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Heliotropic Abundance

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Heliotropic Abundance

  1. 1. Heliotropic Abundance The key to project success is connecting Leadership Behaviors with Project Management Principles, Processes, and Practice The use of Heliotropic Abundance moves the Project Management role to the Project Leadership Role
  2. 2. In Our Short 50‒Minute Crash Workshop We’ll Focus on … ¨ How project Leadership behaviors in four quadrants of Heliotropic Abundance enable project success ¨ Learning how organizational practices and leadership style can explain how success was exhibited in a case study Understanding that Principles, Practices, and Processes of Project Management are Necessary but Not Sufficient for Success which Must Be Leadership Based 2
  3. 3. Project Leaders Apply Abundance Principles … ¨ To identify and build sources of strength, resilience, and vitality rather than simply solving problems and overcoming difficulties. ¨ Apply 21 principles of Heliotropic Abundance leadership practices and key techniques can be applied in any project, in any domain using any project development method. ¨ Can be much more effective in applying Principles the Principles, Practices, and Process of Project Management 3
  4. 4. Making the Impossible Possible, Kim Cameron and Marc Lavine, 2006 Lessons learned from the cleanup of America’s most dangerous Nuclear Weapons Plan, described in
  5. 5. First, Some Timeless Project Management Advice From The Past 5 The way to success is … First, have a definite, clear practical ideal; a goal, an objective. Second, have the necessary means to achieve those ends; wisdom, money, materials, and methods. Third, adjust all your means to that end. ‒ Aristotle
  6. 6. 1. What Does DONE Look Like? 2. How Do We Get to DONE? 3. Is There Enough Time, Resources, And Money To Get to DONE? 4. What Impediments Will Be Encountered Along The Way to DONE? 5. What Are The Units Of Measures For Progress To Plan for each Deliverable? All Successful Projects Provide Credible Answers To These 5 Questions … 6 Performance-Based Project Management®, Copyright © Glen B. Alleman, 2012, 2013
  7. 7. I ‒ What Does Done Look Like? § Develop a list of features or deliverables and describe the technical capabilities for each in units of measure meaningful to the decision makers. § Model the interdependencies between these deliverables. § Develop the Measures of Effectiveness and Measures of Performance and Key Performance Parameters for each Capability 7
  8. 8. “Done” Provides a Capability to Do Something 8
  9. 9. II ‒ How Do We Get To Done When Needed for the Planned Cost? Build a Plan and a Schedule for the work to be performed. Define “packages of work” for all the activities with deliverables defined as “exit criteria” Link the Accomplishment and Criteria vertically First and then link the Work Packages horizontally 9
  10. 10. III ‒ Do We Have the Resources To Reach Done? List the needed staff and materials for the project. Assign these staff and materials to the work packages Estimate the cost of the staff and materials and the impact of this variance on the total project cost and delivery schedule 10
  11. 11. IV ‒ What Are The Impediments to Reaching Done? Make a list of risks and rank them by priority. Assess impact on cost and schedule for each risk and the dependencies of these risks on external and internal drivers Assess the probability of occurrence and the probabilistic impact on cost and schedule impact, cost of handling, and cost of the residual risk after handling 11
  12. 12. All Risk Comes From Uncertainty If you take away only ONE idea from this session, this should be it Risk management is project management for Adults ‒ Tim Lister 12
  13. 13. V ‒ How Do We Measure Our Progress Toward Done? § Describe the outcomes of the work effort using language the customer understands § Assign Technical Performance Measures to the Deliverables § Assign Measures of Performance, Measures of Effectiveness, Key Performance Parameters, and Integrate these throughout the project 13
  14. 14. 14 Apply Continuous Risk Management to each Performance Based Management process area Identify Needed Capabilities needed to achieve the project objectives or the end state for a specific scenario. Elicit Technical & Operational Requirements needed for the system capabilities to be fulfilled. Establish Performance Measurement Baseline time– phased network of work activities describing the work to be performed Execute Performance Measurement Baseline activities while assuring technical performance is met I II III IV V
  15. 15. I ‒ Identify Needed Capabilities “Planning, under uncertainty, to provide capabilities suitable for a wide range of modern-day challenges and circumstances while working within an economic framework that necessitates choice.” By Identifying the needed capabilities, the technical and operational requirements can be traced from the Measures of Effectiveness (MOE) to each deliverable in the Integrated Master Plan and Schedule. Capabilities state the “why” of the system. 15 † Analytic Architecture for Capabilities-Based Planning, Mission-System Analysis, and Transformation, Paul Davis, RAND, 2002
  16. 16. Identify Needed System Capabilities 16 What Should We Do? Where Are We Now? Abstracted from: “Capabilities‒Based Planning – How It Is Intended To Work And Challenges To Its Successful Implementation,” Col. Stephen K. Walker, United States Army, U. S. Army War College, March 2005
  17. 17. II ‒ Establish the Technical and Operational Requirements to Deliver the Needed Capabilities Technical and Operational requirements are the basis of Work Packages and Planning Packages and the work efforts needed to produce the deliverables from these Packages. These deliverables fulfill the technical and operational requirements needed to deliver the system Capabilities. Tracing Capabilities to Requirements and back again, assures each requirement has a “home” in the system. 17
  18. 18. Identify Requirements That Delivery Capabilities 18
  19. 19. III ‒ Establish the Performance Measurement Baseline The Performance Measurement Baseline (PMB) is the integration of scope, schedule, cost used to assess progress to plan with measures of physical percent complete for the Effectiveness and Performance of the delivered Capabilities. Starting at the Work Package level, a pre–defined performance measure is established. During the performance period assessment of “progress to plan” produce measures of Physical Percent Complete. 19
  20. 20. Three Elements of the Performance Measurement Baseline 20 Cost Baseline Schedule Baseline Technical Baseline Determine Scope and Approach Develop Technical Logic Develop Technical Baseline Develop WBS Define Activities Estimate Time Durations Sequence Activities Finalize Schedule Identify Apportioned Milestones Determine Resource Requirement Prepare Cost Estimate Resource Load Schedule Finalize Apportioned Milestones Determine Funding Constraints Approve PMB Perform Functional Analysis
  21. 21. IV ‒ Execute the Performance Measurement Baseline Using the Performance Measurement Baseline (PMB), each Work Package must start as planned, complete on or near the planned date, and produce the planned technical performance. This is the key to success for any credible Performance Based Management plan. In the absence of this, the project is behind schedule, over budget, and non–compliant with the technical goals. 21
  22. 22. Physical Percent Complete is the Only Measure of Progress to Plan ¨ Physical Percent Complete means tangible evidence of progress to plan. ¨ This evidence is defined before the work starts in units of measure meaningful to the decision makers. ¨ Number of working products delivered as planned ¨ Technical Performance Measures met as planned ¨ Compliance with any specification, within error bands 22
  23. 23. V ‒ Perform Continuous Risk Management CRM describes the underlying principles, concepts, and functions of risk management and provides guidance on how to implement it as a continuous practice in projects and organizations. 23
  24. 24. Perform Continuous Risk Management 24
  25. 25. 5 Immutable Principles 5 Practices of Performance-Based Project Management® I Identify Needed Capabilities II Establish Requirements Baseline III Performance Measurement Baseline (PMB) IV Execute the PMB V Continuous Risk Management Where are we going? ConOps, SOO, SOW Technical and Operational Based Plan Incremental Maturity Measures Physical Percent Complete Risk Identification How are we going to get there? Integrated Master Plan (IMP) Work Breakdown Structure Integrated Master Schedule (IMS) Iterative and Incremental Delivery Risk Analysis What do we need along the way? Resource Management Plan Future Performance Forecasting Risk Handling Plans What impediments will we encounter along the way? 4 Levels of Uncertainty: 1) Variance 2) Foreseen 3) Unforeseen 4) Chaos Technical and programmatic Risk handling assigned to all WBS deliverables Risk adjustments to cost and schedule measures Risk adjusted Performance Measurement Baseline Risk Tracking and Reporting How do we measure progress? Measures of Effectiveness (MoE) Measures of Performance (MoP) Technical Performance Measures (TPM) Earned Value Management (EVM) Risk Control 25
  26. 26. With the Principles, Processes, and Practices of Traditional Project Management Established … … Let’s Applying Heliotropic Abundance to Increase the Probability of Project Success 26
  27. 27. 27
  28. 28. Abundance Principle of Successful Project Management ¨ Strive for positive deviance, pursuing the best of the human condition and working to fulfill the highest potential of the organization. ¨ Focuses on: ¤ Resilience ¤ Flourishing ¤ Vitality ¤ Extraordinarily positive individual and organizational outcomes 28 28
  29. 29. The Ordinary Approach to Project Management † ¨ Identify and define the problem accurately. ¨ Generate alternate solutions to the problem based on root causes so that convergence on a solution is not premature. ¨ Focus on evaluating and selecting the best alternative. ¨ Implement the chosen alternative solution and follow up to ensure that the problem or obstacle is resolved. 29 † Leading Change, John Kotter Harvard Business School Press, 1996, Organization Change: Theory and Practice, W. W. Burke, Sage, 2002, A Primer on Decision Making: How Decisions Happen, J. G. March, Free Press, 1994 Smart Thinking for Crazy Times: The Art of Solving the Right Problems, I. I. Mitroff, Berrett–Koehler, 1998 29
  30. 30. The Abundance Approach to Project Management ¨ Abundance is not a substitute for ordinary management – it is a supplement for the problem- solving approach. ¨ Abundance focuses on: ¤ Closing the gaps between acceptable performance and spectacular performance. ¤ Emphasizes positively deviant accomplishments rather than normal or expected accomplishments. ¤ Positive possibilities rather than deficits. 30 30
  31. 31. Conventional Principles versus Abundance Principles 31 Conventional Principles Abundance Principles General Leadership Principles 1 Problem solving and deficit gaps Virtuousness and abundance gaps 2 A single heroic leader Multiple leaders playing multiple roles 3 One leader from the beginning to end A continuity of leaders 4 Congruence and consistency Paradox and contradiction Principles Related to Visionary and Symbolic Leadership 5 Logical, rational, and sensible visions – with SMART goals Symbolic, emotional, and meaningful – with profound purpose 6 Consistency, stability, and predictability Revolution and positive deviance 7 Personal benefits and advantages Meaningfulness beyond personal benefits 8 Organizations absorb the risks of failure and benefits of success Employees share the risks of failure and rewards for success
  32. 32. Conventional Principles versus Abundance Principles 32 Conventional Principles Abundance Principles Careful, Clear, and Controlled Leadership 9 § Organizational change at the expense of the people § Organizational change for the benefit of the people 10 § Commitments and priorities based on environmental demands § Unalterable commitments and integrity at all costs 11 § Managing the contract, attaching resources to performance § Managing the contract and ensuring stable funding 12 § Ultimate responsibility and accountability for measurable success at the top § Responsibility and accountability for measurable success for everyone
  33. 33. Conventional Principles versus Abundance Principles 33 Conventional Principles Abundance Principles Collaboration, Engagement, and Participation 13 §Building on and reinforcing the current culture §Introducing challenges that the culture cannot address 14 §Decision making and leadership starts at the top §Employee and management in partnerships in planning, decision making, training, evaluation, and discipline 15 §Need–to–know information sharing and physical separation §Early, frequent, and abundant information sharing with colocation 16 §Long–term employment, personal relations, and use of specialist §Long–employability, professional relations, and retraining
  34. 34. Conventional Principles versus Abundance Principles 34 Conventional Principles Abundance Principles Rigorous, uncompromising, and results oriented leadership 17 §Managing external communications §Openness of messaging through early and often communications 18 §Keeping critics at a distance §Making critics of stakeholders, building relationships, and using positive strategies 19 §Clear, stable performance targets that meet standard coming from the top §Escalating performance, virtuousness, and positive deviance targets from multiple sources 20 §Organizational financial benefit from outstanding success §Financial generosity and benevolence with employees
  35. 35. Four Quadrants of Performance Improvement Guided by the Abundance Approach Collaborate Create Control Compete 35
  36. 36. 36 Long Term Individuality / Flexibility New Internal Maintenance Culture Type: CLAN Culture Type: ADHOCRACY External Positioning Orientation: COLLOABORATE Orientation: CREATE Leader Type: § Facilitator § Mentor § Team builder Leader Type: § Innovator § Entrepreneur § Visionary Value Drivers: § Commitment § Communication § Development Value Drivers: § Innovative outputs § Transformational § Agility Theory of Effectiveness: § Human development and high commitment produce effectiveness Theory of Effectiveness: § Innovativeness, vision, and constant change produce effectiveness Culture Type: HEIRARCHY Culture Type: MARKET Orientation: CONTROL Orientation: COMPETE Leader Type: § Coordinator § Monitor § Organizer Leader Type: § Hard driver § Competitor § Producer Value Drivers: § Efficiency § Timeliness § Consistency and Uniformity Value Drivers: § Market share § Goal achievement § Profitability Theory of Effectiveness: § Control and efficiency with capable processes produce effectiveness Theory of Effectiveness: § Aggressively competing and customer focus produce effectiveness Incremental Stability / Control Fast
  37. 37. Leadership Principles for Project Success ¨ There are 21 Leadership Principles for the management of projects using the Heliotropic Abundance paradigm, grouped in five topics ¤ General Leadership principles ¤ Visionary and Symbolic principles ¤ Careful, Clear, and Control principles ¤ Collaborative, Engaging, and Participative principles 40
  38. 38. General Leadership Principles Conventional Project Management Principles 1. Problem-solving and decit gaps 2. A single heroic leader 3. One leader from beginning to end 4. Congruence and consistency Heliotropic Abundance Project Management Principles 1. Virtuousness and abundance gaps 2. Multiple leaders playing multiple roles 3. A continuity of leaders 4. Paradox and contradiction 41
  39. 39. Visionary and Symbolic Leadership Principles Conventional Project Management Principles 5. Left-brain visions—logical, rational, and sensible—with SMART goals 6. Consistency, stability, and predictability 7. Personal benets and advantages 8. Organizations absorb the risks of failure and benets of success Heliotropic Abundance Project Management Principles 5. Right-brain visions—symbolic, emotional, and meaningful— with profound purpose 6. Revolution and positive deviance 7. Meaningfulness beyond personal benets 8. Employees share the risks of failure and rewards from success 42
  40. 40. Careful, Clear, and Controlled Leadership Principles Conventional Project Management Principles 9. Downsizing at the expense of people 10. Commitments and priorities based on environmental demands 11. Managing the contractor, attaching resources to performance 12. Ultimate responsibility and accountability for measurable success at the top 13. Adaptability and addressing work challenges as they arise Heliotropic Abundance Project Management Principles 9. Downsizing for the benet of people 10. Unalterable commitments and integrity at all costs 11. Managing the contract and ensuring stable funding 12. Responsibility and accountability for measurable success for everyone, including workers, managers, regulators, community organizations, and funders 13. Engaging only in value-added activities 43
  41. 41. Collaborative, Engaging, and Participative Leadership Principles Conventional Project Management Principles 14. Building on and reinforcing the current culture 15. Decision-making and leadership at the top 16. Need-to-know information sharing and physical separation 17. Long-term employment, personal relations, and the use of specialists Heliotropic Abundance Project Management Principles 14. Introducing challenges that the culture cannot address 15. Employee and union partnerships in planning, decision-making, training, evaluation, and discipline 16. Early, frequent, and abundant information-sharing with colocation 17. Long-term employability, professional relations, and retraining 44
  42. 42. Rigorous, Uncompromising, and Results‒Oriented Leadership Principles Conventional Project Management Principles 18. Managing the media 19. Keeping adversaries at a distance and using protective political strategies 20. Clear, stable performance targets that meet standards coming from the top 21. Organizational nancial benet from outstanding success Heliotropic Abundance Project Management Principles 18. Openness with the media early and often 19. Making adversaries stakeholders, building relationships, and using positive political strategies 20. Escalating performance, virtuousness, and positive deviance targets from multiple sources 21. Financial generosity and benevolence with employees 45
  43. 43. This is What DONE Looks Like 46
  44. 44. 47

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