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2014 15 course guide final

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2014 15 course guide final

  1. 1. 1 Dear Students and Parents, The Secondary Course Guide for Georgetown East View High School and Georgetown High School is a valuable tool to assist you as you prepare for high school classes at either high school. The purpose of this guide is to provide you with information on State and Georgetown Independent School District graduation requirements to enable you to make the best decisions for your high school career. This guide includes high school graduation requirements, career programs of study, college admission processes, and opportunities for school involvement to ensure a successful high school experience. Georgetown ISD is committed to helping all students plan for a bright and promising future. I encourage you to carefully study the information in this catalog to make course choices that will solidify individual interests and goals as well as meet all graduation requirements. All students should consider which course selections will lead to the greatest number of future opportunities. These programs allow you to make choices that best suit your individual needs. When choosing courses for a particular year, it is important to consider the implications for the subsequent high school years, graduation, and post-high school years. I encourage you to select challenging courses that meet your needs and prepare you to meet your educational and career goals. In Georgetown ISD, there is a wide range of programs designed to prepare students for post-high school experiences: college, business or technical school, military service, fine arts, immediate employment, and many others. We begin the enrollment process with great anticipation for the year to come. Please contact the campus counselor(s) for more information on the many services and resources available for your high school careers. Also note that any updates or changes to the course guide are made to the online version only and will, in every situation, be considered the most current and final 2014-15 Course Guide. Best regards for a wonderful school year, Joe Dan Lee Superintendent Georgetown ISD is an equal opportunity employer and does not discriminate in hiring based on age, race, color, creed, religion, disability, gender, ethnic or national origin, or military or veteran status. GISD prohibits discrimination against individuals with disabilities and will reasonable accommodate applicants with a disability, upon request, and will provide equal employment opportunities in accordance with Titles VI and VII, Title IX, Age Discrimination Act, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, as amended, Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act, and local Board policies FB (Legal) and FB (Local).
  2. 2. 2 Georgetown Independent School District BOARD OF TRUSTEES SCOTT ALARCON President MIKE HEWLETT Vice-President RONNA JOHNSON Secretary FRED BARHYDT GREG EADY SCOTT STRIBLING ANDY WEBB Georgetown East View High School 4490 E. University Avenue Georgetown, Texas 78626 (512) 943-1800 Georgetown High School 2211 N. Austin Avenue Georgetown, Texas 78626 (512) 943-5100 Richarte High School 2295 N. Austin Avenue Georgetown, Texas 78626 (512) 943-5120 Note: Courses in this catalog may not be available on all campuses or may not be offered in a given year. A minimum of 10 students must enroll in a course in order for the course to be offered in a given semester.
  3. 3. 3 TABLE OF CONTENTS STUDENT SERVICES ...................................................................4 CORE ACADEMICS…………….............................................4 PRE AND ADVANCED PLACEMENT PROGRAMS......................4 CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION ..................................4 CREDIT BY EXAMINATION.....................................................5 SUMMER SCHOOL..................................................................5 GIFTED AND TALENTED SERVICES ........................................5 SERVICES FOR ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS ...................5 COURSES DESIGNATED WITH GM, M, T, SKILLS T................6 COURSES DESIGNATED WITH G, INCLUSION, BASIC ..............6 SPECIAL EDUCATION SERVICES.............................................6 SECTION 504 SERVICES .........................................................6 DYSLEXIA SERVICES .............................................................6 ACCELERATED LEARNING (ACCELL) ..................................6 REQUIRED STAAR/TAKS/EOC PREPARATION COURSES ....7 COLLEGE READINESS ........................................................ 7-8 HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS CHART ...........9 HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS .....................10 HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION PROGRAMS .....................10 GRADUATION CREDITS.................................................11 PHYSICAL EDUCATION SUBSTITUTE CREDITS .....................11 TAKS EXIT-LEVEL EXAM REQUIREMENTS.........................11 END OF COURSE ASSESSMENTS...........................................11 ACADEMIC PROGRAM INFORMATION RICHARTE HIGH SCHOOL ....................................................12 EARLY GRADUATION ..........................................................12 COLLEGE PREPARATORY CREDIT ........................................12 PRE AND ADVANCED PLACEMENT PROGRAM ..............12 EARLY COLLEGE START...............................................13 DUAL CREDIT ENROLLMENT........................................13 CO-ENROLLMENT.........................................................13 GISD/ACC DUAL CREDIT COURSE LIST ...............14, 15 TECH PREP ..................................................................16 TECH PREP ARTICULATED COURSE AGREEMENTS .......17 METHODS TO EARNING COLLEGE CREDIT CHART........18 ALTERNATIVE METHODS FOR HIGH SCHOOL CREDIT .........19 GRADE POINT AVERAGE AND CLASS RANK ........................19 GRADE POINT AVERAGE ..............................................19 ACADEMIC CLASS RANK..............................................19 COURSES COUNTED IN CLASS RANK.....................20 WEIGHTED GPA CLASS RANK CALCULATION ......20 CALCULATION SCALE ...........................................21 ADVANCED COURSES............................................22 ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT CLASS RANKING................22 CLASS RANK ........................................................22 TRANSFER STUDENT GRADES ...............................22 EARLY GRADUATES AND BEYOND 4-YEAR CONTINUERS .........................................................22 VALEDICTORIAN AND SALUTATORIAN ................. 22 TOP TEN PERCENT OF GRADUATING CLASS ......... 22 REQUIRED STATE ASSESSMENTS FOR GRADUATION .............. 23 STUDENTS FIRST ENTERING 9TH GRADE DURING 2010-12 OR EARLIER ........................................................................ 23 STUDENTS FIRST ENTERING 9TH GRADE DURING 2011-12 OR LATER ........................................................................... 23 GENERAL INFORMATION ........................................................ 23 GRADE LEVEL CLASSIFICATION ......................................... 23 SCHEDULE CHANGES .......................................................... 23 SEMESTER SYSTEM............................................................. 24 SUSPENSION FROM EXTRACURRICULAR ACTIVITIES........... 24 COLLEGE INFORMATION AUTOMATIC ADMISSIONS TOP TEN PERCENT..................... 24 COLLEGE ENTRANCE EXAMS.............................................. 24 COLLEGE CONNECTION ...................................................... 25 CLEP.................................................................................. 25 GRADUATION GRADE LEVEL PLANNING CHART .................... 26 GRADUATION PLANNING WORKSHEET................................... 27 HIGH SCHOOL COURSE DESCRIPTIONS INDEPENDENT STUDIES....................................................... 28 LANGUAGE ARTS................................................................ 29 READING............................................................................. 33 MATHEMATICS ................................................................... 35 SCIENCES............................................................................ 41 SOCIAL STUDIES ................................................................. 47 OCCUPATIONAL INVESTIGATIONS....................................... 52 ADDITIONAL ELECTIVES..................................................... 53 LANGUAGES OTHER THAN ENGLISH................................... 55 HEALTH AND P.E................................................................ 57 FINE ARTS .......................................................................... 62 COMMUNICATION ............................................................... 73 CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION .................................. 74 AGRICULTURE, FOOD & NATURAL RESOURCES ................. 75 ARCHITECTURE & CONSTRUCTION..................................... 78 ARTS, A/V TECHNOLOGY & COMMUNICATIONS ................ 79 BUSINESS, MANAGEMENT & ADMINISTRATION.................. 82 EDUCATION & TRAINING.................................................... 84 HEALTH SCIENCE................................................................ 85 HOSPITALITY & TOURISM................................................... 87 HUMAN SERVICES............................................................... 88 INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY.............................................. 89 LAW, PUBLIC SAFETY, CORRECTIONS & SECURITY............ 91 NJROTC ............................................................................ 92 SCIENCE, TECH, ENGINEERING & MATHEMATICS............... 93 TRANSPORTATION, DISTRIBUTION & LOGISTICS................. 95 INDEX OF HIGH SCHOOL COURSES........................................... 97 APPENDIX A ADVANCED COURSES........................................ 100
  4. 4. 4 Student Services Core Academics Core academic classes provide instruction in all State-mandated Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) through the Board approved GISD curriculum requirements. The TEKS identify what Texas students should know and be able to do at every grade and in every course. The State Board of Education has adopted the TEKS as the standard curriculum for all Texas schools. Core academic classes provide a solid education for students as they prepare to enter post-secondary education, technical job preparation programs and/or the workforce. The Texas Education Code requires students to master the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) in English Language Arts/Reading, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies and PE. The TEKS curriculum provides students with learning objectives called Student Expectations (SE). Mastery of the TEKS curriculum is measured in the core academic classes through the students’ performance on the State-mandated Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) and the STAAR End-of-Course Exams. Learning in the core academic classes focuses on comprehension, application, analysis and synthesis of subject area content, processes and skills. Pre-Advanced Placement and Advanced Placement Programs The College Board’s Advanced Placement Program offers high school students an opportunity to take college-level courses. Upon successful completion of the course, the student receives high school credit with honors; and, if the student takes the AP exam and scores in an acceptable range, advanced placement, credit, or both may be awarded upon college entrance. Pre-AP courses contain the levels of rigor necessary to provide readiness for the increased difficulty of the high school AP classes. Formal identification is not required to participate in Pre-AP and/or Advanced Placement courses. Careful consideration of the time demands of extracurricular activities, employment, community service, homework and other activities should be considered. If you have questions regarding whether or not this is the right course for you/your student, please contact your student’s teacher, counselor or campus administrator. To learn more about Pre-AP courses, please go to the following link: http://apcentral.collegeboard.com. Please read the Pre-AP Request Form carefully before requesting Pre-AP courses. Consultation with the prior/current year teacher and school counselor is recommended, although not required, before requesting Pre-AP courses. GISD is committed to the principle that all students deserve an opportunity to participate in academically challenging courses and programs. All students who are willing to accept the challenge may enroll in Pre-AP courses. It is recommended, but not required, that students who elect to take AP courses participate in Pre-AP courses in 9th -10th grades. All Pre-AP and AP courses are listed in the Course Descriptions section of this Course Catalog. A minimum enrollment of 10 students is required for the class to be offered. Endorsements The Foundation Plus Endorsement High School Program (FEHSP) offers students the opportunity to earn an endorsement, or major course of study. The endorsement offers a student the ability to earn a total of 28 total credits (a combination of core requirements, local req uirements and endorsement electives) in a targeted area of study for high school graduation. The five endorsement options for students are Arts and Humanities, Business and Industry, Public Service, STEM (Science and Math), and Multidisciplinary Career and Technical Education Career and Technical Education in Georgetown I.S.D. is focused on meeting the individual needs of all students by providing curricula to meet the demands of our 21st Century global economy. It is the goal of Georgetown’s Career and Technical Education Program to provide for relevant, career-related experiences and rigorous, high-quality academic instruction to ensure that each and every student attains mastery of the knowledge and skills necessary to achieve a lifetime of success. Georgetown ISD aligns with the Achieve Texas initiative to provide students with a rigorous and relevant high school experience based upon high academic standards and cutting-edge technical instruction supported through real-world connectivity and hands-on experience.
  5. 5. 5 All students have the opportunity to enroll in Career and Technical Education courses along with the more traditional academic courses. Enrollment in Career and Technical Education courses is open to all qualified students without regard to race, color, creed, religious affiliation, sex or handicapping conditions. Credit by Examination Students may earn high school credit through the successful completion of a credit by exam. A student in Grades 6–12, who has had sufficient prior formal instruction as determined by the District on the basis of a review of the student’s educational records and who has failed a course, may gain credit for the course by passing a State- approved proficiency examination. Students must score 70% or better on the test. A student in grades 6-12 will be given credit for an academic subject in which he or she has had no prior instruction if the student scores 90% on a criterion-referenced test for the applicable course. If a student is given credit in a subject on the basis of an examination, the school district must enter the examination score on the student's transcript. Although it is used in calculating the GPA in eligible courses, it is not used in computing class rank. A student may not use this examination to regain eligibility to participate in extracurricular activities. Students must also take any required STAAR End-of-Course exams. Summer School Certain courses are offered during summer school for credit recovery and/or STAAR/TAKS remediation. Selected students (based upon their performance on their most recent STAAR/TAKS tests) should enroll in summer school. The number of students enrolled determines actual courses offered. Contact the campus principal’s office for more information. Summer school information should be available at campuses in April, prior to the June start date. Courses taken during summer school are counted for credit only and are recorded as a P (Pass) or F (Fail). Gifted and Talented (GT) Services The Georgetown Independent School District is committed to providing an appropriate education for all students. The district believes that highly able students exist at all age levels and in all ethnic and socioeconomic groups. The purpose of the GT program is to provide learning experiences that meet the educational needs of students whose academic and/or intellectual abilities and thinking processes are significantly advanced for their ages. These students have opportunities to demonstrate self-directed learning, analytical thinking, and highly developed communication skills as evidenced by advanced and innovative products and presentations. Instruction for gifted students focuses on pacing, depth, and complexity. Although Pre-Advanced Placement and Advanced Placement courses are open to all students desiring a challenge, GT courses are for identified gifted and talented students. Teachers of GT students are trained in methods of differentiating for gifted students and will provide opportunities for identified gifted students to demonstrate their abilities. The GT courses provide GT identified students with enriched TEKS-based curriculum and opportunities. At the high school level, there are independent study courses that meet the requirements for the Gifted/Talented State Performance Standards Research Projects: Independent Study in Mathematics, and Capstone Research in selected disciplines. (See Course Descriptions under Independent Studies: Capstone Research Courses.) Gifted students are highly encouraged to participate in these courses. Other service options appropriate for gifted/talented students include academic competitions, academic clubs, Distinguished Achievement Program, dual/concurrent enrollment with Austin Community College, distance learning, as well as credit for acceleration, early high school graduation, and a high-quality performing arts program. Please contact the campus guidance office for additional information. Services for English Language Learners It is the policy of the State of Texas that every student in the State who has a home language other than English and is identified as limited English proficient (LEP) shall be provided a full opportunity to participate in an English as a second language (ESL) program. The ESL program shall emphasize the mastery of English language skills as well as mathematics, science, and social studies to enable LEP students to participate equitably in school. Both Georgetown High School and East View High School have ESL classes that are part of the English/Language Arts Department. Students receive TEKS-based curriculum utilizing individualized instructional approaches such as sheltered instruction in other content area courses. Courses are offered to students based on the Limited English Proficiency Committee (LPAC) recommendations.
  6. 6. 6 Courses designated with GM, M, T, Skills T Based on the TEKS of the general education courses, these courses are modified to meet the individual learning requirements of students. Students are enrolled in these courses through ARD Committee placement. These courses review and build on basic skills and ideas of core academic subject matter. The scope of these courses and TEKS mastered is determined by the student’s Individual Education Plan (IEP). Students in the courses will take the required End-of-Course exams. Courses designated with G, Inclusion, Basic Courses designated with G or Inclusion indicate that the student receives special education support within a general education classroom. Students in G courses will take the End-of-Course STAAR tests. Students in inclusion and Basic will continue to take the required TAKS tests. Special Education Services Each local school has the responsibility for providing educational and related services to eligible students in the least restrictive environment. Students with disabilities have the opportunity to participate in educational programs and activities with students without disabilities. If a student has or is suspected of having a disability and requires specially designed instruction that can only be provided through special education, parents, teacher, administrators, or any other district employee should contact a campus counselor for information concerning the special education referral process. The school district curriculum enables each student with disabilities to acquire knowledge and skills in the basic areas of learning commensurate with the student’s needs and abilities. These skills may be attained in the general program of instruction or through special education modifications, accommodations, or instruction and related services, as determined by the admission, review, and dismissal (ARD) committee. Students with disabilities shall have available an instructional day commensurate with that of students without disabilities. The ARD committee shall determine the appropriate instructional setting for each student, and these shall be specified in the student’s Individual Educational Plan (IEP). The secondary program of a student receiving Special Education services shall terminate either with graduation or when the student no longer meets the age requirement for eligibility. Graduation constitutes a release from services and is a change in placement. Section 504 Services Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act prohibits discrimination and assures that disabled students have educational opportunities and benefits equal to those provided to non-disabled students. Eligible students have a record of, or are regarded as having, a physical or mental impairment which substantially limits one or more major life activities including functions such as learning, self-care, walking, seeing, hearing, speaking, breathing, working, and/or performing manual tasks. In order to receive services, even if the student has a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits a major life activity such as learning, communicating, or breathing, the student should be referred to the campus Section 504 team to determine appropriate and reasonable accommodations within the school. If a student has or is suspected of having a disability or requires special services, parents, teachers, administrators or any other district employee should contact the campus counselor for information. Dyslexia Services GISD offers services for students who, after participating in a screening process, are identified as dyslexic. The Dyslexia services are designed to provide comprehensive reading, writing, and spelling instruction for students who have been identified as dyslexic. The program provides a continuum of services that address phonemic awareness, grapho-phonemic knowledge, language structure, and linguistic patterns and processes. The Section 504 committee on each campus determines placement in the dyslexia program. TEC 38.003 Accelerated Learning (ACCELL) Any student who is at risk of failing as evidenced by multiple measures (such as STAAR/TAKS Reading or Mathematics scores, classroom grades, benchmark assessments, etc.) must participate in ACCELL Services. Students who qualify for ACCELL will receive one or more of the following services: tutorials, study skills, supplemental reading/writing, supplemental mathematics, dyslexia services, or other customized instructional support services. The delivery of ACCELL services will be customized based on students’ identified needs. The purpose of the ACCELL program is to assist students in mastery of the TEKS (State-mandated curriculum) through additional instruction on specific learning objectives for which students have not demonstrated mastery.
  7. 7. 7 Required STAAR/TAKS /EOC Preparation Courses Any student (9-12) who fails any portion of the State assessment will be required to take a preparation course in lieu of an elective per Chapter 29 of the Texas Education Code. A student who fails any portion of the State assessment tests is considered by State statute as “at-risk” for dropping out of school. GISD must provide each student who does not pass STAAR/TAKS with accelerated instruction that will enable the student to perform at grade level at the conclusion of the next regular school term and a personal graduation plan to graduate on time. TEC 29.081 (a) and (b). Planning for College and Career Readiness National, state, and local attention is focused on raising educational expectations for high school students. Simply stated, all students must graduate from high school well prepared for college and a career. Nationally, the current administration is restructuring the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) in order to support both state and local efforts to help ensure student success after high school graduation. States are being asked to ensure that the academic standards in the high school classroom will better prepare students to succeed in college and the workplace. The State of Texas has embraced the national challenge and is often seen as a national leader in its efforts to ensure that its high school students’ graduate from high school prepared for the challenges of postsecondary education and career. State standards for career and college readiness were jointly created by representatives from Texas public education, post-secondary education, and business community stakeholders. Georgetown Independent School District is committing resources to preparing all students for non-remedial coursework when entering a post-secondary program as well as supporting educational experiences through individualized, rigorous Programs of Study that will help prepare all students for college and ensure those who enter the workforce after high school completion will have had relevant postsecondary training and access to industry-recognized certifications. Defining College and Career Readiness College and career readiness means that our students will make a seamless transition between high school and college or the workforce. It also refers to the knowledge and skills students must demonstrate in the four critical areas of English, mathematics, science, and social studies, including reading, writing, critical thinking, and problem solving. College Ready College is typically thought of as a place where a student pursues a four-year bachelor’s degree. College today is a very broad terminology. If a student is college ready, he/she is prepared for any postsecondary education or training, including studying at two- and four-year institutions leading to a terminal degree such as certification, licensure, an Associate’s degree and/or a Bachelor’s degree. Being truly ready for college means that a high school graduate will have the academic, technical, and employability knowledge and skills necessary to enroll in and succeed in college without remediation in credit-bearing first-year postsecondary courses. Career Ready Careers are not just as a means to a paycheck. Students entering a career must have the same skills as a college ready student in order to succeed in postsecondary on-the-job experiences and education necessary to be successful in a chosen career area. Career ready students will have access to a variety of post-secondary opportunities and may choose to enroll in technical programs, community college or experience apprenticeships. Ultimately, the goal is for ALL students to enter a career. Careers provide a family-sustaining salary and provide pathways for career advancement in career areas that are projected to grow in the next five to ten years. Georgetown Independent School District is committed to preparing our students for success in a global economy. Regardless of student race, ethnic or language background, or disability, Georgetown ISD students will graduate from high school ready for college and a career. Further, we are dedicated to allowing our students access to a well- rounded education in order to prepare them to contribute as citizens in our community. A career-ready person effectively navigates pathways that connect education and employment to achieve a fulfilling, financially-secure and successful career. A career is more than just a job. Career readiness has no defined endpoint. To be career ready in our ever-changing global economy requires adaptability and a commitment to
  8. 8. 8 lifelong learning, along with mastery of key academic, technical and workplace knowledge, skills and dispositions that vary from one career to another and change over time as a person progresses along a developmental continuum. Knowledge, skills and dispositions that are inter-dependent and mutually reinforcing are required. Defining the 4-Year Planning Process Four-year planning means planning out high school courses to take in order to (a) complete high school graduation requirements (b) gain perspective on post-secondary opportunities. The benefits to four-year-planning are limitless, but include awareness of your progress regarding general requirements and gaining a sense of direction. There are two things your student should keep in mind when considering four-year planning. First, with enough advanced planning, students will be able to fit in all of the requirements they need to graduate in four years. Second, four-year planning should be thought of as an ongoing process. It is normal for a student to change their plan as new opportunities develop or as roadblocks arise. Four-year planning is extremely helpful in putting the high school experience in perspective, looking at the future and realizing the possibilities that exist beyond high school. All Georgetown I.S.D. high school students will have the opportunity to create an individualized four-year Program of Study with counselors. Counselors will then monitor and adjust each student’s Program of Study annually. Students and Parents will have the opportunity to make changes during this annual review process and within the timeframe for schedule/course changes. Please follow your campus’ policy regarding course schedule/course changes.
  9. 9. 9 Georgetown Independent School District For Ninth Grade Classes of 2014-15 and Thereafter GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS I. Students in GISD must complete a minimum of 28 credits at East View High School/ Georgetown High School and 26 credits at Richarte High School to receive a high school diploma. All credits must be completed in grades 9-12, except high school courses satisfactorily completed in grades 7 and/or 8. The Texas Education Agency requires 26 credits. All courses used to meet State graduation requirements must be selected from State Board of Education (SBOE)-approved courses, with the exception of some elective credits which may be locally approved. II. All courses in this catalog are State Board-approved unless noted as Local Credit Only. Locally developed electives (Local Credit Only) have been designed to meet an identified GISD need or interest. In grades 9-12, a student must complete all graduation requirements and pass the State required exit level exams before he/she is awarded a diploma. III. It is the student and parent’s responsibility to see that the requirements for graduation from high school are met. If you have any question about courses, registration, State-required exit level exams or other graduation requirements, contact the campus guidance department. IV. Since entrance requirements vary greatly from college to college, students who are college-bound should carefully consider high school course selections and investigate college entrance requirements prior to selecting their graduation plan. V. Since employers have varying needs and requirements, students who are career-bound should carefully consider high school course selections and strive to meet future employment requirements by selecting an appropriate graduation plan. See Appendix B, page 101, for Graduation Plans for Ninth Grade Classes of 2013-14 and Prior Foundation High School Program (22 Credits) • 4 credits English: ELA I, II, III, one credit in any advanced English course • 3 credits Mathematics: Algebra I, Geometry, one credit in any advanced math course • 3 credits Science: Biology, one credit in IPC or in any advanced science course, any advanced science course • 3 credits Social Studies: World Geography or World History (1 credit), U.S. History (1 credit), Government (0.5 credit), Economics (0.5 credit) • 2 credits in the same language: World Languages or Computer Programming • 1 credit Physical Education • 1 credit Fine Arts • 5 credits in Elective Courses (0.5 credit Health course required in GISD, leaving 4.5 elective credits available) Foundation + Endorsements (28 Credits) • 4 credits English: ELA I, II, III, one credit in any advanced English course • 4 credits Mathematics: Algebra I, Geometry, two credits in any advanced math course except STEM • 4 credits Science: Biology, one credit in IPC or in any advanced science course, any two advanced science courses • 3 credits Social Studies: World Geography or World History (1 credit), U.S. History (1 credit), Government (0.5 credit), Economics (0.5 credit) • 2 credits in the same language: World Languages or Computer Programming • 1 credit Physical Education • 1 credit Fine Arts • 9 credits in Elective Courses (0.5 credit Health course required in GISD, leaving 8.5 elective credits available) Meet curriculum requirements for at least 1 endorsement Distinguished Level of Achievement (28 Credits) • 4 credits English: ELA I, II, III, one credit in any advanced English course • 4 credits Mathematics: Algebra I, Geometry, two credits in any advanced math course (must include credit in Algebra II) • 4 credits Science: Biology, one credit in IPC or in any advanced science course, any two advanced science courses • 3 credits Social Studies: World Geography or World History (1 credit), U.S. History (1 credit), Government (0.5 credit), Economics (0.5 credit) • 2 credits in the same language: World Languages or Computer Programming • 1 credit Physical Education • 1 credit Fine Arts • 9 credits in Elective Courses (0.5 credit Health course required in GISD, leaving 8.5 elective credits available) Meet curriculum requirements for at least 1 endorsement
  10. 10. 10 HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS I. High School Graduation Programs GISD offers students the opportunity to choose among State-mandated graduation requirement plans. Since entrance requirements vary greatly from college to college and employers have varying needs and requirements, students should carefully consider high school course selections and investigate post-secondary entrance and entry level employment requirements prior to selecting their graduation plan. Foundation High School Program The Foundation High School Program (FHSP) fulfills entrance requirements for most colleges and universities in the State of Texas and provides challenging academic courses. Foundation Plus Endorsement High School Program The Foundation Plus Endorsement High School Program (FEHSP) offers students the opportunity to earn an endorsement, or major course of study. The endorsement offers a student the ability to earn a total of 28 total credits (a combination of core requirements, local requirements and endorsement electives) in a targeted area of study for high school graduation. The five endorsement options for students are:  Arts and Humanities  Business and Industry  Public Service  STEM (Science and Math)  Multidisciplinary Distinguished Level of Achievement High School Program The Distinguished Level of Achievement High School Program (DLAHSP) recognizes students who complete the Foundation High School Program, complete an endorsement, and take Algebra II. Students must also complete an advanced measure requirement. Any combination of four of the following will meet the advanced measure requirements: Test data:  A score of three or above on The College Board Advanced Placement examination;  A score of four or above on an International Baccalaureate examination;  A score on the PSAT that qualifies a student for recognition as a Commended Scholar or higher by the National Merit Scholarship Corporation (NMSC); as part of the National Hispanic Scholar Program of the College Board; or as a part of the National Achievement Scholarship Program for Outstanding Negro Students of the NMSC. College Courses:  A grade of B or a GPA of 3.0 or higher on courses that count for college credit, including articulated credit courses, dual credit courses, and co-enrollment courses. Original research/project: (Original research/ projects may not be used for more than two of the four advanced measures.)  Judged by a panel of professionals in the field that is the focus of project; or  Conducted under the direction of mentor(s) and reported to an appropriate audience;  Related to the required curriculum set forth in TAC 74,1 relating to Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) Examples of Advanced Measures: Student completed course requirements and:  Four AP exams with scores of three or higher ;  One AP exam with a grade of three or higher, two college courses with a 3.0 GPA and a one-year mentorship program conducting a school-approved research product; or  A two-year science project reviewed by hospital board, one college science course with a 3.4 GPA and earned designation as a National Merit Scholar.
  11. 11. 11 II. Graduation Credits Required Credits Students must earn a minimum of 28 credits at GHS and EVHS and 26 credits at Richarte High School to meet GISD graduation credit requirements. Credits and Records GISD shall accept all credits earned toward State graduation requirements by students in accredited Texas school districts, including credits earned in accredited summer school programs, in Texas Youth Commission education programs, and in juvenile justice alternative education programs. Credits earned in local credit courses may be transferred at the district’s discretion. Transfer students shall not be prohibited from attending school pending receipt of transcripts or academic records from the district the student previously attended. Records and transcripts of students from Texas nonpublic schools, from out of state or out of country schools (including foreign exchange students), private schools, and home schools shall be evaluated, and students shall be placed promptly in appropriate classes. The district may use a variety of methods to verify the content of courses for which a transfer student has earned credit. Upon enrollment in GISD, the academic advisor awards credits based on available student records and documentation. If necessary, the academic advisor may use a variety of methods for validation of credit that include, but are not limited to: released TAKS exams, recommendations from sending schools, credit by examinations, curriculum review, and course equivalency evaluation. III. Physical Education Substitute Credits A student may not earn more than four credits in physical education toward State graduation requirements. Students may substitute certain physical activities for Physical Education. The school district may allow a student to substitute certain physical activities for the required credits in physical education, including the Foundations of Personal Fitness. The substitutions must be based on the physical activity involved in drill team, marching band and cheerleading during the fall semester; Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps (JROTC); athletics; and appropriate private or commercially-sponsored physical activity programs conducted on or off campus. Outside appropriate private or commercially-sponsored physical activity programs can be substituted for PE with written approval from the district. Forms for requesting substitution of PE credit may be obtained in the counseling and guidance center at the campus. A school district may award up to four credits for appropriate private or commercially-sponsored physical activity programs conducted on or off campus which may be substituted for State graduation credit in physical education. Such approval may be granted under the following conditions:  Olympic-level participation and/or competition including a minimum of 15 hours per week of highly intensive, professional, supervised training.  Private or commercially-sponsored and off-campus physical activities certified by the superintendent and well supervised by appropriately trained instructors. Student participation of at least five hours per week must be required. Instructors of such programs must submit the student’s grades in writing to the registrar by the first day of December and/or the first day of May in order for the student to receive credit for that semester. All grades will be recorded as Pass/Fail. IV. TAKS Exit-Level Exam Requirement for Graduation (Not for students entering high school 2011 or later): Texas State law has mandated that all non-exempt students must pass the exit-level test in order to receive a diploma. The exit-level TAKS (Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills) that contains tests of English Language Arts, Mathematics, Science and Social Studies is administered each spring to all students in Grade 11. If a student does not pass a portion of the test, the failed portion of the test may be retaken each time the TAKS is administered on designated days during the fall, spring, and summer. After a student passes all sections of the test and meets all other graduation requirements, a diploma will be awarded. V. End-of-Course Assessments The Texas Education Agency implemented the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness program beginning with ninth grade students in the 2011-2012 school year. Students entering high school in 2014-2015 must show mastery on the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills by achieving specified performance levels on five End-of-Course (EOC) tests before they graduate. Passing Requirements Students not meeting the passing score on any EOC test must retake the EOC assessment. Students not meeting passing requirements may retake the EOC assessments as many times as the tests are offered.
  12. 12. 12 ACADEMIC PROGRAM INFORMATION I. Richarte High School Richarte High School is the academic, alternative school of choice for GISD. Richarte is registered as a State-accredited alternative campus with TEA. It is not a disciplinary campus, and students are not placed there by any other agency or school. Richarte offers students the opportunity to choose among State-mandated graduation requirement plans. Since entrance requirements vary greatly from college to college and employers have varying needs and requirements, students should carefully consider high school course selections and investigate post-secondary entrance and entry level employment requirements prior to selecting their graduation plan. Richarte HS does not offer a GED program. RHS serves students in grades 10-12 and a minimum age of 16 is required to apply. Teachers teach from the district adopted curriculum and use the same textbooks as other secondary campuses in GISD. The delivery of instruction, course syllabi, goal setting, and high level of student accountability allows students to move through requirements for some courses with flexibility, depending on the learning style and each individual student’s rate of mastering the content and concepts in each course. Students who attend RHS are considered at-risk for a myriad of factors including, but not limited to credit deficiency, difficulty succeeding in a traditional school environment, illness, family issues, or teen parenthood. Richarte seeks to prevent students from dropping out of school as well as to recover those who have already left the school system. A cap and gown graduation ceremony is held at the completion of each year at the Performing Arts Center located at Georgetown High School. Each graduating class has a valedictorian, salutatorian, and class rank. Valedictorian and Salutatorian/Honor Grad Selection The student making the highest four-year scholastic grade point weighted average is declared the valedictorian of the graduating class, provided he/she is enrolled, in regular attendance, and is a graduating senior. The student making the second highest four-year scholastic weighted average is declared the salutatorian of the graduating class provided he/she is enrolled, in regular attendance, and is a graduating senior. Both the salutatorian and valedictorian are declared toward the end of the last grading cycle of the fourth year. Students must complete their last, entire semester at Richarte High School. Any transferred grades not in numerical form and not available in numerical form will be granted mid-point scale. Early graduates are not eligible to be valedictorian or salutatorian. Semester grades of all subjects undertaken in grades 9-12 are used in calculating the four-year scholastic average with the following exceptions: driver education, student aide, athletics, physical education, choir, band, applied music, vocal ensemble, drill team, correspondence courses and co-op work periods. Summer school grades are not used in calculating the scholastic average; students receive credit only. Audited courses and courses repeated for review will not count for credit, but will be included in the scholastic average. II. Early Graduation A student may choose to graduate from high school in fewer than four years. To pursue early graduation, a student must make a written request to the academic advisor. Early graduation requirements include parent approval, principal approval, and a meeting with the counselor to file a written early graduation plan. III. College Preparatory and Credit Programs College preparatory courses are offered to students in subject areas at every grade level. These courses are designed for any and all students who have a desire to pursue a rigorous study in any subject area and want rigorous preparation for college. A. Pre-Advanced Placement and Advanced Placement Programs The College Board’s Advanced Placement Program offers high school students an opportunity to take college-level courses at the local high school. Upon successful completion of the course, the student receives high school credit with honors and, if the student takes the AP exam and scores in an acceptable range, advanced placement, credit, or both may be awarded upon college entrance. Although not required, GISD students enrolled in AP courses are expected to take the AP exam(s) at the completion of the course. Although college credit is a potential benefit of the AP course and exam, the experience alone, regardless of credit awarded, is beneficial to the college-bound student as a pre-college experience. Costs of these exams are borne by the student; however, financial assistance is available. For further information regarding the College Board AP Program at your high school, see a school counselor. It is recommended, but not required that students who elect to take AP courses participate in Pre-AP courses in 9th -11th grades. All Pre-AP and AP courses are listed in the Course Descriptions section of this Course Catalog. A minimum enrollment of 10 students is required for the class to be offered The AP Program also offers the AP International Diploma for students who plan to apply to an overseas university. For further information regarding the College Board AP Program at your high school, see a school counselor.
  13. 13. 13 Eligibility Recommendations Pre-AP courses contain the levels of rigor necessary and provide readiness for the increased difficulty of the high school AP classes. Formal identification is not required to participate in Pre-AP and/or Advanced Placement courses. Careful consideration of the time demands of extracurricular activities, employment, community service, homework and other activities should be considered. If you have questions regarding whether or not this is the right course for you/your student, please contact your student’s teacher, counselor/academic advisor or campus administrator. To learn more about the Pre-AP and Advanced Placement programs go to: http://apcentral.collegeboard.com B. Early College Start - ACC Early College Start at Austin Community College allows juniors and seniors the opportunity to earn college credit while in high school. These courses are “dual credit” if used to satisfy the high school graduation requirement, “co- enrollment” if taken for college credit only, or “credit-in-escrow” if part of an approved ACCTech Articulation Agreement. Early College Start a good thing to consider for the following reasons:  Students get a head start on earning college credit.  Tuition and fees will be waived or reduced.  College-level work can enhance self-esteem, education, and career goals.  Most courses are transferable to other public colleges and universities. Students may enroll in college while still enrolled in high school to extend learning or accumulate college hours. To take college courses (co-enrollment or dual enrollment), students must receive counselor and parent approval and complete the college admissions requirements including college entrance exams and are responsible for the application and registration process. This process is time sensitive and may take one to four weeks to complete. Students must be considered full-time high school students. Students may enroll in two courses per college semester beginning the summer following their sophomore year. Students are responsible for any expenses associated with the course, including textbooks. Students should check with universities to ensure acceptance of specific dual or co-enrollment courses. All co-enrollment, dual credit and articulated courses may meet criteria for advanced measures in the Distinguished Achievement Program. Several Austin Community College (ACC) courses are offered during the school day and evenings at the ACC Georgetown Center (GTC) located on the GHS and EVHS campus. Other options are available outside of the school day. ACC classes are free—no tuition or fees are charged to high school students enrolled in the program on a GISD high school campus or on another local-area high school campus. There is a fee for each ACC course taken by distance learning or on an ACC campus. C. Dual Credit Enrollment Credit earned through dual credit enrollment counts for both college and high school credit. To receive credit, the grade in the course must be a D or better and students must submit an official transcript to the high school counseling office. The grade must be a B or better to use as an advanced measure on the Distinguished Achievement Program. If all conditions are met, credit is given for the course. GISD will follow the State requirements for the calculation of each student’s GPA. Listed in the chart found on the following two pages are the courses that are currently approved for dual credit with Austin Community College. This list is subject to change. Any college level course that a student completes can count as at least .5 elective credit for high school graduation requirements. Students should check with the campus guidance office for the most recent list of approved courses. D. Co-Enrollment Credit earned through co-enrollment counts only for college credit. Students who are granted release time for co-enrollment must meet all district requirements for graduation. Co-enrollment courses do not appear on a student’s high school transcript, do not count for high school graduation, and are not included in a student’s GPA, but will count as an advanced measure under the Distinguished Achievement Program if the student earned a B or higher grade for the course. The Texas Legislature has approved 42 core lower- division course credit hours that if completed through dual or co-enrollment will transfer to any Texas public college or university. This list can be found on the Austin Community College website. Students who plan to attend private or out of State schools should check with the schools on their policies of accepting dual or concurrent enrollment courses.
  14. 14. 14 ACC # ACC Title High School Course HS Credit ACCT 2301 Principles of Financial Accounting Accounting I 1 ARTC 1402 Digital Imaging I Digital and Interactive Media 1 ARTS 1301 Introduction to Visual Arts Art I 1 ARTS 1303 Art History I Art History 1 ARTS 1316 Drawing I Art II-Drawing 1 ARTS 1317 Drawing II* Art III-Drawing 1 ARTS 2323 Life Drawing I* Art III-Drawing 1 ARTS 2316 Painting I* Art II-Painting 1 ARTS 2317 Painting II* Art III-Painting 1 ARTS 2326 Sculpture I Art II-Sculpture 1 ARTS 2327 Sculpture II* Art III-Sculpture 1 ARTS 2346 Ceramics I Art II-Ceramics 1 ARTS 2347 Ceramics II* Art III-Ceramics 1 ARTS 2356 Photography I* Art II-Photography 1 ARTS 2357 Photography II* Art II-Photography 1 ASTR 1303 Stellar Astronomy Astronomy 1 ASTR 1304 Solar System Astronomy Astronomy 1 BCIS 1305 Business Computer Applications Business Info Management I 1 BIO 1614 Field Biology Environmental Systems 1 BIOL 2304 Human Anatomy* Anatomy and Physiology .5 BIOL 2305 Human Physiology* Anatomy and Physiology .5 BMGT 1303 Principles of Management Business Management (BUSMGMT) .5 BUSI 2301 Business Law Business Law .5 CETT 1403 DC Circuits* DC Circuits .5 CETT 1405 AC Circuits* AC Circuits .5 CHEM 1411 General Chemistry I Chemistry I 1 COMM 1307 Introduction to Mass Communication Journalism .5 COSC 1301 Personal Computing Business Info Management I 1 COSC 1315 Fundamentals of Programming Computer Science I 1 COSC 1320 C++ Programming* Computer Science II-1st sem. (TACS2) .5 COSC 2415 Data Structures* Computer Science II-2nd sem. .5 CRIJ 1301 Introduction to Criminal Justice Tech. Technical Intro. to Criminal Justice .5 CRIJ 1306 Court Systems and Practices Courts and Criminal Procedures .5 CRIJ 1307 Crime In America Crime in America .5 CRIJ 1310 Fundamentals of Criminal Law Fundamentals of Criminal Law 1 CRIJ 2314 Criminal Investigation Criminal Investigation .5 DANC 1141 Ballet I Dance I 1 DANC 1147 Jazz Dance I Dance 1 DANC 1201 Dance composition Dance I 1 DANC 1245 Modern Dance Dance 1 DFTG 1405 Technical Drafting Intro to Engineering Design 1 DFTG 1417 Architectural-Residential* Architectural Graphics 1 DRAM 1330 Stagecraft Technical Theater 1 DRAM 1351 Acting I Theater Arts I 1 DRAM 1352 Acting II* Theater Arts II 1 DRAM 2331 Stagecraft II* Technical Theatre II 1 DRAM 2351 Acting III* Theatre Arts III 1 ECO 2301 Principles of Macroeconomics Economics .5 ECON 2302 Principles of Microeconomics Adv. Social Studies .5 ENGL 1301 English Composition I English III A .5 ENGL 1302 English Composition II English III B .5 ENGL 2307 Creative writing Creative Writing .5 ENGL 2322 British Literature I* English IV A&B (if yellow book completed) 1 ENGL 2323 British Literature II* English IV .5 ENGL 2327 American Literature I* English III .5 ENGL 2328 American Literature II* English III .5 ENVR 1301 Intro to Environmental Science Environmental Systems 1 FREN 1511 French I French I 1 FREN 1512 French II* French II 1 FREN 2311 French III* French III 1 FREN 2312 French IV* French IV 1 GEOG 1301 Physical Geography World Geography A .5
  15. 15. 15 ACC # ACC Title High School Course HS Credit GEOG 1302 Cultural Geography World Geography B .5 GEOL 1403 Physical Geology Geology .5 GEOL 1404 Historical Geology Geology .5 GERM 1511 German I German I 1 GERM 1512 German II* German II 1 GERM 2311 German III* German III 1 GERM 2312 German IV* German IV 1 GOV 2305 U.S. Government Government .5 GOVT 2306 Texas State and Local Government Adv. Social Studies .5 HIST 1301 United States History I (to 1876) Adv. Social Studies .5 HIST 1302 United States History II (from 1877) U.S. History 1 HPRS 1206 Medical Terminology Medical Terminology .5 HUMA 1301 Introduction to Humanities Humanities .5 IBUS 1305 Intro. to International Business & Trade Global Business .5 IMED 1441 2-D Interface Design Digital and Interactive Media 1 ITSC 1309 Integrated Software Apps. Business Info Management I 1 JAPN 1511 Japanese I Japanese I 1 JAPN 1512 Japanese II* Japanese II 1 JAPN 2311 Japanese III* Japanese III 1 JAPN 2312 Japanese IV* Japanese IV 1 KINE 11XX Physical activity courses PE equivalent I-IV .5 each KINE 1305 Community Health Health Ed .5 LATI 1511 Latin I Latin I 1 LATI 1512 Latin II* Latin II 1 LATI 2311 Latin III* Latin III 1 LATI 2312 Latin IV* Latin IV 1 MATH 1316 Trigonometry Pre-calculus A .5 MATH 2412 Pre-calculus Pre-calculus B .5 MATH 1342 Elementary Statistics Statistics 1 MATH 1425 Business Calculus I AP Calculus A .5 MATH 1476 Business Calculus II AP Calculus B .5 MATH 2413 Calculus I AP Calculus A .5 MATH 2414 Calculus II AP Calculus B .5 MRKG 1311 Principles of Marketing Principles of Marketing .5 PHIL 1301 Introduction to Philosophy Philosophy .5 PHYS 1311 Stellar Astronomy Astronomy 1 PHYS 1312 Solar System Astronomy Astronomy 1 PHYS 1401 General College Physics Physics I 1 PSYC 2301 Introduction to Psychology Psychology .5 SLNG 1401 American Sign Language: Beginning I Sign Language I 1 SLNG 1402 American Sign Language: Beginning II* Sign Language II 1 SNLG 2301 American Sign Language III Sign Language III 1 SNLG 2302 American Sign Language IV Sign Language IV 1 SOCI 1301 Introduction to Sociology Sociology .5 SPAN 1511 Spanish I Spanish I 1 SPAN 1512 Spanish II* Spanish II 1 SPAN 2311 Spanish III* Spanish III 1 SPAN 2312 Spanish IV* Spanish IV 1 SPCH 1311 Intro. to Speech Communications Communications Apps. .5 SPCH 1315 Fundamentals of Public Speaking Public Speaking .5 WLDG 1405 Art Metals Jewelry II 1 *ACC course has prerequisite requirements. Only courses listed in the course guide are pre-approved for dual credit. Other ACC courses may be approved for high school credit. Students should check with the campus guidance office for more information.
  16. 16. 16 E. ACCTech (Formerly referred to as Tech Prep) ACCTech is a program which allows students the opportunity to earn college credit for approved career and technical education (CTE) high school courses and begin a college technical major in high school. In the ACCTech program, students begin a course of study in high school and continue in a community or technical college. The result is a certificate or associate degree in a career field. ACCTech combines the academic courses needed for success in college AND technical courses that begin to prepare you for a career. Through ACCTech, G.I.S.D. is able to achieve program articulation with Austin Community College. Articulation is a planned process linking high school and college courses to assist students in making a smooth transition from one level of education to another without experiencing delays or duplication in learning. Approved ACCTech programs have articulation agreements, which are signed documents that indicate the specific responsibilities of the high school, college, and student. The agreements also include outlines of a Recommended High School Graduation Plan and a two-year associate degree or technical certificate. Together these are called a 6-Year Plan. ACCTech articulated courses are high school courses that contain the same course content as an equivalent college course, and for which a student is eligible for college credit once requirements are met. In order for students to receive articulated college credit through ACCTech, students must:  Enroll in ACCTech (articulated) courses  While taking the ACCTech course in high school, set up an account on the (CATEMA) www.catema.net/capital website  Earn a 3.0 (80) or better in the course  To claim ACCTech credits, enroll at ACC as an Early College Start or traditional student and complete one class (three semester hours)  After you complete one class (three semester hours) as an ACC student, your credit is uploaded from the (CATEMA) www.catema.net/capital website onto your ACC transcript
  17. 17. 17 ACCTech Articulated Course Agreements ACC Course # Austin Community College Title Credit GHS Course Title HS Credit ACNT 1403 Introduction to Accounting I 4 Accounting I 1 ARTC 1402 Digital Imaging I 4 Digital and Interactive Media (DIM) 1 ARTC 1413 Digital Publishing I 4 Web Technologies 1 AUMT 1405 Introduction to Automotive Technology 4 Energy, Power, and Transportation Systems 1 AUMT 1416 AUMT 1407 Suspension & Steering AND Automotive Electrical Systems 4 4 Advanced Automotive Technology 2 AUMT 2417 AUMT 1410 Automotive Engine Performance Analysis I AND Automotive Brake Systems 4 4 Automotive Technology 2 BITC 1411 Introduction to Biotechnology 4 Advanced Biotechnology 1 BMGT 1327 Principles of Management 3 Business Management 1 BUSG 2309 Small Business Management 3 Entrepreneurship 1 CDEC 1321 CDEC 1311 The Infant and Toddler Educating Young Children 3 3 Child Guidance (Required Prerequisite(s): Child Development) 2 .5 CETT 1425 Digital Fundamentals 4 Digital Electronics (PLTW-DE) 1 CHEF 1205 Sanitation and Safety 2 Culinary Arts 2 CHEF 1301 Basic Food Preparation 3 Culinary Arts with ServSafe Certification 2 CJSA 1348 Ethics in Criminal Justice 3 Law 1 1 CRIJ 1301 Introduction to Criminal Justice 3 Principles of Law 1 CRIJ 1310 Law II 3 Fundamentals of Criminal Law 3 CRIJ 1306 Court Systems and Practices 3 Courts and Systems 1 ENGR 1201 Introduction to Engineering 2 Principles of Engineering (PLTW- POE) 1 GRPH 1359 Vector Graphics for Production 4 Graphic Design and Illustration 1 IBUS 1305 International Business & Trade 3 Global Business .5 ITSC 1309 Integrated Software Applications I 3 Business Information Management I (BIM I) OR Business Information Management II (BIM II) 1 1 WLDG 1425 Introduction to Oxy-Fuel Welding and Cutting 4 Agricultural Facilities Design and Fabrication 1 WLDG 1428 Introduction to Shielded Metal Arc Welding 4 Agricultural Mechanics and Metal Technologies 1 Current Georgetown ISD Articulation agreements with Austin Community College may be viewed at: http://www.austincc.edu/acctech/documents/GeorgetownISD.php
  18. 18. 18 Methods to Earn College Credit in High School Comparison Description Advantages Disadvantages The College Board Advanced Placement Program (AP) The College Board Advanced Placement Program is a nationally recognized program for introducing students to college-level work while they are still in high school. Students who enroll in higher-level academic courses identified for Advanced Placement may be eligible to receive college credit based on high school course grades and performance on national AP examinations. Colleges and universities publish policies for award of AP credit or AP advanced placement in their bulletins.  Exposure to college-level coursework  Student AP exam score of 3 or above counts as an advanced measure for the Distinguished Achievement Program  Recognized at colleges and universities nationwide  Large selection of academic courses is included in the AP Program  State-sponsored incentive program for participating school districts  Students receive weighted points toward their class rank  Applies to AP designated academic courses only  College Board AP examination fee required  Students must score a 3 or above on AP exam to count as an advanced measure, potentially delaying award of Distinguished Achievement Seal  Award of credit or advanced placement at colleges and universities varies depending on examination scores  Secondary schools may be limited in AP course offerings and course scheduling options.  ACCTech The ACCTech program was created to provide a method for high school students to receive technical training in high school. Students may begin a workforce/technical program and by successfully demonstrating college-level competence in content-enhanced high school courses are eligible to receive banked (in escrow) credit for courses that are part of an associate degree or certificate plan. Some four-year universities may also honor these courses.  Exposure to college-level coursework while completing high school credits  Course grade of 3.0 (80) or above counts as an advanced measure for the Distinguished Achievement Program  Recognized at many public two and four-year colleges across the State  Large selection of career and technical education courses and some academic courses  Students begin a college technical major in high school  Designed to meet Austin Community College program requirements  Based on courses offered by both the high school and Austin Community College  No tuition and/or fees  Student must earn a 3.0 (80) or better in the course  Credit in escrow until a student completes three semester hours of additional college- level coursework as an Austin Community College student  Transfer of credit to four-year universities may be limited  Secondary schools may be limited in articulated career and technical education or academic course offerings and course scheduling options  Award of credit may depend upon local agreements Early College Start Students may earn college credit through Early College Start program. The Early College Start program allows a junior or senior student to enroll in college while still in high school and register tuition- free or at a reduced tuition rate for college courses that may count for both high school and college credit. Students who participate in the Early College Start program must meet College Readiness Standards.  Exposure to college courses often taught on college campus  Course grade of 3.0 or above counts as an advanced measure for the Distinguished Achievement Program  College credit is awarded on successful completion of course requirements  Early college admission  Enhanced course transferability  Austin Community College waives tuition and fees for courses taken at any high school campus and charges $40 per course for dual credit courses taken at ACC facilities.  Austin Community College offers Junior and Senior level English and Social Studies courses on campus during the school day at Georgetown and Georgetown East View High Schools   Students must meet college admission requirements  Students must meet college basic skills assessment requirements  Students are generally limited to taking two concurrent college courses each semester  Students may be subject to college tuition and fees  Students may need to travel to a college campus Credit by Examination Credit by examination or for experience offers students an opportunity to demonstrate college-level knowledge and earn college credit or advanced placement by examination, or by petitioning a college or university for credit after documentation of appropriate experience. Students demonstrate knowledge by taking College Board CLEP exams (academic courses) or college or university departmental exams (academic and technical courses).  No specific course enrollment required  Students may opt to take an examination for credit at any time  CLEP examination scores accepted at colleges and universities nationwide  Large selection of CLEP examinations for academic courses  High school students can bank CLEP examination scores pending college enrollment  CLEP examinations are offered for academic courses only  CLEP examination fees are required. Colleges may also charge tuition or fees for credit by departmental examination or for experience  Colleges and universities may have different policies regarding award of credit for CLEP examinations  Not all college or university departments offer credit by departmental examination or experience
  19. 19. 19 IV. Alternative Methods for High School Credit Correspondence Courses All high school students may take correspondence courses and earn credit toward graduation. Prior to enrollment in correspondence courses, students must make written request to the principal or designee for approval to enroll in the course through their guidance counselor. Credit toward State graduation requirements shall be granted only under the following conditions: 1. The institution offering the course is The University of Texas, Texas Tech University, the Texas Virtual Network, or other public institution of higher education approved by the Commissioner of Education. AND 2. The correspondence course includes the State-required Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for such a course. GISD will follow State requirements for the calculation of each student’s GPA. Seniors who are enrolled in correspondence courses to earn units required for graduation shall complete the course and submit the grade for recording at least 30 days prior to the graduation date in order to be eligible for graduation at the end of the term. A correspondence course is not considered completed until the final grade is recorded in the registrar’s office at the campus. The costs of correspondence courses are the responsibility of the student and/or the parents/guardians. Note: Correspondence courses are not included in determining NCAA eligibility. V. Grade Point Average and Class Rank Grade Point Average (GPA) GPA is calculated at the end of each semester beginning with the end of the first semester of a student’s freshman year. The Grade Point Average (GPA) is calculated for each student using a simple grading system. Grade points are awarded based on the grading system outlined in the GISD Grading Regulations. A = 90-100 B = 80-89 C = 70-79 F = Failing (Below 70) The GPA is a cumulative average of all semester or final grades earned in selected courses in high school. The semester averages of all State-approved courses and elective courses will be included in the calculation of the GPA with the exception of the following courses: driver education, student aide, cheerleading, test preparation (SAT Prep), athletics, physical education, choir, band, orchestra, dance courses, color guard, drill team, and all pass/fail courses. Summer school grades are not used in calculating the GPA. Audited courses and courses repeated for review will not count for credit, but will not be included in the scholastic average. GPA Calculation Example: 1st semester Pre-AP English I 88 1st semester Algebra I 72 1st semester Athletics 94 1st semester Biology 91 GPA (unweighted) 83.66 The sample GPA is the straight average of the semester grades in English I, Algebra I, and Biology divided by 3 (courses). Athletics does not count in the GPA. The sample GPA is 83.66. The GPA is commonly referred to as an “unweighted” GPA and will provide easily usable information to colleges and universities. Academic Class Rank Calculation A Weighted GPA (WGPA) is used to determine a class rank for each student. Class rank indicates the student’s academic standing relative to his/her peers (Valedictorian, Salutatorian, top ten percent, top quarter, second quarter, third quarter and fourth quarter). An exact numerical class rank is reported for each student. The WGPA is determined by the semester or final grades earned in the courses specified in the GISD class rank policies. Course choice has an impact on class ranking. Students earn grade points for each class they take. The number of grade points earned in the class is determined by the numerical grade earned and by the weighted levels of rigor of specific courses.
  20. 20. 20 Note: The GPA will not necessarily predict a student’s class rank. A student may have a lower GPA, but a higher Weighted GPA class rank than another student due to the courses included and weighted grades for specified courses used in calculating class rank. Courses Counted in Class Rank The District shall calculate a student's class rank using only credits earned in the following content areas as defined by the TEKS:  English  Mathematics  Science  Social Studies  Foreign Language (Languages Other Than English) For students entering grade 9 during the 2011–12 school year and thereafter, class rank shall be determined by descending order of students’ weighted grade point averages earned in the following curriculum categories: 1. Four courses in English/language arts; 2. Up to four courses in mathematics; 3. Four courses in science; 4. Four courses in social studies; and 5. Up to two courses in Languages other than English (LOTE). If a student completes more than 18 courses within these five categories specified above, the student’s weighted GPA used for class rank shall be calculated using the student’s grades within each category with the highest grade point value. Calculations will be based on semesters with each semester of a course counting as ½ credit. Calculations for GPA will include up to the top eight semesters of the four core areas. Grades earned in the following courses shall be excluded when calculating the weighted GPA and academic class rank:  Correspondence courses  Summer school courses  Credit by examination  Credit for acceleration  Credit recovery courses  Home school  Distance learning  Online learning  Courses taken in foreign countries  Pass/fail courses  Private schools and/or non-accredited schools The weighted GPA is determined by semester grades earned in the core courses (English, Math, Science, Social Studies, and Languages Other Than English). Core level courses are calculated based on a 5.0 scale. Advanced academic courses (GT, Pre-AP, AP, dual credit, college courses) are calculated on a 6.0 scale. Elective courses and local credit courses are not included in the calculation of the weighted GPA and academic class rank. Weighted GPA Class Rank Calculation Each course is coded to show its weight based on the following categories: ADVANCED COURSES: These courses include academic courses specifically designated for students identified as Gifted and Talented, College Board Advanced Placement Courses, Pre-Advanced Placement Courses, dual credit, college courses, and other appropriate advanced courses. CORE COURSES: Core courses provide grade-level instruction in 100% of the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) as outlined in the State Board approved well-balanced curriculum. GISD core courses exceed the minimum expectations through various curricular and instructional strategies. These courses are designed for college-bound as well as career-bound students.
  21. 21. 21 MODIFIED COURSES: These courses provide instruction in less than 100% of the TEKS. Modifications are provided through content as well as methodology, pacing, and materials. LOCAL COURSES: No weight is assigned for local courses. For purposes of class rank, a six-point system shall be used to calculate the student’s Weighted GPA. The Weighted GPA determines a student’s rank in class. Students receiving credit for advanced courses will receive an additional grade point. This is reflected in the chart in the column labeled Advanced. Courses that have been modified by the student’s ARD committee as to the required content of the TEKS shall not earn the same number of grade points as core or advanced. This is reflected in the chart below in the column labeled Modified Curriculum. Please see chart below for a calculation example. WGPA for Class Rank Calculation Example: (1) Look at the semester or final average for each course. (2) Determine if the course counts in the WGPA. (3) If so, find that grade on the following chart. (4) Determine whether the course is Modified, Core, or Advanced and use the appropriate grade point for that course. (5) Total the grade points and divide by the number of semester courses counted. This will give you the WGPA that is used in Class Rank. WGPA Calculation Scale for Class Rank Semester Grade Advanced Core Modified Curriculum 100 6.0 5.0 4.0 99 5.9 4.9 3.9 98 5.8 4.8 3.8 97 5.7 4.7 3.7 96 5.6 4.6 3.6 95 5.5 4.5 3.5 94 5.4 4.4 3.4 93 5.3 4.3 3.3 92 5.2 4.2 3.2 91 5.1 4.1 3.1 90 5.0 4.0 3.0 89 4.9 3.9 2.9 88 4.8 3.8 2.8 87 4.7 3.7 2.7 86 4.6 3.6 2.6 85 4.5 3.5 2.5 84 4.4 3.4 2.4 83 4.3 3.3 2.3 82 4.2 3.2 2.2 81 4.1 3.1 2.1 80 4.0 3.0 2.0 79 3.9 2.9 1.9 78 3.8 2.8 1.8 77 3.7 2.7 1.7 76 3.6 2.6 1.6 75 3.5 2.5 1.5 74 3.4 2.4 1.4 73 3.3 2.3 1.3 72 3.2 2.2 1.2 Semester Grade Advanced Core Modified Curriculum 71 3.1 2.1 1.1 70 3.0 2.0 1.0 Below 70 0 0 0 Local courses are not included in weighted GPA and class rank calculations. WGPA for Class Rank Calculation Example: Course Semester Average WGPA Calculation Pre-AP English I Sem. 1 92 5.2 Sem. 2 96 5.6 Pre-AP Biology Sem. 1 86 4.6 Sem. 2 95 5.5 Pre-AP World Geo. Sem. 1 95 5.5 Sem. 2 89 4.9 Geometry Sem. 1 88 3.8 Sem. 2 94 4.4 PE (substitute) Sem. 1 P Art I Sem. 2 95 Dig. & Inter. Media Sem. 1 92 Sem. 2 89 Band Sem. 1 99 Sem. 2 100 Total WGPA Points – 39.5 WGPA .5 Credits - 8 WGPA = Total Points 39.5/8 = 4.9375 GPA = 91.9 GPA is the straight average of semester grades in eligible courses.
  22. 22. 22 Advanced Courses Advanced courses receive an additional grade point for calculation of a student’s GPA. See Appendix A for a listing of advanced courses. Academic Achievement Class Ranking Class Rank High school rank for students seeking automatic admission to a general teaching institution on the basis of their class rank is determined and reported as follows: 1.Class rank shall be based on the end of the eleventh grade, middle of the twelfth grade, or at high school graduation, whichever is most recent at the application deadline. 2.The top ten percent of a high school class shall not contain more than ten percent of the total class size. 3.The student's rank shall be reported by the applicant's high school or school district as a specific number out of a specific number total class size. Class rank shall be determined by the Texas school or school district from which the student graduated or is expected to graduate. 19 TAC 5.5(d) A class rank is computed for students each semester beginning in the ninth grade; however, class ranking for college admission purposes, weighted academic class ranking, shall be based on the end of eleventh grade, middle of twelfth grade, or at high school graduation, whichever is most recent at the application deadline. The final calculation for rank in class will be made at the end of the year using final semester grades. Transfer Student Grades All incoming students' GPAs shall be converted to the system used by the District to determine the GPA and rank in class. Early Graduates and Beyond 4-Year Continuers A student's rank in class shall be determined within the graduating class of the school year in which the student completes all requirements for a diploma, regardless of the number of years the student is enrolled in high school. Valedictorian and Salutatorian The valedictorian and salutatorian shall be selected at the end of the second semester of the senior year. The valedictorian and the salutatorian shall be the two graduating seniors with the highest rank in class (weighted grade point average). To be eligible, a student shall have been enrolled in the District for the entire last four semesters prior to graduation and shall have accrued at least 24 units of State-approved or equivalent credit from a public school. Both the failing grade and the passing grade in courses subsequently retaken and passed, including credit by examination, shall be considered. Students suspended from school, assigned to a DAEP, or expelled from school at the time of graduation may be designated the class valedictorian or salutatorian, but shall not be permitted to participate in the graduation activity resulting in forfeiture of the privilege of giving a speech at the graduation ceremony. To qualify for valedictorian or salutatorian, the student must graduate in no more than, or fewer than, four years. Breaking a Tie for Valedictorian/Salutatorian In case of a tie the following method shall be used to determine who shall be recognized as valedictorian or salutatorian: 1. Compute the weighted grade point average to the maximum number of decimal places in the District computer system to break the tie. 2. If a tie still occurs, the student with the most AP courses shall be considered valedictorian or salutatorian. If a tie still occurs, the student with the highest numerical weighted grade averages of all Advanced Placement courses taken shall be valedictorian or salutatorian. Top Ten Percent of a Graduating Class All students whose rank in class make up the top ten percent of the graduating class and qualify for automatic admission under Education Code 51.803 shall be recognized. Eligibility standards required for the local procedure for determining valedictorian and salutatorian shall not apply to the procedure for determining top ten percent. Breaking Ties for Top Ten Percent In case of a tie for the top ten percent, the method for breaking a tie for valedictorian or salutation shall apply. Honors to be Earned The district recognizes the valedictorian, salutatorian, top ten percent, National Honor Society students, Texas scholars and candidates for the Distinguished Achievement Graduation Program.
  23. 23. 23 REQUIRED STATE ASSESSMENTS FOR GRADUATION STUDENTS FIRST ENTERING 9TH GRADE DURING 2010-2011 OR EARLIER TAKS (Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills) Exit-Level Exam Requirement for Graduation: Texas state law has mandated that all non-exempt students must pass the exit-level test in order to receive a diploma. The exit-level TAKS contains tests of English Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, and Social Studies and is administered each spring to all students in Grade 11. If a student does not pass any subject area(s) of the test, that portion of the test may be retaken each time the TAKS is administered on designated days during the fall, spring, and summer. After a student passes all sections of the test and meets all other graduation requirements, a diploma will be awarded STUDENTS FIRST ENTERING 9TH GRADE DURING 2011-2012 OR LATER STAAR (State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness) End-of-Course (EOC) Requirements for Graduation: In 2007 Senate Bill 1031 was enacted, which called for development of end-of-course assessment instruments. These EOC assessments became part of the graduation requirements beginning with the freshman class of 2011-2012. The tests a student is required to take and the required scores are determined by the State. Each EOC exam will have a designated satisfactory performance score. If the student does not meet the score requirement, the student will be required to retake the test. Students not passing the EOC may retest during scheduled testing administrations. GENERAL INFORMATION I. Grade Level Classifications For the purpose of classifying students: Freshman: A student promoted/assigned to the 9th grade. Sophomore: A student must have completed 6 credits. Junior: A student must have completed 12 credits. Senior: A student must have completed 18 credits. This classification is based on the number of credits actually completed by the beginning of the school year. Credits earned through summer school, credit-by-exam, or correspondence should be on file in the registrar’s office by the first day of school for classification purposes. A correspondence course is not considered completed until the final grade is recorded in the registrar’s office. Please consult the campus principal for further clarification regarding extracurricular eligibility requirements. Students are not reclassified during the school year except for:  Students who have fallen behind their graduation cohort and who have earned the minimum number of credits required for a higher classification will be reclassified at the end of the first semester.  Students who plan to graduate at the end of their junior year who have submitted an early graduation plan to their counselor will be reclassified as seniors at the end of the first semester if minimum credit requirements have been met. II. Schedule Changes Requests for schedule changes for the upcoming school year can be made from pre-registration through last day of the current school year. Schedule change requests over summer break may be made by phone or email to the student’s counselor/academic advisor or in person during the formal schedule change request period in August prior to the beginning of school. Dates and times for formal schedule changes in August will be posted on the GISD website under the heading Registration Schedule Information. Requests for schedule changes will be considered up to the first ten school days of each semester. Schedule changes requested after the first ten school days of the school semester may constitute a loss in credit for the semester per the 90% attendance laws. Any schedule change requests made after the first ten days of the semester due to an extenuating circumstance must be approved by the
  24. 24. 24 student’s grade level principal before any changes can be made. After the first 10 days of school, students who choose to transfer from a Pre-AP or AP course to a regular course can submit a request after the 4th week of the semester. All changes will be completed by the end of the 1st grading period. After this deadline, no schedule changes will be made until the end of the semester. When a student transfers from a Pre-AP, and/or AP course to a core academic course or from a core academic course to an advanced course, the grades earned in the original class will be transferred as earned without alteration. Student schedules will not be changed to select different teachers, lunch periods, or a previously selected elective, or for other preferential reasons. Schedule corrections will be considered only if a student fails to satisfy prerequisites, the school has made an error, a scheduling conflict exists, a student successfully completes summer school, credit-by-exam or correspondence courses, or due to other extenuating circumstances. Since parents are involved in the initial selection of courses, requests for changes in schedules should be signed by the parents. All schedule changes must be approved by the principal or designee. III. Semester System The school year is divided into two semesters with two nine-week reporting periods in each semester. The semester grade average is determined by the two nine-week averages and the semester final exam. For courses that are two semesters in duration, the two semester grades will be averaged to determine total credit for the course. A passing grade for one semester may bring up a failing grade in the other semester if the yearly average is 70 or higher. Students earn .5 credit per period per semester for coursework toward graduation requirements if they: 1) have earned a 70 or higher average and 2) have been in attendance at least 90% of the days the class is offered. The student handbook outlines alternative ways for students to make up work or regain credit lost because of absences. IV. Suspension from Extracurricular Activities A student shall be suspended from participation in any extracurricular activities sponsored or sanctioned by the district or the UIL after a grade eligibility period in which the student received a failing grade (lower than 70) in any class. A student who received a grade lower than 70 in a class identified as advanced by board policy may be eligible to participate in an extracurricular activity. See GISD board policy for eligibility requirements. COLLEGE INFORMATION Automatic Admissions Top Ten Percent HB 3826 requires that students in the top ten percent of their high school graduating class are eligible for automatic admission to public institutions of higher education in Texas only if they have completed the Recommended or Distinguished Achievement Program and complete the college application requirements. (University of Texas at Austin may have a percentage for automatic admission that will change from year to year.) Occasionally, changes occur in course requirements due to action by the Texas Legislature and/or the Texas State Board of Education. The counselors will communicate to students any changes in requirements that could impact graduation requirements. Otherwise, students will graduate with the course requirements in place when entering the ninth grade. College Entrance Exams PSAT, SAT, and ACT In addition to taking rigorous courses in high school, students should prepare themselves for college entrance exams. College entrance exams include the College Board’s SAT and the ACT. The SAT assesses verbal and mathematical reasoning skills students have developed over time and skills they need to be successful in college. Preparation for the SAT begins with the PSAT, or Preliminary SAT. By taking the PSAT in both 10th and 11th grades, students have two opportunities to practice for the SAT. Students may receive information from potential colleges through the Student Search Service. They may also recognize potential in AP courses through analysis of their PSAT scores. In addition, the PSAT score on the test taken during the junior year is used for qualification for the National Merit Scholarship Competition. Both the PSAT and the SAT measure verbal reasoning skills, critical reading skills and math problem-solving skills. Students receive feedback on their PSAT results that can help them identify strengths and weaknesses in preparing for the SAT. Information about the PSAT and the SAT can be found at www.collegeboard.com. Another college entrance exam, the ACT, assesses high school students’ general educational development and their ability to complete college-level work. The multiple-choice tests cover four skill areas: English, mathematics, reading, and science. Writing is not a component of the general ACT exam. There is an optional writing test that measures skill in planning and writing a short essay. More information about ACT can be found at www.act.org. GISD provides students with the opportunity to take the PSAT each October. SAT and ACT are offered on various dates and locations throughout the year. GHS and EVHS are not ACT or SAT test sites. For more information on PSAT, SAT and ACT contact the school counselor.
  25. 25. 25 College Connection College Connection is a partnership between Austin Community College and GISD that promotes college access and success. College Connection increases the number of GISD graduates entering college by taking seniors through the college application and enrollment process at ACC. The college application process can be intimidating for students. The goal is to remove the “mystery” of how college entrance works. Students will be given the opportunity to participate in events that include assistance with the ACC admission application, financial aid, ASSET/COMPASS placement testing, tours of ACC campuses, orientation and advising. Graduating seniors will receive a lifetime letter of acceptance to ACC as part of their graduation portfolio packet. Students who complete the College Connection program are not required to attend ACC, but will graduate from GHS, EVHS or Richarte High School with acceptance to ACC. CLEP Exams College Board CLEP Exams offered at individual college campuses and/or SAT II subject exams offered to students while they are still in high school provide students an opportunity to demonstrate college-level knowledge and earn college credit or advanced placement by examination. Students demonstrate knowledge by taking College Board CLEP exams (academic courses) or college or university departmental exams (academic and technical courses). Check with the college of your choice for specific information.
  26. 26. 26 GRADUATION GRADE LEVEL PLANNING GRADE LEVEL INFORMATION FRESHMAN: Students in the ninth grade will take English I, Algebra I or Geometry (for those students who earned Algebra I credit in middle school), Biology, and World Geography. Other courses include: Health, PE, a fine arts course, a foreign language course or a Career & Technical Education course. SOPHOMORE: Tenth grade requirements include English II, World History, Geometry or Algebra II, and Biology or Chemistry. Other requirements that need to be taken over the next two years include PE, a fine arts course, and a foreign language course if these are not yet completed. Select electives with the goal of completing a Program of Study. Make note of the prerequisites of courses that you may want to take as an eleventh grader to ensure that these are being met. JUNIOR: Eleventh grade students should carefully check required courses for the Recommended High School Graduation Program and make sure the proper courses have been selected. Courses include English III, U. S. History, and the third math and Chemistry or Physics. Numerous Advanced Placement and Dual Credit courses are available. All selections should be made with an ultimate career goal or college major in mind. State Testing Requirements: Students must meet state standards on all EOC-tested subjects. Other Testing: PSAT in October; SAT/ACT in the Spring (recommended); AP Exams if coursework has been completed SENIOR: It is critical that each student, and his or her parent, review very carefully the requirements for graduation to ensure the proper classes are selected to meet graduation requirements (see page 8 of course catalog). Courses include English IV, Government, Economics, and the fourth math and science if not previously completed. The counselor will work diligently with you to select the proper classes, but remember that your graduation is ultimately your responsibility. Opportunities to retake classes previously failed will inhibit your options to take elective courses. By your senior year, you should have plans for after graduation, so be sure your course selections adequately prepare you for your future plans. College: Choose 3-5 schools: one dream school that may seem like a stretch, one sure thing, and several choices in between. Make sure you meet the admissions requirements and are registered for the proper entrance exams. Apply early. Do not wait until just before the deadline or you may be too late. Technical School: Check with several different schools to make sure they have the kind of training you are looking for. Compare their job placement rates and financial aid opportunities to determine which school is your best choice. Military: Talk to recruiters from several branches of the services. See which one offers you the best opportunities. Make an appointment to take the ASVAB, and keep in touch with the recruiter of the branch you select. Work: Make sure you have adequate job skills for a career with a future, not just a temporary job. See if the benefits plan offers incentives for further education within the field. Testing: Exit-Level TAKS - All or any parts if not yet passed at 11th grade; SAT/ACT in the fall (recommended); AP Exams if coursework has been completed; ASSET/COMPASS Exam through ACC College Connection (if desired or needed) Remember… All graduation requirements, including passing all parts of TAKS or meeting minimum and cumulative score requirements on EOC, must be met before you can receive your diploma. If you have earned all required graduation credits, but not passed all sections of TAKS or met cumulative score requirements on EOC, you may receive a certificate of credit completion, but will not receive your high school diploma. 9th 11th 10th 12th
  27. 27. 27 GEORGETOWN ISD 4-YEAR GRADUATION PLANNING DOCUMENT Name: Date: Career Programs of Study: ___________________ 9th Grade 10th Grade Summer 11th Grade Summer 12th Grade ENGLISH I ENGLISH II ENGLISH III ENGLISH IV MATH MATH MATH MATH SCIENCE SCIENCE SCIENCE SCIENCE WORLD GEOGRAPHY WORLD HISTORY U.S. HISTORY GOVERNMENT/ ECONOMICS See current plan on Career Cruising: www.careercruising.com Contact the campus counselor/academic advisor for additional assistance. Contact Richarte High School for RHS Intake Requirements.
  28. 28. 28 HIGH SCHOOL COURSE DESCRIPTIONS CAPSTONE RESEARCH IN ENGLISH, SCIENCE, OR SOCIAL STUDIES (Weighted) Credit: See below Grade Placement: 9-12 Prerequisite(s): Identified Gifted and Talented  INDEPENDENT STUDY IN ENGLISH (.5-1 Credit)  INDEPENDENT STUDY IN SPEECH (.5-1 Credit)  INDEPENDENT STUDY IN JOURNALISM (.5-1 Credit)  INDEPENDENT STUDY OF SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH AND DESIGN (1-3 Credits)  SOCIAL STUDIES RESEARCH METHODS (.5-2 Credits)  SOCIAL STUDIES ADVANCED STUDIES (.5-2 Credits)  ECONOMICS ADVANCED STUDIES (.5-1 Credit) These independent study courses are designed for gifted and talented students in grades 9-12 and will greatly enhance the opportunities for the production of advanced academic products through guided, multidisciplinary research. These courses are based on the TEA performance standards for gifted and talented students that were enacted by Rider 69 in 1999 in the Texas legislature. A project that consists of the long-term development of a question or idea that is significant to professionals in the academic area of interest will be the focal point of these courses. Sophisticated research methods and technology appropriate to the field of study will be used. The project must demonstrate creative mastery of content through a final product of professional quality. The final product, which is scored by judges, may be a written product, public performance and/or presentation. Students who successfully complete a project will earn independent study credit in the chosen discipline. Each course may be repeated with different course content for up to the maximum number of credits specified above. INDEPENDENT STUDY IN MATHEMATICS (Weighted) Credit: .5-3 Grade Placement: 11-12 Prerequisite(s): Identified Gifted/Talented, Algebra II, Geometry, and concurrent enrollment or credit in Pre-Calculus This course is rigorous, fast-paced and designed to challenge the mathematically gifted student. This course will extend mathematical understanding beyond the Algebra II level in a specific area or areas of mathematics, such as theory of equations, number theory, non- Euclidian geometry, discrete mathematics, advanced survey of mathematics, or history of mathematics. This course will provide students opportunities to pursue interest in mathematical topics via independent research, directed learning, preparation for and participation in challenging mathematics competitions, and/or mentoring by a mathematics professional. Students may repeat this course with different course content for up to 3 credits. INDEPENDENT STUDY IN TECHNOLOGY APPLICATIONS Credit: 1 Grade Placement: 11-12 Prerequisite(s): Minimum of 2 high school information technology courses Students gain advanced knowledge and skills in the application, design, production, implementation, maintenance, evaluation, and assessment of products, services, and systems. Knowledge and skills in the proper use of analytical skills and application of information technology concepts and standards are essential to prepare students for success in a technology-driven society. Critical thinking, information technology experience, and product development may be conducted in a classroom setting with an industry mentor, as an unpaid internship, or as career preparation. INDEPENDENT STUDIES

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