept for this project.     7  
  14. 14. 4.1. Rotary Stirling Engine Figure 4 displays the Rotary Stirling Engine in its four main positions. It is clear that the rotary design has few moving parts and therefore has the least amount of losses due to friction.  As shown in the design selection matrix, the Rotary Stirling Engine performs poorly in the categories of: power output, thermal isolation, available literature, temperature differential and efficiency. This poor performance ultimately caused the rotary concept to fail the team’s selection process.     Figure 4 ‐ Rotary Stirling Engine5 a) The air is in the cold lower portion, contracting, and drawing the piston upwards. b) The inertia of the flywheel continues rotation in this neutral phase. c) The air is in the hot upper portion, expanding, and pushing the piston downwards. d) The inertia of the flywheel continues rotation in this neutral phase. 4.2. Gamma Stirling Engine The Gamma Stirling Engine appears to be a popular design for working models.  The main difference in this model is the use of two cylindrical pistons as per Figure 5. The motion of the displacer piston in the gamma concept is reciprocating as opposed to rotational in the rotary design.  As outlined in the design selection matrix, the gamma concept shows an increase in friction losses when compared to the rotary design.  This would be a result of an increase in moving parts and an increase in complexity of design. Thermal isolation and maintaining a temperature differential become easier with the gamma model as this design uses two isolated pistons.                                                             5  Lewis, Jim. (2001). New Simplified Heat Engine. Modified from http://www.emachineshop.com /engine/animation.htm  8  
  15. 15. Figure 5 ‐ G Gamma Stirling E Engine 4.3. Alp pha Stirling g Engine ‐ 90° Arrang gement The 90° arrangement o of the Alpha SStirling Engine e shown in Figure 6 featur res two sealed d pistons with h a transfer tube and optio onal regeneraator between n the two cylin nders.  Whenn compared to o the rotary a and gamma co oncepts in thee selection m matrix, the alpha arrangement is the mo ost efficient and produces the most powwer.  However r, due to the 9 90° orientatioon this concept has the po otential to cre eate more fricction.  Alignment of the shaft ts would be crrucial and anyy error would d add to the s system friction: ultimately deciding wwhether or no ot the design succeeds.    Figure 6 ‐ Alpha Stir rling Engine – 90 0° Arrangementa) Expanssion ‐ Most of f the gas is in the hot cylinder and begin ns to expand driving both pistons inward.   Work i is output duriing the onset t of this proceess. b) Transfeer ‐ Cold pisto on is forced ddownward allo owing the heated gas to b be transfer to the cold cylin nder. c) Contraction ‐ Expan nded gas is in the cold cylin nder and cont tracts drawing both pistonns outward. d) Transfeer ‐ The contrracted gas is s still located in n the cold cylinder.  Work is input into t the system byy the  inertia al energy of thhe flywheel w which carries t the crank throough 90°, transferring the gas back to tthe  hot cylinder, and co ompleting the e cycle.  9  
  16. 16. 5. COMPONENT DESIGN, FABRICATION AND BUILD PROCESS Following the design selection process the Inline Alpha Stirling Engine Arrangement shown in Figure 7 was chosen for the final design.  This design excelled in the categories of power output, thermal isolation, temperature differential and visual aesthetics.    Figure 7 ‐ Final Concept to Build Comparison The design of our engine was based on ease of assembly and disassembly. Because of this, all components are fastened together using either nuts and bolts or cap head machine screws.  This was beneficial for our team as it allowed for quick engine component modifications, such as size of stroke length and piston rod length.  The entire fabrication process took approximately one month. This was due to the large number of parts and high level of precision required. The following sub‐sections will outline the design methods of various components as well as discuss any modifications made to the initial designs. 5.1. Frame As depicted in Figure 8, the frame will be used to support the piston cylinders and flywheel rotating assembly.  The frame was constructed of ½” 6061 Aluminum Plate because it is light weight, durable and easy to machine.  The majority of the frame manufacturing was completed using a milling machine, with the exception of parts that require a precision circular hole (i.e. flywheel supports and cylinder clamps).  The bearing seats in the supports for the flywheel were slightly changed during the fabrication process.  For a cleaner look, instead of having the bearing flush with the outside edge of the frame, the bearing was pushed further into the stand and an internal retaining ring was used to hold it in place (Figure 8).   10  
  17. 17.   Figure 8 ‐ Assembled Frame and New Bearing Seat 5.2. Cylinders and Cylinder Heads To maximize the heat transfer between the cold cylinder and the surrounding water bath the team designed a simple array of annular fins to increase the external surface area of the cylinder. Heat transfer calculations for steel and brass, available in Appendix C, show an approximate 320‐400% increase in heat transfer with the addition of a fin 15mm in length.  Based on these calculations the team selected brass as the cold cylinder material as it enabled a larger heat transfer when compared to steel.  Other benefits of choosing brass over steel are that it will not rust in the ice bath and it has improved dry frictional characteristics with steel (i.e. brass is a self lubricating metal). The team chose a large number of fins with a spacing 2.5 times the thickness to ensure maximum surface area. Because the system involves free convection it was important to choose large fin spacing. By increasing the water volume between the fins the result is effectively an increase in the engine efficiency. A larger volume of water between fins will take longer to heat up, thus maintaining a higher temperature differential for an extended period of time. The original cylinder design was a one piece cylinder and cylinder head.  After some brainstorming and discussions with our technician, our team decided it was best to construct the cylinder and cylinder head in two pieces.  This would allow for a more precise finish on the inside bore of the cylinders as well as allow for easy assembly and troubleshooting if required.  The manufacturing process was carried out using a lathe.  The finalized cylinders can be seen in Figure 9.  11  
  18. 18.   Figure 9 ‐ Hot and Cold Cylinders and Cylinder Heads 5.3. Pistons To help reduce friction and increase durability, grooved pistons are used in our system.  The grooves around the piston serve as a pressure seal when the piston and cylinder are machined to low tolerances. The piston was originally going to be constructed of cold rolled steel to ensure consistency in thermal expansion for the hot cylinder assembly.  However, our technician supplied us with a similar material that was easier to machine and finish.  This was considered to be important due to the high tolerances between the piston and cylinder walls. The better the surface finish the lower the friction generated.  The brass‐on‐steel interaction between the cold cylinder and piston will not pose an issue for thermal expansion due to the low temperature gradient across the cold cylinder assembly as designed. The interaction of brass and steel has low sliding frictional properties. Figure 10 displays the manufacturing process of one of the pistons on the lathe as well as the finished product.    Figure 10 ‐ Piston Manufacturing and Final Product 5.4. Cranks The design of the cranks had to incorporate two things, stroke length and the generation of a force couple.  The stroke length of our system is twice the distance from the center of rotation of the crank to  12  
  19. 19. the location where the piston rod is connected.  The stroke length could be easily lengthened or shortened by changing the location of the hole accordingly. In addition to stroke length, the other governing factor on the design of the crank was the need to create a force couple that would cancel the linear translational force exerted on the system due to the mass of the piston accelerating over its stroke length.  As the piston reaches top and bottom dead center in its stroke, the acceleration of the piston mass changing directions generates a sinusoidal force on the system which has the potential to produce undesired and damaging vibrations.  In order to cancel this sinusoidal force caused by the piston mass, the crank is typically designed as an eccentric mass that creates a balancing force.  Figure 11 shows the initial design of the crank with the force couple indicated.  Here FC defines the balancing force of the eccentric crank and FP is the force due to the sinusoidal motion of the piston.  ½ Stroke Length Fp  Fc   Figure 11 ‐ Crank Design Showing Force Couple and Stroke Length 5.5. Flywheel and Collars One of the major components of our design is the flywheel; a mechanical device designed to have a significant rotational moment of inertia.  Flywheels are used as rotational energy storage devices to resist changes in rotational speed, thus aiding in maintaining smooth shaft rotation. In addition to this, flywheels assist in driving the system over the duration of a cycle in which no net power is being produced.  During these periods the flywheel uses its stored energy to power the system through the portion of the cycle where no power is produced.  This feature is very important in the design of a Stirling Engine because 25% of the cycle is flywheel dependant (both pistons are compressing the working fluid); hence work is required by the system.  Another 50% of the cycle does not involve any work input or output; here the flywheel is required to provide the power necessary to smoothly overcome any frictional forces in the system. This concept is presented in Figure 12. The states of the cycle can be referenced as per Figure 2, Figure 3 and Figure 16.  It was manufactured from steel using a lathe.  13  
  20. 20.   Figure 12 ‐ Stirling Cycle Flywheel Dependance 5.6. Piston Rods and Brass Connection Fittings The fittings used to connect the piston rods to the pistons and cranks were made of brass due to its low sliding frictional properties.  During the manufacturing process a slight modification was made to one of the brass fittings. The length of the piece closest to the piston was increased from 0.875” to 1.125” to allow for more threads for the machine screw holding the piston in place.  As a result the original piston rod length was shortened by 0.250”.  Team 04 made sure to make brass fitting design simple to inter‐change piston rod length as it might be necessary during the testing phase of the project.  The piston rod and brass fitting setup can be seen in Figure 13.    Figure 13 ‐ Brass Fittings and Connecting Rods 5.7. Fresnel Spot Lens For the solar aspect of our design project our team selected a Fresnel Spot Lens.  A spot lens was chosen for its concentrated beam shape and adjustability in focusing the incident solar radiation onto the hot cylinder head.  The Lens was purchased online and measures 27” x 36”.  Our team constructed a frame for the lens that allows for vertical adjustments as well as 360° rotation about the horizontal axis.  This  14  
  21. 21. was crucial as it allowed for tracking of the sun which is required to maintain spot temperature intensity.  Figure 14displays the Fresnel lens and frame.    Figure 14 ‐ Fresnel Lens and Frame  15  
  22. 22. 6. DESIGN ANALYSIS AND REVISED CALCULATIONS The following sections summarize the results of intensive engineering calculations concerned primarily with the external heat transfer and thermodynamics of the working fluid.  The raw data and calculations can be found in the Appendices.  The calculations have been re‐done to reflect the changes made to the design in January and the final optimized configuration as of April 2009.   6.1. Schmidt Analysis of Ideal Isothermal Model To determine the theoretical energy output an ideal isothermal analysis was performed on a simplified model of the final engine design.  The ideal isothermal analysis is incapable of predicting results for the real cycle but can be used as a guide for design refinement purposes and to gauge the maximum theoretical capabilities of the engine.  The assumptions of an ideal isothermal model are defined below:  • Temperature of compression space/cold cylinder is at the lower limit of the cold sink  • Temperature of expansion space/hot cylinder is at the upper limit of the hot sink   • Heat exchangers are 100% effective   • Regenerator is 100% effective  • Volume of the working spaces vary sinusoidally with crank angle   Refer to Figure 15 for a representation of the isothermal alpha Stirling engine.  The issue with the isothermal analysis is that the heat transfer from the internal heat exchangers is zero because there is no temperature differential to facilitate the flow of heat.  The net heat exchange between the compression and expansion spaces with the surroundings is equal to the net work.  A more accurate model would involve an adiabatic analysis; however, the solution is much more complicated and requires an iterative solver.  The solution to the adiabatic analysis is still an approximation and it could not be justified for this design.    Figure 15 ‐ Simplified Isothermal Alpha Stirling Engine6                                                             6  Urieli, Israel. (2002a). Isothermal Analysis of Alpha Stirling Engine. Accessed on November 1st, 2008 from http://www.sesusa.org/DrIz/isothermal/isothermal.html  16  
  23. 23. The ideal isothermal approximation of the Stirling cycle was used to generate a list of equations describing the thermodynamic process.  The Schmidt analysis was then used to solve these equations for pressure, temperature and energy transfer by assuming that volume varies sinusoidally with the crank angle as per Figure 16.  The states of the cycle from 1‐4 are labeled as per Figure 2 and Figure 3 as per Section 2.  Please refer to Appendix B for the derivation and solution of the isothermal Schmidt analysis.     1  2 3 4   Figure 16 ‐ Sinusoidal Volume Dependence on Crank Angle7 The analysis was performed using the original design specified in December, the refined design specified by the final build report in January, and by using the test results and configuration of the optimized design specified at the beginning of April.  The results are presented in Table 4.  The optimized design is discussed in more detail in Section 9.  In Section 9 the results from April will be used in a comparison of theory to experimental results to determine the overall performance of the engine and the accuracy of the Schmidt analysis.      Table 4 : Results of Schmidt Analysis of Ideal Isothermal Model    Results  December January April  PMEAN (kPa)  299 306 177  PMAX (kPa)  715 747 201  PMIN (kPa)  125 125 156  QOUTPUT(J)  ‐25.94 ‐17.07 ‐0.6338  QINPUT (J)  54.45 35.82 1.424  WNET (J)  28.51 18.75 0.7906  RPM  assume 200 assume 200 measured 384  Power (W)  95 94 5  Efficiency (%) 52 52 56                                                               7  Urieli, Israel. (2002b). Schmidt Analysis. Accessed on November 1st, 2008 from http://www.sesusa. org/DrIz/isothermal/Schmidt.html   17  
  24. 24. 6.2. Fin Heat Transfer To prove the effectiveness of adding external fins to the cold cylinder a heat transfer analysis was carried out.  Calculations were carried out for both steel and brass. The results are shown in Figure 17.  As a result of this analysis the initial fin length of 10mm was increased to 15mm as results show a considerable increase in heat transfer.  The fin length, in theory, should have been increased to 30mm for maximum heat transfer in steel.  When using brass for the cylinder material the heat transfer continues to increase with fin length; this is due to its high thermal conductivity.  However; due to frame clearance issues and ease of machining a fin length of 15mm was chosen.  With this fin length there is an approximate 320% increase in heat transfer for steel and 400% for brass when compared to using no fins.  The calculation results for 10mm and 15mm are depicted in Appendix C.  Heat Transfer and Fin Efficiency with Varying Fin Length 120 1 0.9 100 0.8 0.7 80 Fin Efficiency Heat Transfer (W) Heat Transfer Without Fins 0.6 Steel Fins 60 Brass Fins 0.5 Steel Fin Efficiency 0.4 Brass Fin Efficiency 40 0.3 0.2 20 0.1 0 0 0 0.01 0.02 0.03 0.04 0.05 Fin Length (m)   Figure 17 ‐ Heat Transfer and Fin Efficiency  18  
  25. 25. 7. INITIAL TESTING Following the completion of engine component fabrication and assembly a preliminary test was performed to evaluate engine performance. The test was performed with the engine configuration as seen in Figure 18. The test consisted of applying a propylene heat source to the hot cylinder head with no ice water cooling applied to the cold cylinder. The test was performed with all engine components being unmodified except for the use of a rubber transfer tube as procurement of additional materials was required.    Figure 18 ‐ Initial Testing Setup 7.1. Testing Observations After applying the heat source and achieving temperatures of approximately 350˚C on the hot cylinder head, operation of the engine was unsuccessful. In addition to unsatisfactory performance many undesired conditions were witnessed.  Following the initial testing failure, it became immediately apparent that a number of issues would have to be addressed: 1) the flexible transfer tube with low melting point would have to be replaced for a more permanent and robust connection, 2) as expected, the metal to metal contact of the frame with the hot cylinder acted as a thermal short that would need to be isolated/insulated to prevent large heat transfer losses to the frame and for safety reasons, and 3) high bending stresses and deflections from the large compression ratios were significant and would have to be reduced. Maximum system pressure was found to be 10 psi with single cylinder pressures capable of reaching 20 psi. Figure 19 illustrates the damage to the rubber transfer tube as a result of heat transfer to the brass push‐on connections.  19  
  26. 26. Heat Damage   Figure 19 ‐ Heat Damage to Temporary Transfer Tube 7.2. Design Solutions Initial testing provided useful information regarding engine performance and highlighted undesirable conditions. Solutions to these issues were addressed during the design refinement process and include reducing stroke length to decrease compression, insulating hot cylinder from the frame, replacing the rubber transfer tube with a metal pipe, and promoting heat transfer to the working gas. 20  
  27. 27. 8. DESIGN REFINEMENTS & PERFORMANCE IMPROVEMENTS  To address the problems identified during our initial testing, a rigorous design refinement was undertaken.  Because the art of designing a Stirling engine is not a hardened science, the design refinement process is not as simple as selecting a new electric motor from a catalogue,  or picking up a new piece of hardware from a supplier. This meant that often several iterations were required in order to see an improvement in performance. Many performance solutions were designed and tested in sequence with increasing success.  The following sub‐sections will discuss in detail the major design refinements and performance improvements undertaken.  It is in Section 9 that the iterative testing and troubleshooting procedure is demonstrated along with the testing results. 8.1. Design Refinements 8.1.1. Frame Heat Dissipation  Following our initial application of heat to the engine, it was apparent that there was a significant amount of heat being dissipated from the hot cylinder through the aluminum frame. This caused the entire engine assembly to become hot to the touch and transferred significant amounts of heat to the cylinder being cooled. This however was expected and a solution to the problem was readily available.  To prevent heat from transferring to the frame from the hot cylinder, an insulating layer of material was required at their point of contact. In order to accommodate a layer of insulation between the cylinder and the frame, modifications were required on the hot side of the cylinder clamps.  1/8“ was removed from the cylinder clamps so that the hot cylinder floated freely. Two layers of Teflon wrap in addition to Fiberglass paper insulation was then tightly wrapped around the hot cylinder to fill the 1/8” gap between the cylinder and frame clamps, see Figure 20. After the insulation was secured and the clamps adjusted, heat was again applied to the cylinder. A significant improvement was achieved with minimal heat being transferred to the frame. With the cylinder head being upwards of 550°C, the region of the frame in contact with the insulation would reach a maximum temperature of 65°C, safe enough to touch. Figure 21 is a thermal image taken of the engine after being heated and illustrates the temperature difference achieved between the cylinder head and the frame.    Figure 20 ‐ Hot Cylinder Insulation  21  
  28. 28.   Figure 21 ‐ Thermal Image 8.1.2. Compression Reduction  It was evident from the initial test that the cylinder compression was too high for the scale of our application. The pressures achieved in the cylinders were enough to cause significant vibration and bending of the frame itself. High compression, however, is the main characteristic of the Alpha type Stirling engine due to there being two sealed pistons and cylinders. Suitable compression ratios for these types of engines are not well documented therefore an iterative design refinement was required when trying to achieve a compression ratio that provided a significant performance increase. To reduce the compression, two options were available. One was to decrease the stroke length which would reduce the volume of air being compressed; the second was to reduce the connecting rod length which would increase the minimum volume of the system there by decreasing the amount of compression. The stroke length was first reduced by ¾” by drilling new holes in the cranks. This significantly reduced the compression and provided the first noteworthy performance gains. After testing this stroke length with various sizes of connecting rods, the stroke was again reduced by 5/8”, see Figure 22. After machining several new sizes of connecting rods, it was possible to significantly decrease the compression of the system. The motor exhibited “signs of life” and would attempt to maintain itself in operation.    22  
  29. 29.   Figure 22 ‐ Stroke Length Reduction 8.1.3. Transfer Tube The original transfer tube, which was only selected for initial testing, had a maximum temperature rating that was much less than the application required. Heat quickly conducted through the brass fitting on the cylinder head, elevating the temperature of the hose beyond its melting point. Sufficient testing was unable to be performed until a suitable replacement transfer connection was found. Several attempts were made to build a transfer tube using ½”copper pipe; however, soldering the joints was not an option as most solder has a melting temperature of around 190°C which is below the operating temperature of the hot cylinder. The brass fitting on the cylinder head had the potential to melt the solder. An alternative to soldering the joints was the use of JB weld. This provided initial success however sufficient temperatures caused the JB weld to crack, reducing the integrity of the transfer tube, see Figure 23. Finally the use of threaded steel fittings provided an adequate solution that withstood repeated tests without diminished results, see Figure 24.    Figure 23 ‐ Heat Damaged Transfer Tube  23  
  30. 30.   Figure 24 ‐ Steel Transfer Tube 8.2. PERFORMANCE IMPROVEMENTS Following several iterations of design refinements, many of the initial complications were overcome. In an effort to improve the performance and efficiency of the engine, several engineering improvements were made.  Due to the extensive amount of time dedicated to design and the high quality of machining, the engine had a high mechanical efficiency. Frictional losses were not a major factor limiting performance; however, it was evident that improvements were required to increase the thermal efficiency of the system. 8.2.1. Internal Fins Early in the design process initial brainstorming began on an internal fin array that would increase heat transfer to and from the working gas. This concept was not finalized before fabrication of the engine had commenced and the idea was put on hold. After the initial testing provided insight into the thermal efficiency of the engine, it was decided that internal fins might provide increased engine performance.  The internal fin array was to be seated against the cylinder head (both hot and cold) and in the direct path of the gas flow to maximize heat transfer. The fins of an aluminum vehicle radiator provided an ideal solution with relatively minimal fabrication required. A used radiator was salvaged from an auto shop and a portion of the fin structure was removed. A circular pattern equal to the internal diameter of the cylinders was then applied to the section of radiator where it was then cut with a band saw and sanded smooth, see Figure 25.  Aluminum sleeves were machined to encase the circular fins and to protect the cylinder walls from scratching. In addition to providing protection, the aluminum sleeves ensure an intimate contact with the cylinder walls for the efficient heat transfer. Figure 26 shows the completed fins situated in the cylinder. The internal fins proved effective at assisting heat transfer and provided a notable performance increase.      24  
  31. 31.     Figure 25 ‐ Internal Fins Fabrication Process    Figure 26 ‐ Internal Fin Placement 8.2.2. Regenerator In an effort to further increase the thermal efficiency of the engine the use of a regenerator was selected. The initial engine design called for the use of a regenerator, however, our limited understanding of regenerator design and the difficulties we had already incurred due to troublesome transfer tubes, made us reluctant to begin further modifications.  The effect of including a regenerator in the transfer tube had already been examined during the design selection process and operates much like an economizer situated in the gas flow between the hot and cold cylinders. The regenerator design consisted of a section of ¾”steel pipe with flanges welded on each end, see Figure 27. The flanged pipe was fitted between the cylinders and replaced the existing transfer tube, see Figure 28. Steel wool was inserted in the pipe to provide a dense thermal mass to exchange heat with the gas flow between cylinders. The large surface area of the steel wool provided  25  
  32. 32. efficient heat transfer to strip heat from the gas as it flowed into the cold cylinder and return that heat to the cooled gas as it traveled back into the hot cylinder. The addition of the regenerator provided a significant performance increase and allowed for sustained operation of the engine.    Figure 27 ‐ Regenerator Components     Figure 28 ‐ Installed Regenerator with Ice Water Bath 26  
  33. 33. 9. Testing and Troubleshooting The following sections will describe the various tests performed on the solar collector and Stirling engine from January to April 2009. Of critical importance is the iterative testing procedure developed by the team to progressively and successfully optimize engine performance.  This procedure was necessary as there are many parameters that must be considered when designing a Stirling engine which are not easily determined and often require fine tuning and modification of the constructed engine.  This proved to be a gamble as the team would only get one shot to build an engine, so the team designed an engine that could be easily modified to meet a wide range of operating conditions and assembly configurations.  It is for these reasons that team 4 planned in advance an extended testing period. 9.1. Fresnel Lens Testing The solar collector used in the following tests is referred to as a Fresnel lens.  The lens is a light weight acrylic film fixed in a rectangular wooden frame of dimensions 36”x 27” for a total area of 0.627 m2.  Using a daily average solar insolation of ~ 500 W/m2 for the month of March as cited by Environment Canada, the maximum solar input using the lens would be ~314 W.  This number is a conservative estimate and realistic heat rates were determined indirectly through experimental measurements in Test #2 below.  Proper safety precautions were strictly practiced when using the lens: 1) weld goggles were used by the individual when required for recording temperatures, 2) the lens was tilted away from the sun when transporting and left unattended, 3) the focal point was tracked and located using a long piece of wood, and 4) fire extinguishers and/or water was close at hand in case of fire. 9.1.1. Test #1 ‐ General Testing Results ‐ January 23rd (2 pm) Following the construction of the wooden frame depicted in Figure 29 required to support the Fresnel lens, team 4 conducted numerous qualitative and quantitative tests which involved simply holding a variety of objects under the focal point of the lens.  These tests helped serve as a basis for understanding the effects of surface conditions and types of materials on heat generation rates and temperature distributions.      Figure 29 ‐ Fresnel Lens and Infrared Thermometer Readings  27  
  34. 34. Figure 30 depicts some of the various objects used to demonstrate the concentrating power of the  Fresnel lens.  The first object is of an aluminum can that was held under the focal point for  approximately 10 seconds.  Aluminum has a melting temperature of 660°C.  Even though aluminum  has a high thermal conductivity and reflective surface the lens was still able to concentrate enough  energy fast enough to melt the aluminum.  The amount of heating could be increased by insulating  the object from the environment and by painting the surface a dull black to minimize reflectivity.  The lens was also capable of creating molten asphalt.  It was also demonstrated that the lens could  set fire to wood instantaneously.       Figure 30 ‐ Various Objects Held under the Fresnel Lens 9.1.2. Test #2‐ Temperature Measurements ‐ April 1st (12:40 to 1:10 pm) The intent of this test was to determine the rate of heat absorption of a cylindrical steel object of dimensions 3”D x 2‐1/8”L.  The surface of the object was painted black and the sides and base were insulated.  A digital picture of the cylindrical steel object is shown in Figure 31.  The ambient temperature was 5°C on a clear, sunny day.  The temperature was read at a depth of three quarters the length using an infrared thermometer and recorded every 30 seconds for a total of 30 minutes.  The results are displayed in Figure 32 below.  The temperature increases over time in an exponential relationship as expected from theory (as the surface temperature increases the losses due to convection and radiation increase so a leveling off occurs).  Temperatures just above 310°C were achieved at the 30 minute mark. The test was repeated with the propylene torch which is the heat source used during testing.  The idea here is to compare the relative heat transfer rates of the torch and lens.  Figure 32 shows that it took the torch half the time to reach temperatures above 310°C, so a very crude approximation suggests that the torch has double the heating potential in comparison to the lens.  Note that the performance of the lens depends on the time of year, weather, time, and ambient air conditions, as well as other numerous factors so it is possible to improve on this.  It is very important to consider the testing results from Section 9.4.5 which required the team to apply the torch only 40 to 50% of the operating time to sustain peak RPM above 300.  From these results, it is not difficult to say that it is very possible for the engine to operate with the Fresnel lens alone under the right conditions.    28  
  35. 35.     Figure 31 ‐ Cylindrical Steel Object Test #4 ‐ Fresnel Lens Testing 350 300 250 Temperature (°C) 200 150 100 50 0 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 Time (min) Fresnel Lens Heat Source Propylene Torch Heat Source   Figure 32 ‐ Temperature Increase of Steel Stock vs. Time   By using the temperature data of heating the steel specimen over the 30 minutes a rough estimate of the average net solar heating was calculated as 147 W.  Considering an ideal solar input of 314 W, the overall solar collection efficiency is about 47% depending on ambient conditions.  Since the heating rates of the torch are about double that of the Fresnel lens, a conservative estimate for the amount of net heat input from the torch would be about 300 W.  These power rates are not absolute, but resemble the difference between input and losses and would equal to zero once the temperature reaches steady state.   29  
  36. 36. 9.1.3. Test #3 ‐ Solar Energy Input to Gamma ‘Windmill’ Stirling Engine ‐ April 1st April 1st would prove to be the last available day to test the solar collector before the project deadline on April 9th due to lack of permitting weather conditions.  Thus, the team was not able to demonstrate that the engine could be powered solely by solar radiation.  Though the test was never performed on the optimized and very much capable engine, the results from the lens testing show that it is very possible to get the engine running from solar radiation alone using the existing solar collector (if not it would be a simple matter of buying a slightly bigger lens!). In spite of the lack of solar testing results, the team was able to get the model gamma displacer type Stirling engine to run from solar radiation alone as depicted in Figure 33.  This test itself demonstrates that it is possible to power a Stirling engine using the existing solar collector.  It is important to note that the team’s engine was capable of operating much faster, longer and more efficiently than the gamma engine when using the same propylene torch as a heat source.  The scalability of the team’s alpha engine to the gamma engine are similar geometrically (swept volume, piston diameter, etc.) which also helps to validate the potential for the engine to be solar powered.      Figure 33 ‐ Gamma Windmill Stirling Engine 9.2. Iterative Testing and Troubleshooting Procedure Testing of the Stirling engine began on February 25th and was unsuccessful.  The initial assembly is depicted in Figure 18 and reveals the incomplete frame.  Since the initial failure, multiple engine configurations have been tested by manipulating the various design parameters.  In the beginning it was extremely difficult to diagnose why the engine refused to run because there were many parameters to consider, many of which were multi‐dependent on each other (i.e. depending on the configuration, a change in one parameter might improve the engine performance in some respect but negatively influence other parameters so as to unexpectedly render the engine in a worse condition or result in no effect at all). Through trial and error team 4 began to develop a greater understanding of these relationships which are summarized in are summarized in Table 5 below.  Following a complicated but intelligent iterative testing and troubleshooting process team  30  
  37. 37. 4 was able to successfully optimize engine performance.  The rest of this section will describe the various tests performed and demonstrate the successive iteration process summarized in     31  

×