Successfully reported this slideshow.
Your SlideShare is downloading. ×

Breaking the Project Failure Cycle

Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Loading in …3
×

Check these out next

1 of 32 Ad

Breaking the Project Failure Cycle

Download to read offline

Enterprise projects are not just larger small projects. They are completely different beasts - "radical Project Management," Rob Thomsett

Enterprise projects are not just larger small projects. They are completely different beasts - "radical Project Management," Rob Thomsett

Advertisement
Advertisement

More Related Content

Slideshows for you (20)

Similar to Breaking the Project Failure Cycle (20)

Advertisement

More from Glen Alleman (20)

Recently uploaded (20)

Advertisement

Breaking the Project Failure Cycle

  1. 1. Breaking the Project Failure Cycle “Enterprise projects are not just larger small projects. They are completely different beasts” – Radical Project Management, Rob Thomsett 1
  2. 2. Today's Speakers 2 Glen Alleman is Practice Director Strategy and Performance management with Lewis & Fowler. His more than 25 Years of IT Leadership and Consulting comes from positions in defense and aerospace, petrochemicals, newspaper publishing systems, manufacturing, electric utilities, pulp and paper, government services, and semiconductors. Glen holds advanced degrees in Physics and Systems Management. Scott Daley is the lead consultant for Microsoft’s Enterprise Project Management team in the Western US. Over the past 7 years, Scott has delivered MS Project Server and related products to many organizations. He focuses on the challenges organizations face as they try to improve their portfolio, resource, and project management.
  3. 3. Projects and Their Plans  The integrity of any project is its Plan  The Plan defines the anatomy and physiology of the project  The Plan is tool for communicating between the project team participants  The Plan is the Strategy for the project  The Plan evolves as decisions and strategies evolve Building project success around a credible plan is a good start. Executing that plan comes next. But the plan can not guide the execution if it is not credible. It’s the combination of a credible plan and a competent execution team that gives a fighting chance of being successful 3 Physiology – the mechanical, physical functions of the studied object Anatomy – the consideration of the structure of the studied object
  4. 4. Root Causes of Project Failure  Unrealistic deadlines  Communication deficits  Uncontrolled scope changes  Unmitigated resource competition  Uncertain dependencies  Failure to manage risk  Insufficient delivery skills  Lack of accountability for the outcomes  Disengaged customers or stakeholders  Lack of business vision and goals There is a nearly endless list of causes for project failure. Here are some that we can actually do something about. 4
  5. 5. Can Project Management Methods and Tools save a project failure ?  Probably not…  Methods and Tools alone don’t help. If they did we wouldn’t be here today  What does help?  Failure is not really a project management problem  It’s a business management problem  The solution to business problem starts with asking:  How can we measure and control value for our investment? Methods and Tools by themselves provide little help for a troubled project. Executing the method, with competent staff and a credible plan is a start. But there is more needed than this. A set of principles must be the basis of any successful project delivery method. 5
  6. 6. The processes needed for a successful project Identify Needed Business Capabilities Establish a Performance Measurement Baseline Execute the Performance Measurement Baseline Capabilities Based Plan Business Value Stream Technical Performance Measures Earned Value Performance Technical Performance Measures Business Value Stream Technical Requirements Establish a Requirements Baseline 4 core processes need to be in place to break the project failure cycle. All are important. All are mandatory. All must execute with the highest quality level. None guarantee success. There is no such thing. 6
  7. 7. The four processes work together to break the Project Failure cycle Process Outcomes supporting project success Identify the Business Needs  A clear and concise description of the needed business capabilities  A description of the value stream these business capabilities provide. This value stream is the connection between to the Business , the Technical Requirements and the project’s Performance Measurement Baseline Establish a Requirements Baseline  A Work Breakdown structure derived from the requirements  Identification of the Work Packages that produce the deliverables the create the business value Establish a Performance Measurement Baseline  Balance the Budgeted Cost for each work package to match available resources  Balance the Budgeted Cost for the entire project  Identify how Physical Percent Complete will be measured for each Work Package  Establish a single point of accountability for he success of each Work Package Execute the Performance Measurement Baseline  Capture the Actual Cost of Work Performed and Physical Percent Complete  Define the measure of progress by the delivered value for each Work Package  Make management decisions for the project using this delivered value 7
  8. 8. Core Questions that should be asked of any Project Manager daily  How much will this project cost?  When will it be done?  What are the risk we won’t reach the end within our budget?  What are we doing about these risks?  What do we get when we’re done?  Does the customer agree that these deliverables are meaningful? Deliverables Based Planning is the foundation of a successful project management process. The deliverables define what Done looks like, are the measure of progress and are meaningful to the customer. 8
  9. 9. Deliverables Based Planning can answers these questions But Execution is the key to Breaking the Failure Cycle Customers measure progress in terms of business value – the currency of this business value are the project deliverables, not the passage of time or consumption of money. 9
  10. 10. The 6 steps of Deliverables Based Planning 10 Decompose the Project Scope into a product based Work Breakdown Structure (WBS), then into Work Packages describing the production of all deliverables Decompose Scope Assign Responsibility to Work Packages (the groupings of deliverables) for the owners accountable for the management of resource allocation and cost baseline Assign Responsibility Arrange the Work Packages into a well formed network with defined deliverables, milestones, internal and external dependencies Arrange Work Packages Develop Time–Phased Budgeted Cost for Work Scheduled (BCWS) from labor and material costs in each Work Package and the Project as a whole Develop BCWS Assign Objective Performance Measures for each Work Package and summarize these for the Project as a whole Assign Performance Measures Establish a Performance Measurement Baseline used to forecast Work Package and Project ongoing and completion cost and schedule metrics Set Performance Baseline
  11. 11. Project Execution Processes Beneficial Outcomes to the Customer Starting with a Deliverables Based Plan Executing the Plan is next step along the path to success† Agreement on Interfaces Risk Management Formal Inspections Metrics Based Project Management Configuration and Data Management Project Wide Visibility People Aware Management Defect Tracking Binary Quality Gates Identify and Correct Defects Planning and Tracking Minimize Rework Effective Use of Personnel † These principles are not original. They are taken directly from the work of Norm Brown, the founder and executive Director of the Software Program Managers Network (SPMN). SPMN is a consortium of Department of Defense Program Managers dedicated to improving the practice of managing software acquisition and development projects in commercial and government domains. 11
  12. 12. Connecting the Execution Practices with Tools  The Execution Practices are the foundation of any good project management process  The challenge is how to implement them with the available tools  Microsoft tool suite – Project Server – Portfolio Manager – Share Point Server 12
  13. 13. Agreement on Interfaces Expose the needed agreements Execution Practice Tool Implementation Use Interface Control Documents (ICD) to define the nouns and verbs for each interface Share Point Services used as a repository for Interface Control Documents UML automates the definition of interface nouns and verbs SysML (XML) repository in Share Point Services searchable for dictionary of nouns and verbs These interfaces can take many forms – software, hardware, business processes, business units, customers, contractors. Documenting the “objects” exchanged across the interfaces creates the “semantics” of these objects. Their production and consumption provides the foundation for “Agreement on Interfaces” 13
  14. 14. Defect Tracking Identifies quality leakage Execution Practice Tool Implementation Keeping bug reports is necessary but not sufficient, the metrics of who, what, where, when, how, and why are also needed Issues tracking in Share Point Team Foundation Server Tracking metrics, basic indicators relating to defects, schedule, cost, requirements makes them visible Defect tracking portal using graphical dashboard of quality Defects appear in many forms – software bugs, construction flaws, product defects, processes disconnects, production failures. Each defect must be identified, classified, dealt with, and the source of the defect corrected as part of the execution of the project. Not doing this mortgages the future with the debt of a poor product 14
  15. 15. Binary Quality Gates 100% done before proceeding Execution Practice Tool Implementation When project planning and monitoring are based on insufficient detail, the discussion of the “true” status of the project is illusionary The right level of detail is driven by willingness to assume risk. How long are we willing to go before we discover we’re in trouble? Project management without detail is called “let’s pretend” Connecting physical percent complete with business value is the first step Incremental and iterative delivery of business value starts with a clear understanding of the meaning of “incremental value” to the business. Delivering small pieces that can be put to use, each with 100% quality and 100% capability (in their own right), provides the basis for continuous increasing maturity of the project. 15
  16. 16. Formal Risk Management Risks must be mitigated in the Plan Execution Practice Tool Implementation Risk management embedded in all the project management activities Risk activities “in line” with Work Package tasks, coded in WBS and assigned resources in Project Use programmatic risk management to make visible “hot spots” in the schedule Risk+ and @Risk for Project applied to a well former network of activities Risk management is how adults manage projects. But risks are not the same as issues. Managing both is needed for success. Identifying each risk and its mitigation takes place in the schedule, with assigned mitigation budget. 16
  17. 17. Formal Inspections Quality assurance made visible Execution Practice Tool Implementation The level of formality must match the level of quality Policies and procedures available “on line” through Share Point The term “inspection” can be replaced with many domain specific terms Defining the activities of “inspection” in the schedule, coding “Inspecting” the work products in some way defines the Exit Criteria for all project activities. This ranges from formal inspections to full simulation of the produced products to “quality build it.” 17
  18. 18. Project Performance Metrics How are we doing toward our Plan Execution Practice Tool Implementation The early identification of programmatic problems is the reason to have metrics Project performance metrics start with a credible programmatic baseline established in Project Server The project management metrics are the yardstick for measuring progress to plan Deliverables based planning, with associated Earned Value baseline held in Project Server Using Earned Value is now generally accepted for all project domains. Defining the baseline budget for the planned value, measuring the Physical Percent Complete and calculating the Earned Value from the Planned Value is the basis of Project Performance Metrics 18
  19. 19. Configuration Management How do all the parts come together Execution Practice Tool Implementation Separating Configuration Management from Development is the basis of higher quality project execution Plans and schedules define processes, artifacts and interfaces for the CM activities in the Master Schedule Information approved at the Binary Quality Gate level is a controlled document held in the configuration management system Document control implemented in Share Point Services Controlling the configuration of the project’s output starts with defining the proper configuration. Any uncontrolled change to this definition impacts technical performance, cost and schedule. 19
  20. 20. Project Wide Visibility Everyone knows where we are Execution Practice Tool Implementation The single most important factor in the success of any software project is the quality, experience, and motivation of the technical and support staff Dashboard, portals, repositories, seamless tools integration, work flow, electronic document management, programmatic performance all reduce work load, increase productivity and provide visibility into personal contribution Speaking to the customer in meaningful terms starts with understanding what it is the “is meaningful.” Making these meaningful measures visible is the basis of trust. “I can see you’re doing what you said you were going to do, at the time you send you were going to do it and for the cost we agreed on.” 20
  21. 21. People Aware Management Everyone’s on the same team Execution Practice Tool Implementation Focus on people as the foundation for the success of the project It’s the people stupid The single most important factor in the success of any software project is the quality, experience, and motivation of the technical and support staff High performance organizations start and end with people Providing tools that enable communication, shared understanding, trusted repositories, insight into performance, forecasting of future performance, management of risk and integration of work processes enables the people to work as a Team. 21
  22. 22. Putting all These Practices to Work Managing projects requires a definition of done, how to recognize done, the attributes of done and the units of measure of those attributes 22
  23. 23. A Sobering Statistic A Study of 400 enterprise class projects revealed that project performance does not tend to improve once the project has passed the 15% completion point. It often gets even worse! 23
  24. 24. Goal of any Project Management Process must be to …  Produce no surprises for the customer or the supplier  Build trust with free and frank discussions about – Risk, resources, planned effort, capabilities, commitment – Performance – financial, technical, personnel, maturity  Fully engage with customer’s strategies – Communication of needs to solution providers – Requirements traceable to business benefits  Understand risk management is how adults manage projects – Identify, analyze, plan, and mitigate – Risk informed management processes 24
  25. 25. Breaking the Project Failure Cycle  Define “done” in terms of measurable business value  These units of measure must be agreed to by the business  Measure progress to plan only in these units  Deliverables produced for invested cost  Do not use passage of time or consumption of resources as the primary metric. These are interesting to cost accounts, but not project managers If we’re going to avoid project failure, then we have to start out on the right foot. Describe what done looks like. Only perform work that produces “done.” 25
  26. 26. Process That Use These ToolsTools for successful project delivery What tools enable a well run project? Agreement on Interfaces Risk Management Formal Inspections Metrics Based PM Configuration Management Project Wide Visibility People Aware Management Defect Tracking Binary Quality Gates Identify and Correct Defects Planning and Tracking Minimize Rework Effective Use of Personnel Share Point Project Server Portfolio Manager 26
  27. 27. Project Failure Root Causes and Some Tools Based Approaches Project Failure Cycle Root Causes Tool Enabled Approaches Tool Unrealistic deadlines Identify the capacity for work using resource planning, past performance measurement and required deliverables to define credible deadlines Project Server Communication deficits Deploy all communication channels including dashboard, cost and schedule forecasts, defect tracking, business case measurements, data repositories and project portals Share Point Uncontrolled scope changes Use formal requirements management processes, with document change control and tracking, sign offs, web access Share Point Unmitigated resource competition Use resource planning services Project Server Uncertain dependencies Identify and confirm conflicts and dependencies across the portfolio of projects Project Server Failure to manage risk Identify, mitigate and manage risk with “risk buy down” activities embedded in all schedules Project Server Share Point Insufficient delivery skills Provide skills inventory in the resource planning process Project Server Lack of accountability for the outcomes Identify single accountabilities, provide reporting and visibility for all deliverables Disengaged customers or stakeholders Provide easy access to project documents, progress, change management and deliverables Share Point Lack of business vision and goals Identify business value, connections to strategy and the performance attributes of the project through web portal Share Point Balanced Scorecard Manager 27
  28. 28. Just a Reminder  Tools are necessary,  Process are necessary,  Putting tools and process together is necessary,  But more is needed:  Skill  Experience  Innovation  A bit of Luck Initiating Closing MonitoringandControlling Executing Planning Integration Scope Time Cost Quality Human Resources Communications Risk Procurement Process Groups KnowledgeAreas 28
  29. 29. Breaking the Project Failure Cycle  As a project management, when your project makes you feel like this, it’s time to reconsider your approach …  Define the deliverables  Measure progress by measuring the deliverables  Make measurement meaningful to the business 29
  30. 30. Lewis & Fowler and MSFT  Founded in 2002, Lewis & Fowler is a consulting firm delivering business solutions through strategy development, business process design, tool selection and deployment ,and the project management of these activities.  Our singular focus of achieving strategic results for our clients through operational excellence is based on performance management, methodologies, practices, and program management tools.  Our long–term success depends on understanding our clients business needs and available solutions.  In the end, we help our clients exceed their business objectives, through our experience, processes and talent. 30
  31. 31. 31
  32. 32. Breaking the Project Failure Cycle Lewis & Fowler 8310 South Valley Highway Suite 300 Englewood, Colorado 80112 www.lewisandfowler.com 32

×