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MARRIAGE IN 18TH       CENTURY          GAMZE KUMRU
1. Choosing Spouse Economic, social or political consolidation   Marriage was primarily a contact between two    families...
   “If a young woman has    beauty birth breeding wit    sense manners modesty    and all to an extreme; If    she has no...
The villa was built in                                                 1745 by Fabrizio                                   ...
   These circumstances made marriage arrangements within    the land owning orders a matter of delicate negotitation    “...
Personal affection,companionship and friendship                   Physical attraction   “ - You know she has nothing and y...
 Parents   threaten to withdraw financial  support Young men and women among the lowest  levels of laboring poor could m...
2. Wedding   The Wedding of Stephen Beckingham and Mary Cox - William Hogarth,    1729
Clandestine marriage   quikness   cheapness   secrecy Fleet marriage Bigamy
1753 Marriage ActAn Act for the Better Preventing of  Clandestine MarriageLord Hardwicke   The first statutory legislatio...
AFTERBEFORE
3. Widowhood Freedom Jointure Spouse   can remarry
4. DivorceIt was only the wealthy who could afford the expenses Act of Parliament Religious Ecclesiastical Court    But ...
William Hogarth’s Marriage à-la-mode (1743–1745)1. The Marriage Settlement
2. The Tête à Tête
3. The Inspection
4. The Toilette
5. The   Bagnio
6. The Ladys Death
Marriage in 18 th century
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Marriage in 18 th century

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Marriage in 18 th century

  1. 1. MARRIAGE IN 18TH CENTURY GAMZE KUMRU
  2. 2. 1. Choosing Spouse Economic, social or political consolidation Marriage was primarily a contact between two families for the exchange of concrete benefits. The typical landlord would be delighted if his sons married wealthy heiresses, regardless of the source of their fortunes. Daughters had to marry off well, without loss of status.To find and secure suitable marriages for their daughters was matter of ceaseless calculating and campaingning for the landowner and his wife
  3. 3.  “If a young woman has beauty birth breeding wit sense manners modesty and all to an extreme; If she has not money she is nobody she had as good want them all; nothing but money now reccomends a woman; the men play the game all into their own hands.” Moll Flanders
  4. 4. The villa was built in 1745 by Fabrizio Grech as a dowry for the marriage of his daughter Maria Teresa to Nicolas Perdicoma i Bologna . To make his daughter attractive on the marriage market, alandowner customarily bestowed a dowry on his daughter at thetime of her marriage. Having daughters was a serious drain an family’s sources
  5. 5.  These circumstances made marriage arrangements within the land owning orders a matter of delicate negotitation “So far, madam, from your being concerned alone [in your marriage], your concern is the least, or surely the least important. It is the honor of your family which is concerned in this alliance; you are only the instrument. Do you conceive, mistress, that in an intermarriage between kingdoms . . . The princess herself is alone considered in th e match? No, it is a match between two kingdoms rather than between two persons. The same happens in great families such as ours. The alliance between the families is the principal matter.” Henry Fielding’s Tom Jones
  6. 6. Personal affection,companionship and friendship Physical attraction “ - You know she has nothing and you may have several ladies with good fourtunes. - I love the girl and I will never please my pocket in marrying and not please my fancy.” Moll Flanders
  7. 7.  Parents threaten to withdraw financial support Young men and women among the lowest levels of laboring poor could marry without fearing that their parents would punish them through disinheritance because there was no property to be inherited.
  8. 8. 2. Wedding The Wedding of Stephen Beckingham and Mary Cox - William Hogarth, 1729
  9. 9. Clandestine marriage quikness cheapness secrecy Fleet marriage Bigamy
  10. 10. 1753 Marriage ActAn Act for the Better Preventing of Clandestine MarriageLord Hardwicke The first statutory legislation Parental consent under the age of 21 In the church By regular clergymen During daytime
  11. 11. AFTERBEFORE
  12. 12. 3. Widowhood Freedom Jointure Spouse can remarry
  13. 13. 4. DivorceIt was only the wealthy who could afford the expenses Act of Parliament Religious Ecclesiastical Court But for poor who had little property dissolving marriage was much more easier. All that required was community’s approval, consent of all parties and a change of households.Divorce would not become legal alternative for the majority until 1857. Wife sale
  14. 14. William Hogarth’s Marriage à-la-mode (1743–1745)1. The Marriage Settlement
  15. 15. 2. The Tête à Tête
  16. 16. 3. The Inspection
  17. 17. 4. The Toilette
  18. 18. 5. The Bagnio
  19. 19. 6. The Ladys Death

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