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Seven habits

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Seven habits

  1. 1. + Seven Habits of Highly Effective Project Managers Stephen Covey’s Seven Habits of Highly Effective People is a good starting point for project management 7 Habits of Highly Effective Project Managers By Sarah Hansen February 21, 2014, www.teamgantt.com/blog/ 1
  2. 2. + Seven Habits 1. Be proactive 2. Begin with the end in mind 3. Put first things first 4. Think Win-Win 5. Seek first to understand,, Then to be Understood 6. Synergize 7. Sharpen the Saw 2
  3. 3. + Be a Proactive Manager 3
  4. 4. + Three Types of Project Managers 1. The “accidental” project manager - come up through the ranks and been picked to lead a project due to their vast technical experience, but not their people management expertise. 2. The “good” project manager is someone who handles both the knowledge and management portions of the business well, but they tend to be more reactive than proactive in their approach.  They do what is expected, but no more.  Follow the rules, but don’t create new innovative venues to do things better. 3. A “proactive” project manager has plans in place to deal with issues before they occur, instead of reacting to them.  They are one step ahead of the client’s needs.  Set up ways to communicate with everyone involved and hold each member accountable for their part of the total picture.  Do all that they can to ensure no time is lost in miscommunications, lack of understanding of expectations, or putting productive energies into the wrong venues. 4
  5. 5. + Begin with the End in Mind 5
  6. 6. + Begin with the End In Mind  In project management, it is easy to go into analysis paralysis.  When multiple people take a project, and break it down into pieces of their own real estate, it can be difficult to stay focused on the final outcomes.  Everyone’s work must come together in the end.  Egos must be set aside for the greater congruency of the overall picture.  It is much easier to work together when everyone is focused on the final team outcome, not on stealing the spotlight and looking like a rock star.  We’ll apply our Deliverables Based Planning paradigm to define what DONE looks like What does done look like in units of measure meaningful to the decision 6
  7. 7. + To Successfully Complete All Our Deliverables We Need a Plan  The Plan describes where we are going, the possible paths we can take to reach our destination, and the progress and performance assessment points along the way to assure we are on the right path.  These assessment points measures the physical percent complete of our product or service against the planned technical percent complete.  This is the only real measure of progress to plan.  Not the passage of time or consumption of money. 7
  8. 8. + Planning for DONE is a Full Contact Sport 8
  9. 9. + To Know if we’re on the Right Path, we Need Measures of Progress to Plan  We must measure increasing product maturity in units meaningful to the decision makers.  We must see the risks before they arrive so we can take corrective action. 9
  10. 10. + 6 Steps To Build A Deliverables Based Plan 10 Activities in the Project Planning Process 1 Identify key deliverables needed to fulfill the project’s requirements 2 Identify milestones for completion of each deliverable 3 Identify quantifiable measures of success for all work 4 Identify work needed to complete the deliverables 5 Sequence the work in a logical order to meet planned milestones 6 Adjust work sequence to mitigate major risks
  11. 11. + Put First Things First 11
  12. 12. + Put First Things First  Do your big rocks  Your most impactful, important things – first.  Don’t allow little distractions and rabbit trails to take away your focus from the main areas in your project.  If we have very important items to complete during the day,  Reduce distractions until we’ve completed our most important tasks.  we can get to other less urgent items later, after we’ve finished our biggest daily goals. 12
  13. 13. + Think Win Win 13
  14. 14. + Thinking Win Win, Starts with the Definition of TEAM  Working together on a project is the way to improve our team- building skills.  This may mean compromising certain strategies for the greater good of all.  If one member wins, and everyone else doesn’t, there is no team  It is challenging to find win / win scenarios.  It takes more creativity, more consideration, and more communication than some people can invest.  4 elements of a functional team  Common Commitment And Purpose  Performance Goals  Complementary Skills  Mutual Accountability A Team is a small number of people with complementary skills committed to a common purpose, set of performance goals, and approach for which they hold themselves mutually accountable. – Jon Katzenbach 14
  15. 15. + Seek First To Understand, Then to be Understand 15
  16. 16. + Synergize 16
  17. 17. + Sharpen the Saw 17

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