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(m)Learning in the (Wide) Open: a presentation delivered as part of #ILMWS

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The presentation was delivered as part of the Interagency Mobile Learning Webinar Series (#IMLWS) on May 21, 2014. http://www.adlnet.gov/interagency-mobile-learning-webinar-series-2014//

The presentation was delivered as part of the Interagency Mobile Learning Webinar Series (#IMLWS) on May 21, 2014. http://www.adlnet.gov/interagency-mobile-learning-webinar-series-2014//

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(m)Learning in the (Wide) Open: a presentation delivered as part of #ILMWS

  1. 1. @mseangallagher May, 2014 http://michaelseangallagher.org gallagher.michaelsean@gmail.com
  2. 2. Research • mLearning • Humanities • Multimodality • Field activity • Informal/formal learning • M4D
  3. 3. Questions 1. Mobility and motion in teaching and learning? 2. Deep learning? 3. Think and speak across modes, media, and spaces?
  4. 4. Observations • Incomplete understanding how learning works in open spaces (or how to define open at all) • Miniaturization of content/activities requires balance and contextualization (w/bigger picture thinking) • Process-oriented approach/pedagogy avoids technological determinism
  5. 5. Decisions • STEM or non-STEM? • Fuzzy ideas or discrete outputs? • Process over outcome? • Method or madness?
  6. 6. Observations Contextualization (Introduction, Orientation) Learning Process (Alignment, Discussion, Articulation, Initial Compositions) Outputs, Assessments and Literacies
  7. 7. Observations Contextualization (Introduction, Orientation) Learning Process (Alignment, Discussion, Articulation, Initial Compositions) Outputs, Assessments and Literacies
  8. 8. Open Space
  9. 9. Open: A definition Open= a state inclusivity objects, artifacts, places, people and events. It is also a mental state that acknowledges that meaning is gleaned from an alignment with what is available (Gallagher, Ihanaeinen, 2014).
  10. 10. Learning in the Open
  11. 11. Learning in the Open: Alignment
  12. 12. Learning in the Open: Alignment
  13. 13. Learning in the Open: Needs
  14. 14. Learning in the Open: Pedagogy
  15. 15. Learning in the Open: Events Formal • Helsinki (x2) • Seoul (x2) • Talinn Informal • Edinburgh • London • New York
  16. 16. Learning in the Open: Process 1. Open, informal workshop 2. Participant-driven 3. Objectives loosely defined 4. Data collected 5. Data reflected upon 6. Data composed 7. Scrutinized through dialogue/discussion
  17. 17. Learning in the Open: Process 1. Loosely negotiate a theme 2. Collect data 3. Identify themes emerging from data 4. Compose, present and share (OER)
  18. 18. Learning in the Open: Themes
  19. 19. Learning in the Open: Outputs * https://www.flickr.com/photos/peeii/14092475623/in/photostream
  20. 20. Learning in the Open: Outcomes
  21. 21. Potential for organizations
  22. 22. Potential for pedagogy
  23. 23. References 1. Gallagher, M. (2013). mLearning Workshop in Helsinki: Documenting the city through architecture, religion, sound, habitus. Retrieved May 8, 2014 from http://michaelseangallagher.org/mlearning-workshop-in-helsinki-documenting- the-city-through-architecture-religion-sound-habitus/ 2. Gallagher, M. S., & Ihanainen, P. Mobile Learning Field Activity: Pedagogy of Simultaneity to Support Learning in the Open. Retrieved May 8, 2014 from http://www.networkedlearningconference.org.uk/abstracts/pdf/gallagher.pdf. 3. Gallagher, M. (2013). mField Activities in the Humanities. Retrieved May 8, 2014 from http://michaelseangallagher.org/elearning/lessons-and-teaching/mfield- activities-in-the-humanities/. 4. Ross, J., Bayne, S., & Macleod, H. (2011). Manifesto for Teaching Online. Retrieved May 8, 2014 from http://onlineteachingmanifesto.wordpress.com 5. Pachler, N., Bachmair, B., Cook, J., & Kress, G. (2010). Mobile learning. Boston, MA: Springer. 6. Farman, J. (2012). Mobile interface theory. Embodies Space and Locative Media. New York and London: Routledge. 7. Knox, J. (2013) Five Critiques of the Open Educational Resources Movement. Teaching in Higher Education, DOI:10.1080/13562517.2013.774354
  24. 24. @mseangallagher May, 2014 http://michaelseangallagher.org gallagher.michaelsean@gmail.com

Editor's Notes

  • Open learning
    Open Source
    Open Access
    Learning in the Open


    Refer to Jeremy Knox research
  • Ubiquity
    Everything so there is nothing
    Begins with perception
  • Mobile learning needs to operationalize, or make visible, this stage of alignment
    Reducing emphasis on output in favor of process
    Emphasizes critical, artistic, and multimodal thinking (creativity)
  • Acknowledge the complexity (and potential) of the open world
    Identify methods for engaging with it (field activity)
    Identify and socially negotiate process
    Embed reflection early and often
  • We are naturally multimodal (because our worlds are)
    Transduction is the grinder of meaning, moving between modes stimulates critical thought
    Reasons and understanding emerge
  • Design/process orientation
    Active learning
    Critical thinking
    Manipulation of space
    Acceleration of lifelong learning
    Multimodality/media composition

  • Broadens scope and impact
    Extends formal learning into field
    Generates aggressive critical thinkers
    Design-oriented learners
    Removes straightjackets of assessments and curricula
    Ultimate skunkworks
  • Potential (for pedagogy)
    My conclusions: need for space manipulation, we have reached capacity in formal curricula, this approach releases pressure on formal learning, allows them to focus on content, practice, my learning emphasizes application, context, use of natural environments
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