Using Institutional Repositoriesand Special Collections toEnhance Institutional Visibility        Harold Thiele, Ph.D.    ...
EnvironmentMore and more institutionseither have establishedinstitutional repositories orspecial collections, or areplanni...
InstitutionsWhat types of institutions arewe talking about? Academic Libraries Government Libraries Public Libraries Speci...
LocationMost institutional repositoriesand special collectionsfunction as sub-units oflibraries or archives.              ...
Enhance Institutional VisibilityOne important goal of theinstitutional repository or specialcollection is to enhance thein...
AudiencesInternal audience Attract the attention and interest of institutional members   Contribute material     – Grow th...
AudiencesExternal audience Attract the attention and interest of non-institutional persons   Contribute material    – Grow...
Internal TechniquesContribute material Institutional Mandate (1)   Materials are required to be   deposited in the institu...
Mesa Verde National ParkAll research/scholarly materialsare deposited in the institutionalrepository.Organized using site ...
Lawrence Livermore National         LaboratoryAll research/scholarly materialsare deposited in the institutionalrepository...
LockheedAll research/scholarlymaterials are deposited in theinstitutional repository.Goes back to the 1920s.Under the libr...
Internal TechniquesContribute material Institutional Mandate (2)   Materials are required or strongly   recommended to be ...
Harvard DASHDigital Access to Scholarship at Harvard—a University-wide, open-access repository.Each faculty member grants ...
Harvard DASHMarket content using website, citation, andpromotion of articles and other materials added tothe repository.Wo...
DSpace@MITMITs institutional repository built tosave, share, and search MITs digitalresearch materials including anincreas...
DSpace@MITSuccess  5,000 scholarly articles that MIT Faculty have  made openly available on the web under their  Open Acce...
DSpace@MITSuccess  DSpace@MIT content was downloaded directly  by end-users over 15.2 million times or, on  average, at a ...
DSpace@MITActively promote the archives usingwebsite, publicity, articles.Strong community pressure (peerpressure) to cont...
Building ContentSurvey resources to identify contenton hand.Begin building community support forthe repository.Clarify int...
Building ContentEncouragement to deposit items isnot sufficient to raise self-archivingabove 15% (Harnad 2006)Mandated dep...
Building Student ContentSeveral institutions have focused onbuilding student content.  Some focus on undergraduate work  O...
Reference LibrariansReference librarians are an important linkin promoting the institutional repositoryand/or special coll...
Cooperative EffortsMost smaller schools do not have thepresence that larger schools have.By forming cooperative Institutio...
Cooperative Efforts (2)Institutions with similar interests cancreate a larger Internet visibility byforming cooperative as...
GKR = GALILEO Knowledge      Repository ProjectCooperative Institutional Repositoryheaded by Georgia Tech.  Each school ha...
The Liberal Arts Scholarly        Repository (LASR)Openly accessible repository that documents thescholarly and other crea...
The Liberal Arts Scholarly      Repository (LASR)African Digital Library SupportNetwork (ADLSN)  Enhancing knowledge acces...
Significant BarriersCopyright        Publisher permission, fear of infringing        copyright, publisher policies sow    ...
Positive InfluencesAccessibility          Increased communication with peers, discovery          using Internet search eng...
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Using Institutional Repositories and Special Collections to Enhance Institutional Visibility

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Utilizing multiple methodologies and techniques, institutional repositories and special collections can enhance their internal and external visibility and improve the usability and impact of their holdings. Presented at GaCOMO12 by Harold Thiele.

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Using Institutional Repositories and Special Collections to Enhance Institutional Visibility

  1. 1. Using Institutional Repositoriesand Special Collections toEnhance Institutional Visibility Harold Thiele, Ph.D. COMO XXIV, Macon, GA October 5, 2012 1
  2. 2. EnvironmentMore and more institutionseither have establishedinstitutional repositories orspecial collections, or areplanning to establishinstitutional repositories orspecial collections. 2
  3. 3. InstitutionsWhat types of institutions arewe talking about? Academic Libraries Government Libraries Public Libraries Special Libraries 3
  4. 4. LocationMost institutional repositoriesand special collectionsfunction as sub-units oflibraries or archives. 4
  5. 5. Enhance Institutional VisibilityOne important goal of theinstitutional repository or specialcollection is to enhance theinstitutional visibility. Justify the existence of the institutional repository or special collection. Attract additional support and funding. 5
  6. 6. AudiencesInternal audience Attract the attention and interest of institutional members Contribute material – Grow the collection Utilize materials – Justifies the collection Recognize the value of the collection – Administrators & Managers 6
  7. 7. AudiencesExternal audience Attract the attention and interest of non-institutional persons Contribute material – Grow the collection Utilize materials – Justifies the collection Recognize the value of the collection – Funders and stakeholders 7
  8. 8. Internal TechniquesContribute material Institutional Mandate (1) Materials are required to be deposited in the institutional repository. Most common in corporate and government environments. Often restricted access. 8
  9. 9. Mesa Verde National ParkAll research/scholarly materialsare deposited in the institutionalrepository.Organized using site locationsbased on GPS backbone.Over 130 years of materialdeposited.Under the museum. 9
  10. 10. Lawrence Livermore National LaboratoryAll research/scholarly materialsare deposited in the institutionalrepository.All senior researchers &managers must provide detailedexit interviews to the repository.Under archives.Restricted access. 10
  11. 11. LockheedAll research/scholarlymaterials are deposited in theinstitutional repository.Goes back to the 1920s.Under the library.Restricted access. 11
  12. 12. Internal TechniquesContribute material Institutional Mandate (2) Materials are required or strongly recommended to be deposited in the institutional repository. Peer pressure. Most common in academic environments. Open access. 12
  13. 13. Harvard DASHDigital Access to Scholarship at Harvard—a University-wide, open-access repository.Each faculty member grants to thePresident and Fellows of Harvard Collegepermission to make available his or herscholarly articles and to exercise thecopyright in those articles.Integrated so fully into other faculty toolsthat self-archiving just becomes secondnature.Opt out system. 13
  14. 14. Harvard DASHMarket content using website, citation, andpromotion of articles and other materials added tothe repository.Work in DASH, it becomes visible to colleaguesaround the world by virtue of metadata harvesting,Google Scholar, and other indexing services. Higher visibility leads to higher rates of citation and impact. When you post early versions of your work, before publication, you establish intellectual priority sooner.Using social media (twitter) to promote newadditions to the repository. 14
  15. 15. DSpace@MITMITs institutional repository built tosave, share, and search MITs digitalresearch materials including anincreasing number of conferencepapers, images, peer-reviewedscholarly articles, preprints, technicalreports, theses, working papers, andmore. 15
  16. 16. DSpace@MITSuccess 5,000 scholarly articles that MIT Faculty have made openly available on the web under their Open Access Policy. Articles have been viewed more than 380,000 times since the collection was launched in October 2009. Downloaded at a rate that has grown to more than 30,000 per month, with requests from nearly every country in the world . 16
  17. 17. DSpace@MITSuccess DSpace@MIT content was downloaded directly by end-users over 15.2 million times or, on average, at a rate of over 41,000 files per day. Contains selected digital theses and dissertations from all MIT departments dating as far back as the mid-1800s. Since 2004, all new Masters and Ph.D theses have been added to the collection after degrees have been awarded. 17
  18. 18. DSpace@MITActively promote the archives usingwebsite, publicity, articles.Strong community pressure (peerpressure) to contribute to therepository.Grew out of paper repository.Tradition at MIT for professors toleave their papers to the archives. 18
  19. 19. Building ContentSurvey resources to identify contenton hand.Begin building community support forthe repository.Clarify intellectual property issues.Encourage deposits of content. Security & preservation Promotion 19
  20. 20. Building ContentEncouragement to deposit items isnot sufficient to raise self-archivingabove 15% (Harnad 2006)Mandated deposits are required tomove beyond the slow, expensive,time intensive piecemeal processmost institutions used.Mandated student deposits tomandated faculty deposits. 20
  21. 21. Building Student ContentSeveral institutions have focused onbuilding student content. Some focus on undergraduate work Others focus on thesis and dissertationsRequiring deposit as a condition ofgraduation helps to ensure contentgrowth.Provide a fixed location for thematerials. 21
  22. 22. Reference LibrariansReference librarians are an important linkin promoting the institutional repositoryand/or special collections.Reference librarians are subject expertsand work as collection developmentspecialists.They interface with the departments andare well position to promote the IR andopen access to their departments. 22
  23. 23. Cooperative EffortsMost smaller schools do not have thepresence that larger schools have.By forming cooperative InstitutionalRepositories schools increase thequantity of material they are able topresent raising their visibility andreducing costs. 23
  24. 24. Cooperative Efforts (2)Institutions with similar interests cancreate a larger Internet visibility byforming cooperative associations.Hosting the content on specializedhosting sites can also reduce costsand increase visibility. Open Archive (National Library of Medicine) 24
  25. 25. GKR = GALILEO Knowledge Repository ProjectCooperative Institutional Repositoryheaded by Georgia Tech. Each school has its own space and brand. Metadata is harvested jointly and provided to Internet search engines. Plan is to move hosting to Open Archive to reduce costs and increase visibility. 25
  26. 26. The Liberal Arts Scholarly Repository (LASR)Openly accessible repository that documents thescholarly and other creative activity of studentsand faculty of small, selective liberal arts colleges. Provides individual scholars and students at those institutions the opportunity to share, explore, discover, and evolve the ideas, experience, and inquiry fundamental to liberal education. LASR is the name of a collaborative group, currently consisting of Bucknell University, Carleton College, Grinnell College, St. Lawrence University, Trinity University, the University of Richmond, and Whitman College. 26
  27. 27. The Liberal Arts Scholarly Repository (LASR)African Digital Library SupportNetwork (ADLSN) Enhancing knowledge access by promoting and assisting the development of low-cost digital libraries in Africa by promoting node development. 27
  28. 28. Significant BarriersCopyright Publisher permission, fear of infringing copyright, publisher policies sow confusion.Age Younger faculty more readily self archive than older faculty. Used to using Internet for resource location.Time & Effort Greater the time & effort required, the less likely to self-archive. 28
  29. 29. Positive InfluencesAccessibility Increased communication with peers, discovery using Internet search engines, long-term preservation. Open access is an important component.Publicity Enlarged readership, increased potential impact, earlier dissemination of research findings. Use of web resources and social media.Professional Recognition Increased visibility, increased citations. Some studies show up to a 25% increase in citation rate. 29

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